Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001171
    Description:

    A framework for thinking about intergenerational mobility as it relates to the relationship between parent and child incomes as well as evidence on the degree and sources of intergenerational mobility in Canada is reviewed. The major conclusion is that Canadian society is characterized by a good deal of intergenerational mobility, and the available evidence suggests that being raised in low-income does not pre-ordain children to low-income in adulthood. Canada compares well in this regard to many other countries, being characterized on average by more mobility than the U.S. or U.K. and on a par with some of the most mobile nations. The sources for this pattern have to do with access to high quality education, and high quality non-monetary investments in children. However, there is no clear evidence linking the level of family income to the nature of these investments.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025819
    Description:

    This article examines whether adults who experienced change in their parental structure regard their childhood as happy and if they were less close to their parents than children whose families remained intact.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025825
    Description:

    This article examines the characteristics of people living in mobile homes, with special emphasis on the differences between rural and urban households.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Description:

    In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010015704
    Description:

    This article examines the migratory behaviour of individuals in the context of a family strategy.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015844
    Description:

    The at-risk child is defined by the author as a "child whose personal characteristics or environmental characteristics" indicate "at a very early age, a strong probability of psychopathologic development." Therefore, in the second section of the paper, the author focussed on intervention strategies for vulnerable children. The third section of the paper summarized resilience and its construct. The fourth section of the paper focussed on risk factors and protection factors. The author concluded his presentation and his paper by asserting that resiliency studies are very complex owing to the multiple interaction between the various environmental factors.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015837
    Description:

    Allen Zeesman shared findings from the National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth (NLSCY) and the Understanding the Early Years survey (UEY).

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015848
    Description:

    The authors began by noting that the concept of the "adolescent mother" encompasses a multitude of factors and indicators, which include the rates of fertility (birth rates) and pregnancy.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2001046
    Description:

    This paper explores the current geographical patterning of First Nations communities. It looks at possible strategies for their socio-economic development and compares these communities with the socio-economic landscape of non-Aboriginal Canada.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2000004
    Description:

    Housing conditions are an important element of well-being. The Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC, 1999) has developed measures of the suitability of housing in terms of size, condition, and affordability. The purpose of this bulletin is to review the patterns of housing conditions in the predominantly rural regions of Canada.

    Release date: 2001-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001159
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to examine the extent to which an individual's use of unemployment insurance (UI) as a young adult is influenced by past experience with the program, and by having had a parent who also collected UI. A major methodological challenge is to determine the extent to which the intergenerational correlation of UI status is "spurious" or causal. Both the time to a first UI claim and the entire sequence of claims over an extended period are examined using two alternative ways of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. The analysis is based upon longitudinal data on a cohort of young Canadian and Swedish men. It is found that parental use of UI shortens the time to a first UI claim in Canada, but not in Sweden. Subsequent participation in the Canadian program is influenced by parental UI history. In Sweden individual learning through past participation in UI - not family background - is the dominant avenue determining repeated participation.

    Release date: 2001-01-12

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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001171
    Description:

    A framework for thinking about intergenerational mobility as it relates to the relationship between parent and child incomes as well as evidence on the degree and sources of intergenerational mobility in Canada is reviewed. The major conclusion is that Canadian society is characterized by a good deal of intergenerational mobility, and the available evidence suggests that being raised in low-income does not pre-ordain children to low-income in adulthood. Canada compares well in this regard to many other countries, being characterized on average by more mobility than the U.S. or U.K. and on a par with some of the most mobile nations. The sources for this pattern have to do with access to high quality education, and high quality non-monetary investments in children. However, there is no clear evidence linking the level of family income to the nature of these investments.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025819
    Description:

    This article examines whether adults who experienced change in their parental structure regard their childhood as happy and if they were less close to their parents than children whose families remained intact.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025825
    Description:

    This article examines the characteristics of people living in mobile homes, with special emphasis on the differences between rural and urban households.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Description:

    In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010015704
    Description:

    This article examines the migratory behaviour of individuals in the context of a family strategy.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2000004
    Description:

    Housing conditions are an important element of well-being. The Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC, 1999) has developed measures of the suitability of housing in terms of size, condition, and affordability. The purpose of this bulletin is to review the patterns of housing conditions in the predominantly rural regions of Canada.

    Release date: 2001-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001159
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to examine the extent to which an individual's use of unemployment insurance (UI) as a young adult is influenced by past experience with the program, and by having had a parent who also collected UI. A major methodological challenge is to determine the extent to which the intergenerational correlation of UI status is "spurious" or causal. Both the time to a first UI claim and the entire sequence of claims over an extended period are examined using two alternative ways of controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. The analysis is based upon longitudinal data on a cohort of young Canadian and Swedish men. It is found that parental use of UI shortens the time to a first UI claim in Canada, but not in Sweden. Subsequent participation in the Canadian program is influenced by parental UI history. In Sweden individual learning through past participation in UI - not family background - is the dominant avenue determining repeated participation.

    Release date: 2001-01-12

Reference (8)

Reference (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015844
    Description:

    The at-risk child is defined by the author as a "child whose personal characteristics or environmental characteristics" indicate "at a very early age, a strong probability of psychopathologic development." Therefore, in the second section of the paper, the author focussed on intervention strategies for vulnerable children. The third section of the paper summarized resilience and its construct. The fourth section of the paper focussed on risk factors and protection factors. The author concluded his presentation and his paper by asserting that resiliency studies are very complex owing to the multiple interaction between the various environmental factors.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015837
    Description:

    Allen Zeesman shared findings from the National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth (NLSCY) and the Understanding the Early Years survey (UEY).

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015848
    Description:

    The authors began by noting that the concept of the "adolescent mother" encompasses a multitude of factors and indicators, which include the rates of fertility (birth rates) and pregnancy.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2001046
    Description:

    This paper explores the current geographical patterning of First Nations communities. It looks at possible strategies for their socio-economic development and compares these communities with the socio-economic landscape of non-Aboriginal Canada.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

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