Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (77)

All (77) (25 of 77 results)

Data (69)

Data (69) (25 of 69 results)

Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036395
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which Canadian families are financially vulnerable to adverse events, such as a sudden loss of income or unexpected bills.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001004
    Description:

    This product includes a data quality note and two data tables on collective dwellings in the 2001 Census.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001003
    Description:

    This topic provides information on families and households in Canada. The 2001 Census data show that the diversification of family and household settings continues, and that the trends have an impact on all Canadians, including children, young adults and seniors. Several indicators are used to highlight provincial and territorial differences.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2002-10-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-576-X
    Description:

    The increasing popularity of common-law unions is transforming family life in Canada, according to new data from the 2001 General Social Survey. Over the past 30 years, common-law unions have become more and more popular, especially in Quebec and among younger women in other provinces.

    Although younger women are more likely to start their conjugal life by living common law, most will eventually marry. First common-law unions are twice as likely to end in separation as first marriages. What is more, a growing proportion of women have experienced at least two unions, and the likelihood of choosing a common-law relationship over marriage for the second union is also increasing. The analysis shows that the trends observed in the formation and break-up of unions apply equally to men and women. Since men are on average older than women when they start their conjugal life, they tend to experience the events at an older age.

    Release date: 2002-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016196
    Description:

    This profile presents some of the characteristics of Canadian households that own a vacation home.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002185
    Description:

    This paper examines whether long-run labour market outcomes depend on residential environment among adults who grew up in subsidized housing in Toronto. The housing program in Toronto provides a full spectrum of neighbourhood quality types to measure outcome differences, and offers a real-life example of large scale neighbourhood quality reform. A primary advantage with this approach is that, conditional on participation in public housing, residential choice is substantially limited. Families that applied for public housing could not specify which project they wished to be housed in and were constrained to what was offered based on availability at the time they applied and by family size. Unlike previous housing mobility experiments, the availability of administrative tax records are used to measure both short and long run outcomes. The results indicate almost no difference in educational attainment, adult earnings, income, and social assistance participation between children from different public housing types. Average outcomes, estimated wage distributions, and outcome correlations among unrelated project neighbours show no significant neighbourhood impact. In contrast, family differences seem to matter a great deal.

    Release date: 2002-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010046117
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors that contribute to frequent contact between adult children aged 25 to 54 and their parents.

    Release date: 2002-03-11

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