Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (20)

All (20) (20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034788
    Description:

    This article examines the location of First Nations communities whose well-being is above average, average and below average. It then compares the living conditions of these First Nations communities with those of other Canadian communities.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034785
    Description:

    This article examines the family circumstances of 8- to 11-year-old youngsters to assess the link between behaviour and certain family characteristics.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014850
    Description:

    The chapter discusses the implications of demographic changes for the family ties of current and future older Canadians, focusing on the extent to which families can sustain support to their older members. Among those aged 65 and over, the likelihood of being married increased between 1981 and 1996. However, while the modal experience for men aged 75 and over is to be married, the modal experience for women of this age is to be widowed. The proportion of divorced or separated individuals rose consistently from 1961 to 1991 for all age groups, with slightly higher percentages among women. Current trends indicate that widowhood will decline and divorce will increase in significance as the basis for being unattached in old age. Major changes in family size include a decline in the percentage of women who are childless or have only one child and who have five or more children. Regarding siblings, most Canadians have at least one brother or sister. Although the proportion of adults with five or more brothers and sisters and with no siblings has declined, there has been an increase in the percentages for those with one to four siblings. Most Canadians do and will have the potential support of siblings in their familial networks. Smaller families, greater geographic dispersion, and higher divorce rates may increase the need for siblings to work together to support their parents and one another.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014845
    Description:

    This chapter assesses some of the key demographic and social changes affecting British social policy in the field of ageing. In the 1990s, personal care needs of the elderly are overwhelming provided by the family, where one is available. Formal care services are much more likely to be provided to those who live alone and have no family members who live near them or to those whose relatives do not have the skills or capabilities to care for them. However, There are changing attitudes regarding the giving and receiving of care and changing patterns of marriage and partnerships. Older people are moving away from wanting dependence on children, especially when it implies a long-term commitment arising out of a chronic illness or the need to provide personal care. Future trends will be affected by demographic and social changes affecting different age cohorts. Notable among these changes is the move towards both later marriage as well as the increased tendency to live outside any form of partnership. Another is the increased diversity of family forms. The family of the future may become at least as much an advocate for a vulnerable elder as it is a direct care provider. Demography is working hand-in hand with shifts in social and personal preferences.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014851
    Description:

    This chapter aims at using a generational approach to describe the lifestyle of the elderly in the early 1990s. Individuals observed for the purpose of this chapter were born between 1920 and 1936, approximately corresponding to parents of baby boomers. Beyond the positive relationship between the likelihood of institutionalization and an individual's age, marital status also appeared to play a key role. The marked difference between men's and women's life expectancies in private households, combined with a declining propensity of women to remarry after being widowed or divorced, have made elderly women twice as likely to live alone as men. The private households in which the elderly live are most often small, unigenerational family homes. When the household extends beyond this framework, disparities between men and women begin to appear. A man is more likely to cohabit with other generations if his wife was still part of the household. On the other hand, single women are more likely to live alone or with persons to whom they were not related. Women over 65 living within multigenerational households had a greater completed fertility rate than those living in unigenerational households. The fact that mothers of baby boomers are likely to have had a relatively large number of children is thus reassuring concerning their future access to informal support networks. However, we should observe other phenomena that could influence the establishment of informal networks, especially divorce - the increase of which among baby boomers could have a major impact.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Table: 84-214-X
    Description:

    This compendium of vital statistics includes summary data on births, deaths, marriages and divorces. The introduction covers the data sources, data quality, and methods pertaining to each event, and includes a glossary defining the terms used. The first chapter is a brief overview of vital statistics for 1996. Subsequent chapters treat marriage, divorce, birth, fetal and infant mortality, total mortality, causes of death, vital statistics by census division, and international comparisons. Most charts and tables show Canada data for 1986 though 1996, while the charts and tables for causes of death show Canada data for 1979 through1996. Data for the provinces and territories are usually shown for 1995 and 1996. Appendices include population denominator data, age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) calculation methods, and leading causes of death methodology.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014700
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article studies the links between academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014701
    Description:

    This article examines the influences of neighbourhood and family socio-economic characteristics on children's readiness to start school. It uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044655
    Description:

    This article offers one definition on parental involvement and reviews a number of questions asked about elementary school children (aged 4 - 11) in the first cycle of the NLSCY (1994 -95).

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Public use microdata: 95M0011X
    Description:

    This file provides housing information - type of structure, number of rooms, shelter costs - along with details of household composition and socio-economic information pertaining to the household maintainers and their families. It contains 137 variables.

    The Microdata Files contain samples of anonymous responses to the 1996 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. PUMFs enable the development of statistical information about Canadians, the families and households to which they belong, and the dwellings in which they live.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. This makes PUMFs a powerful research tools. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. These provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    All subject matter covered by the census is included in these files.

    The 1996 PUMFs will only be released on CD-ROM using microcomputer applications.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Public use microdata: 95M0012X
    Description:

    This file contains details of family composition in Canada. It features 145 variables, such as information on labour force activity and income for census family and non-family persons.

    The Microdata Files contain samples of anonymous responses to the 1996 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. PUMFs enable the development of statistical information about Canadians, the families and households to which they belong, and the dwellings in which they live.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. This makes PUMFs a powerful research tools. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. These provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    All subject matter covered by the census is included in these files.

    The 1996 PUMFs will only be released on CD-ROM using microcomputer applications.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Public use microdata: 95M0015X
    Description:

    This file provides housing information - type of structure, number of rooms, shelter costs - along with details of household composition and socio-economic information pertaining to the household maintainers and their families. It contains 138 variables.

    Release date: 1999-07-16

  • Public use microdata: 95M0010X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population such as ethnic origin, labour force activity and income levels. It contains 122 variables.

    The Microdata Files contain samples of anonymous responses to the 1996 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. PUMFs enable the development of statistical information about Canadians, the families and households to which they belong, and the dwellings in which they live.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. This makes PUMFs a powerful research tools. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. These provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    All subject matter covered by the census is included in these files.

    The 1996 PUMFs will only be released on CD-ROM using microcomputer applications.

    Release date: 1999-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999135
    Description:

    Two quasi-experiments are used to estimate the impact of parental divorce on the adult incomes and labour market behaviour of adolescents, as well as on their use of social programs, and their marital/fertility behaviour. These involve the use of individuals experiencing the death of a parent, and legislative changes to the Canadian divorce law in 1986. Parental loss by death is assumed to be exogenous; the experiences of children with a bereaved background offering a benchmark to assess the endogeneity of parental loss through divorce. Differences between individuals with divorced parents and those from intact and bereaved families significantly overstate the impact of divorce across a broad range of outcomes. When background characteristics are controlled for-most notably the income and labour market activity of parents in the years leading up to the divorce-parental divorce seems to influence the marital and fertility decisions of children, but not their labour market outcomes. Adolescents whose parents divorced tend to put off marriage, and once married suffer a greater likelihood of marital instability, but their earnings and incomes are not on average much different from others.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014573
    Description:

    This article examines some of the characteristics that appear to predispose widowed women to live on their own, with particular emphasis on the extent of their contact with family and friends.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014578
    Description:

    This article looks at which women have the greatest chance of bearing a third child.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014575
    Description:

    This article looks at three-generation households.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999132
    Description:

    Child poverty is high on the government's agenda. In order to reduce the rate of low-income among children, one has to either reduce the number of children flowing into low-income, or increase the number flowing out. But what is behind such movement? Most analysts would immediately think of job loss among the parents, but obviously divorce and remarriage can also play a role. In order to favourably alter the flows, one has to have some understanding of what is driving them. This paper asks to what extent this movement of children is determined by (1) changes in family status of the parents of children, or (2) changes in the parent's labour market conditions (i.e. job loss and gain, changes in hours of work or wages). We find that for an individual child, a divorce or marriage can have a tremendous influence on the likelihood of entering or exiting low-income. At the level of the individual, changes in family composition (when they occur) are more important than changes in jobs held by parents. However, changes in family status are relatively infrequent compared to labour market changes. Parents are much more likely to lose or find jobs, and experience changes in hours worked or wages, than they are to marry or divorce. When this is accounted for we find that, in the aggregate, flows of children into and out of low income are associated roughly equally with family compositional changes and changes in wages and hours worked.

    Release date: 1999-04-21

  • Index and guides: 92-353-X
    Description:

    This report deals with age, sex, marital status and common-law status. It is aimed at informing users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the theoretical framework and definitions used to gather the data, and describes unusual circumstances that could affect data quality. Moreover, the report touches upon data capture, edit and imputation, and deals with the historical comparability of the data.

    Release date: 1999-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044417
    Description:

    This article looks at the growing phenomenon of young adults continuing to live at home with their parents.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Table: 84-214-X
    Description:

    This compendium of vital statistics includes summary data on births, deaths, marriages and divorces. The introduction covers the data sources, data quality, and methods pertaining to each event, and includes a glossary defining the terms used. The first chapter is a brief overview of vital statistics for 1996. Subsequent chapters treat marriage, divorce, birth, fetal and infant mortality, total mortality, causes of death, vital statistics by census division, and international comparisons. Most charts and tables show Canada data for 1986 though 1996, while the charts and tables for causes of death show Canada data for 1979 through1996. Data for the provinces and territories are usually shown for 1995 and 1996. Appendices include population denominator data, age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) calculation methods, and leading causes of death methodology.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Public use microdata: 95M0011X
    Description:

    This file provides housing information - type of structure, number of rooms, shelter costs - along with details of household composition and socio-economic information pertaining to the household maintainers and their families. It contains 137 variables.

    The Microdata Files contain samples of anonymous responses to the 1996 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. PUMFs enable the development of statistical information about Canadians, the families and households to which they belong, and the dwellings in which they live.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. This makes PUMFs a powerful research tools. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. These provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    All subject matter covered by the census is included in these files.

    The 1996 PUMFs will only be released on CD-ROM using microcomputer applications.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Public use microdata: 95M0012X
    Description:

    This file contains details of family composition in Canada. It features 145 variables, such as information on labour force activity and income for census family and non-family persons.

    The Microdata Files contain samples of anonymous responses to the 1996 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. PUMFs enable the development of statistical information about Canadians, the families and households to which they belong, and the dwellings in which they live.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. This makes PUMFs a powerful research tools. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. These provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    All subject matter covered by the census is included in these files.

    The 1996 PUMFs will only be released on CD-ROM using microcomputer applications.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Public use microdata: 95M0015X
    Description:

    This file provides housing information - type of structure, number of rooms, shelter costs - along with details of household composition and socio-economic information pertaining to the household maintainers and their families. It contains 138 variables.

    Release date: 1999-07-16

  • Public use microdata: 95M0010X
    Description:

    This file provides data on the characteristics of the population such as ethnic origin, labour force activity and income levels. It contains 122 variables.

    The Microdata Files contain samples of anonymous responses to the 1996 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses. PUMFs enable the development of statistical information about Canadians, the families and households to which they belong, and the dwellings in which they live.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. This makes PUMFs a powerful research tools. The user can group and manipulate these variables to suit his/her own data and research requirements. These provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    All subject matter covered by the census is included in these files.

    The 1996 PUMFs will only be released on CD-ROM using microcomputer applications.

    Release date: 1999-07-13

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034788
    Description:

    This article examines the location of First Nations communities whose well-being is above average, average and below average. It then compares the living conditions of these First Nations communities with those of other Canadian communities.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034785
    Description:

    This article examines the family circumstances of 8- to 11-year-old youngsters to assess the link between behaviour and certain family characteristics.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014850
    Description:

    The chapter discusses the implications of demographic changes for the family ties of current and future older Canadians, focusing on the extent to which families can sustain support to their older members. Among those aged 65 and over, the likelihood of being married increased between 1981 and 1996. However, while the modal experience for men aged 75 and over is to be married, the modal experience for women of this age is to be widowed. The proportion of divorced or separated individuals rose consistently from 1961 to 1991 for all age groups, with slightly higher percentages among women. Current trends indicate that widowhood will decline and divorce will increase in significance as the basis for being unattached in old age. Major changes in family size include a decline in the percentage of women who are childless or have only one child and who have five or more children. Regarding siblings, most Canadians have at least one brother or sister. Although the proportion of adults with five or more brothers and sisters and with no siblings has declined, there has been an increase in the percentages for those with one to four siblings. Most Canadians do and will have the potential support of siblings in their familial networks. Smaller families, greater geographic dispersion, and higher divorce rates may increase the need for siblings to work together to support their parents and one another.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014845
    Description:

    This chapter assesses some of the key demographic and social changes affecting British social policy in the field of ageing. In the 1990s, personal care needs of the elderly are overwhelming provided by the family, where one is available. Formal care services are much more likely to be provided to those who live alone and have no family members who live near them or to those whose relatives do not have the skills or capabilities to care for them. However, There are changing attitudes regarding the giving and receiving of care and changing patterns of marriage and partnerships. Older people are moving away from wanting dependence on children, especially when it implies a long-term commitment arising out of a chronic illness or the need to provide personal care. Future trends will be affected by demographic and social changes affecting different age cohorts. Notable among these changes is the move towards both later marriage as well as the increased tendency to live outside any form of partnership. Another is the increased diversity of family forms. The family of the future may become at least as much an advocate for a vulnerable elder as it is a direct care provider. Demography is working hand-in hand with shifts in social and personal preferences.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014851
    Description:

    This chapter aims at using a generational approach to describe the lifestyle of the elderly in the early 1990s. Individuals observed for the purpose of this chapter were born between 1920 and 1936, approximately corresponding to parents of baby boomers. Beyond the positive relationship between the likelihood of institutionalization and an individual's age, marital status also appeared to play a key role. The marked difference between men's and women's life expectancies in private households, combined with a declining propensity of women to remarry after being widowed or divorced, have made elderly women twice as likely to live alone as men. The private households in which the elderly live are most often small, unigenerational family homes. When the household extends beyond this framework, disparities between men and women begin to appear. A man is more likely to cohabit with other generations if his wife was still part of the household. On the other hand, single women are more likely to live alone or with persons to whom they were not related. Women over 65 living within multigenerational households had a greater completed fertility rate than those living in unigenerational households. The fact that mothers of baby boomers are likely to have had a relatively large number of children is thus reassuring concerning their future access to informal support networks. However, we should observe other phenomena that could influence the establishment of informal networks, especially divorce - the increase of which among baby boomers could have a major impact.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014700
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article studies the links between academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014701
    Description:

    This article examines the influences of neighbourhood and family socio-economic characteristics on children's readiness to start school. It uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980044655
    Description:

    This article offers one definition on parental involvement and reviews a number of questions asked about elementary school children (aged 4 - 11) in the first cycle of the NLSCY (1994 -95).

    Release date: 1999-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999135
    Description:

    Two quasi-experiments are used to estimate the impact of parental divorce on the adult incomes and labour market behaviour of adolescents, as well as on their use of social programs, and their marital/fertility behaviour. These involve the use of individuals experiencing the death of a parent, and legislative changes to the Canadian divorce law in 1986. Parental loss by death is assumed to be exogenous; the experiences of children with a bereaved background offering a benchmark to assess the endogeneity of parental loss through divorce. Differences between individuals with divorced parents and those from intact and bereaved families significantly overstate the impact of divorce across a broad range of outcomes. When background characteristics are controlled for-most notably the income and labour market activity of parents in the years leading up to the divorce-parental divorce seems to influence the marital and fertility decisions of children, but not their labour market outcomes. Adolescents whose parents divorced tend to put off marriage, and once married suffer a greater likelihood of marital instability, but their earnings and incomes are not on average much different from others.

    Release date: 1999-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014573
    Description:

    This article examines some of the characteristics that appear to predispose widowed women to live on their own, with particular emphasis on the extent of their contact with family and friends.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014578
    Description:

    This article looks at which women have the greatest chance of bearing a third child.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014575
    Description:

    This article looks at three-generation households.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999132
    Description:

    Child poverty is high on the government's agenda. In order to reduce the rate of low-income among children, one has to either reduce the number of children flowing into low-income, or increase the number flowing out. But what is behind such movement? Most analysts would immediately think of job loss among the parents, but obviously divorce and remarriage can also play a role. In order to favourably alter the flows, one has to have some understanding of what is driving them. This paper asks to what extent this movement of children is determined by (1) changes in family status of the parents of children, or (2) changes in the parent's labour market conditions (i.e. job loss and gain, changes in hours of work or wages). We find that for an individual child, a divorce or marriage can have a tremendous influence on the likelihood of entering or exiting low-income. At the level of the individual, changes in family composition (when they occur) are more important than changes in jobs held by parents. However, changes in family status are relatively infrequent compared to labour market changes. Parents are much more likely to lose or find jobs, and experience changes in hours worked or wages, than they are to marry or divorce. When this is accounted for we find that, in the aggregate, flows of children into and out of low income are associated roughly equally with family compositional changes and changes in wages and hours worked.

    Release date: 1999-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044417
    Description:

    This article looks at the growing phenomenon of young adults continuing to live at home with their parents.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

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