Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (5)

All (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1996002
    Description:

    This paper attempts to rescue a small but nonetheless important segment of the Canadian population from neglect, those classified by the census as long-term residents in collective dwellings. In 1991, 440,000 Canadians belonged to this population, living in nursing homes, correctional institutions, rooming houses and the like. The changing age-sex structure of the Canadian population caused their number to increase between 1971 and 1991, despite the fact that Canadian men and women were less likely at most ages to live in collective dwellings in the latter year.

    Non-census data on several segments of this population are reviewed, especially for people in health-related institutions and in correctional facilities, and reveal that long-term residents are in each case a small fraction of a much larger population with a relatively brief contact with the institution on average. This review concludes that non-census data can provide a useful context for the study of the population in collective dwellings, but that the census is at present the only data source providing a comprehensive overview, despite the limited data collected and the even more limited data published.

    Special tabulations from the 1971, 1981 and 1991 censuses are used to explore its changing size and age-sex structure with particular attention to three of its components, people in health-related institutions, in service collective dwellings and in religious institutions. A significant difference between people in collective dwellings and those in private dwellings is that the former have, whether willingly or unwillingly, left the family circle. Hence, marital status is a key variable, and is used to show the close relationship between the changing marital status of the population, in particular the declining numbers of the never married and the growing numbers of separated, widowed or divorced older women, and structural changes.

    Release date: 1996-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960032895
    Description:

    The number of dual-earner couples increased in the 1980s, but has this translated to more dual-pensioner families in the 1990s? The growth of husband-wife couples with both spouses receiving private pension benefits is compared with that of their single- and no-pensioner counterparts. Sources of pension income are also analyzed.

    Release date: 1996-09-03

  • Public use microdata: 89M0002X
    Description:

    What do parents do when neither is available to care for their children? Who takes care of the children? What care arrangements are being used? How much does the average family have to pay for child care? How many hours per week does the average child spend being cared for by persons other than his/her parents? Why families choose their present care arrangements? The Survey of Child Care provides answers to some of these questions.

    Release date: 1996-08-30

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012527
    Description:

    The official unemployment rate released each month is based on individuals. Also released, but less recognized, are family-based rates. Unemployment rates for individuals and families are compared using data from two different sources over the period 1980 to 1993.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Public use microdata: 89M0002X
    Description:

    What do parents do when neither is available to care for their children? Who takes care of the children? What care arrangements are being used? How much does the average family have to pay for child care? How many hours per week does the average child spend being cared for by persons other than his/her parents? Why families choose their present care arrangements? The Survey of Child Care provides answers to some of these questions.

    Release date: 1996-08-30

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) (3 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1996002
    Description:

    This paper attempts to rescue a small but nonetheless important segment of the Canadian population from neglect, those classified by the census as long-term residents in collective dwellings. In 1991, 440,000 Canadians belonged to this population, living in nursing homes, correctional institutions, rooming houses and the like. The changing age-sex structure of the Canadian population caused their number to increase between 1971 and 1991, despite the fact that Canadian men and women were less likely at most ages to live in collective dwellings in the latter year.

    Non-census data on several segments of this population are reviewed, especially for people in health-related institutions and in correctional facilities, and reveal that long-term residents are in each case a small fraction of a much larger population with a relatively brief contact with the institution on average. This review concludes that non-census data can provide a useful context for the study of the population in collective dwellings, but that the census is at present the only data source providing a comprehensive overview, despite the limited data collected and the even more limited data published.

    Special tabulations from the 1971, 1981 and 1991 censuses are used to explore its changing size and age-sex structure with particular attention to three of its components, people in health-related institutions, in service collective dwellings and in religious institutions. A significant difference between people in collective dwellings and those in private dwellings is that the former have, whether willingly or unwillingly, left the family circle. Hence, marital status is a key variable, and is used to show the close relationship between the changing marital status of the population, in particular the declining numbers of the never married and the growing numbers of separated, widowed or divorced older women, and structural changes.

    Release date: 1996-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960032895
    Description:

    The number of dual-earner couples increased in the 1980s, but has this translated to more dual-pensioner families in the 1990s? The growth of husband-wife couples with both spouses receiving private pension benefits is compared with that of their single- and no-pensioner counterparts. Sources of pension income are also analyzed.

    Release date: 1996-09-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960012527
    Description:

    The official unemployment rate released each month is based on individuals. Also released, but less recognized, are family-based rates. Unemployment rates for individuals and families are compared using data from two different sources over the period 1980 to 1993.

    Release date: 1996-03-12

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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