Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (20) (20 of 20 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005007
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2005-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005272
    Description:

    This paper makes use of matched tax-return data for daughters, their parents, their partners and their partners' parents to investigate the interactions between intergenerational mobility and marital matching for young couples in Canada. We show how assortative mating contributes to intergenerational household income persistence. The strength of the association between sons-in-law's income and women's parental income means that the intergenerational link between household incomes is stronger than that found for daughters' own incomes alone. This is also the case when viewed from the other side, so that daughters' and their partners' earnings are related to partners' parental income. These results indicate that assortative matching magnifies individual-level intergenerational persistence.

    In the second part of the paper we consider assortative mating by parental income. We find that daughter's parental income has an elasticity of almost 0.2 with respect to her partner's parental income. This association is of approximately the same magnitude as the intergenerational link between parents' and children's incomes. We investigate variations in the correlation between the parental incomes across several measured dimensions; cohabiting couples have lower correlations, as do those who form partnerships early, those who live in rural areas and most interestingly, those who later divorce. We interpret this last result as evidence that, on average, couples with parental incomes that are more similar enjoy a more stable match.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005006
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2003 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005010
    Description:

    For some time, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) has used data on housing characteristics and housing-related expenditures from the Census of Population. Although the Census data source serves CMHC's purposes to a large extent, the federal government agency turned to the annual household surveys of Statistics Canada to provide information on a more frequent basis. This would allow them to have a better picture of annual trends, and perhaps have a greater choice of other characteristics with which to cross housing data on Canadian households. In 2001, CMHC began to sponsor additional content in both the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), starting with reference year 2002.

    Release date: 2005-07-22

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017961
    Description:

    Research consistently shows that delaying marriage tends to increase the likelihood that a person will never marry. After age 30, a single person may not wish to marry; it may seem less feasible or less desirable than it did when they were younger.

    This article looks at "mature singles," that is, men and women older than the average age at which people first marry (28 for women, 30 for men) but not yet past prime working-age (under 55). These men and women numbered over 1.1 million in 2001; they had never legally married and were not living common-law at the time of the survey. More than half a million of them did not think they would ever get married. The article examines some of the differences between those mature singles who do not expect to marry and those who do.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005252
    Description:

    Numerous studies equate immigrant homeownership with assimilation into the residential mainstream, though only rarely is this claim verified by studying the ethnic character of neighbourhoods where immigrants actually buy homes. In this paper, the 1996 and 2001 Census of Canada master files and bivariate probit models with sample selection corrections (a.k.a. Heckman probit models) are used to assess the neighbourhood-level ethnic determinants of homeownership in Toronto, Canada. By determining whether low levels of ethnic concentration accompany a home purchase, it can be assessed whether immigrants exit their enclaves in search of a home in the 'promised land', as traditional assimilation theory suggests, or if some now seek homes in the 'ethnic communities' that Logan, Alba and Zhang (2002) recently introduced in the American Sociological Review. Assessing the role of concentration under equilibrium conditions, evidence emerges that same-group concentration affects the propensity of several group members to buy homes.

    Release date: 2005-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005253
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled Are immigrants buying to get in? The role of ethnic clustering on the homeownership propensities of 12 Toronto immigrant groups, 1996-2001. Spatial assimilation theory is a model of status attainment that links the spatial and social positions of minority group members (Massey and Denton 1985). If applied to immigrants, the model would suggest that immigrants would first cluster in typically poor neighbourhoods with high concentrations of co-ethnics, but that ethnic concentration should be temporary and of declining utility. Once an immigrant family's socioeconomic status improves, they should merge into the residential 'mainstream' by moving to a better, and typically less segregated, neighbourhood (Massey and Denton 1985). Further, although housing tenure is not an explicit dimension of spatial assimilation theory, given the well-established relationship between income, human capital and homeownership (Balakrishnan and Wu 1992; Laryea 1999), and the importance of homeownership as an indicator of well-being and residential assimilation (Myers and Lee 1998), part of an immigrant family's socioeconomic ascent should be a shift from tenant to homeowner (Alba and Logan 1992). Spatial assimilation theory would further predict that same-group concentration should be inversely related to homeownership since ethnic enclaves are typically conceived of as poor rental zones (Fong and Gulia 1999; Myles and Hou 2004).

    Recent research (Alba and Nee 2003; Logan, Alba, and Zhang 2002), however, finds that some immigrant groups may be choosing against spatial assimilation to form more durable 'ethnic communities' (Logan, Alba, and Zhang 2002), giving rise to a positive and growing 'enclave effect' on homeownership (Borjas 2002). In this paper, an enclave effect is evaluated as an explanation for the 1996-2001 homeownership patterns of Toronto's 12 largest recent immigrant groups. Using longitudinally-consistent and temporally-antecedent 1996 neighbourhood ethnic composition data this paper aims to determine if immigrants buy homes outside their enclaves or prefer an owner-occupied neighbourhood of same-group members. To this end, the paper discusses the potential benefits of living and buying in an enclave; it develops a predictive framework for determining which groups might benefit from owner-occupied ethnic communities; it also examines the issue of 'neighbourhood disequilibrium' and evaluates the enclave effect on homeownership using a sample of recent (1996-2001) movers, their 1996 neighbourhood ethnic characteristics, and bivariate probit models with sample selection corrections (Van de Ven and Van Praag 1981).

    Release date: 2005-05-26

  • Table: 94F0048X
    Description:

    These profiles provide a statistical overview of Canada, presenting most of the univariate census variables for various levels of geography. The data for the census variables were collected from a 20% sample of the population, with the exception of the data for the age, sex and marital status variables, which were collected from the total population.

    Release date: 2005-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005247
    Description:

    This study undertakes three comparisons using Cycle 2 (1996-97) data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in Canada. First, the study compares the health outcomes of children of the Native-born Canadian (NBC) group with those of the immigrant group in general. Differences are also investigated within the three immigrant sub-groups: the American immigrant group, the European immigrant group and Asian immigrant group. Second, this study tests the hypothesis that the children of any immigrant group in Canada would have a higher level of health outcomes for the same level of resources. Third, the study examines the association of time of residency of immigrants in different groups and the health outcomes of their children. An immigrant family is defined as one in which at least one of the parents is foreign-born. Health outcomes are measured by the PMK's (person most knowledgeable about the child) assessment of the child's health. Ordered logit models are employed for estimation. The children selected for analysis are 4 to 13 years of age.

    The NLSCY data suggest that the health outcomes of children in the immigrant families in general are similar to that in the NBC group. However, the health outcomes of the Asian immigrant group are slightly lower and those of the American immigrant group are markedly better. Except for the American immigrant group, there is evidence that the children of any other immigrant group would have lower health status for the same level of resources. Decomposition results indicate that a higher level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for markedly better outcomes for the American immigrant group; while a lower level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for the lower level of outcomes for the Asian immigrant group. On the other hand, health outcomes are higher for the European immigrant group than for the NBC group when variation in resources is considered, while lower when variation in productivity coefficients is examined. Finally, there is statistical evidence that the health status of children of immigrant families would improve with the time of residency of immigrant parents, if it were lower initially. The findings of the study indicate that present health outcomes of children in the immigrant families, on average, are not a great concern. However, those of the Asian immigrant group may be a concern.

    Release date: 2005-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005244
    Description:

    This comparative study investigates the role of family background characteristics in postsecondary access in Canada and the United States. Given that postsecondary schooling is funded very differently in the two countries, family background may play substantively different roles. The findings suggest that university-going is less common among lower-income students and members of a visible minority group in the U.S. than among their Canadian counterparts. Some possible reasons are discussed.

    Release date: 2005-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2005002
    Description:

    This study examines links between changes in relationships with parents and peers during adolescence and adolescent depressive symptoms. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this study provides insight into: the relationships between youth and their mothers, fathers and friends; how these relationships changed over a two-year period; and how these changes related to depressive symptoms experienced by youth at ages 16 and 17.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005238
    Description:

    In the past, working-age immigrant families in Canada's large urban centres had higher homeownership rates than the Canadian-born. Over the past twenty years however, this advantage has reversed, due jointly to a drop in immigrant rates and a rise in the popularity of homeownership among the Canadian-born. This paper assesses the efficacy of standard consumer choice models, which include indicators for age, income, education, family type, plus several immigrant characteristics, to explain these changes. The main findings are that the standard model almost completely explains the immigrant homeownership advantage in 1981, as well as the rise over time among the Canadian-born, but even after accounting for the well-known decline in immigrant economic fortunes, only about one-third of the 1981-2001 immigrant change in homeownership rates is explained. The implications of this inability are discussed and several suggestions for further research are made.

    Release date: 2005-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005237
    Description:

    This research finds that family background (parental education level, family type, ethnicity, location) has important direct and indirect effects on post-secondary participation. The indirect effects of background operate through a set of intermediate variables representing high school outcomes and related attitudes and behaviours. Overall, the large fraction of the family background effect that operates through indirect channels indicates that the period of life before post-secondary financing and related issues become important is crucial for equitable and efficient post-secondary access. These results are based on two sex-specific measures of access (Any Post-secondary, and University) obtained from Statistics Canada's School Leavers and Follow-Up Surveys.

    Release date: 2005-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2004005
    Description:

    The report examines housing market trends and housing adequacy, suitability, affordability, and core housing need in Canada's census metropolitan areas (CMAs) from 1991 to 2001.

    It begins with a review of demographic and housing market trends, including changes in house prices, rents, and incomes during the 1990s and of factors underlying increasing housing demand late in the decade. Against this backdrop, subsequent chapters examine how well households living in CMAs were housed in 1991, 1996, and 2001. Households that do not live in acceptable housing and do not have sufficient income to afford such housing are deemed to be in core housing need. The last chapter of the report explores the spatial distribution of core housing need in CMAs in 2001 and the characteristics of neighbourhoods in which core housing need was most prevalent.

    This publication is not available. For more information, contact Andrew Heisz at 613-951-3748 or Sébastien Larochelle-Côté at 613-951-0803.

    Release date: 2005-01-05

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 94F0048X
    Description:

    These profiles provide a statistical overview of Canada, presenting most of the univariate census variables for various levels of geography. The data for the census variables were collected from a 20% sample of the population, with the exception of the data for the age, sex and marital status variables, which were collected from the total population.

    Release date: 2005-04-26

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005272
    Description:

    This paper makes use of matched tax-return data for daughters, their parents, their partners and their partners' parents to investigate the interactions between intergenerational mobility and marital matching for young couples in Canada. We show how assortative mating contributes to intergenerational household income persistence. The strength of the association between sons-in-law's income and women's parental income means that the intergenerational link between household incomes is stronger than that found for daughters' own incomes alone. This is also the case when viewed from the other side, so that daughters' and their partners' earnings are related to partners' parental income. These results indicate that assortative matching magnifies individual-level intergenerational persistence.

    In the second part of the paper we consider assortative mating by parental income. We find that daughter's parental income has an elasticity of almost 0.2 with respect to her partner's parental income. This association is of approximately the same magnitude as the intergenerational link between parents' and children's incomes. We investigate variations in the correlation between the parental incomes across several measured dimensions; cohabiting couples have lower correlations, as do those who form partnerships early, those who live in rural areas and most interestingly, those who later divorce. We interpret this last result as evidence that, on average, couples with parental incomes that are more similar enjoy a more stable match.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005267
    Description:

    We analyze the intergenerational income mobility of Canadians born to immigrants using the 2001 Census. A detailed portrait of the Canadian population is offered as are estimates of the degree of generational mobility among the children of immigrants from 70 countries. The degree of persistence as estimated in regression to the mean models is about the same for immigrants as for the entire population, and there is more generational mobility among immigrants in Canada than in the United States. We also use quantile regressions to distinguish between the role of social capital from other constraints limiting mobility and find that these are present and associated with father's education.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017961
    Description:

    Research consistently shows that delaying marriage tends to increase the likelihood that a person will never marry. After age 30, a single person may not wish to marry; it may seem less feasible or less desirable than it did when they were younger.

    This article looks at "mature singles," that is, men and women older than the average age at which people first marry (28 for women, 30 for men) but not yet past prime working-age (under 55). These men and women numbered over 1.1 million in 2001; they had never legally married and were not living common-law at the time of the survey. More than half a million of them did not think they would ever get married. The article examines some of the differences between those mature singles who do not expect to marry and those who do.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005252
    Description:

    Numerous studies equate immigrant homeownership with assimilation into the residential mainstream, though only rarely is this claim verified by studying the ethnic character of neighbourhoods where immigrants actually buy homes. In this paper, the 1996 and 2001 Census of Canada master files and bivariate probit models with sample selection corrections (a.k.a. Heckman probit models) are used to assess the neighbourhood-level ethnic determinants of homeownership in Toronto, Canada. By determining whether low levels of ethnic concentration accompany a home purchase, it can be assessed whether immigrants exit their enclaves in search of a home in the 'promised land', as traditional assimilation theory suggests, or if some now seek homes in the 'ethnic communities' that Logan, Alba and Zhang (2002) recently introduced in the American Sociological Review. Assessing the role of concentration under equilibrium conditions, evidence emerges that same-group concentration affects the propensity of several group members to buy homes.

    Release date: 2005-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005253
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled Are immigrants buying to get in? The role of ethnic clustering on the homeownership propensities of 12 Toronto immigrant groups, 1996-2001. Spatial assimilation theory is a model of status attainment that links the spatial and social positions of minority group members (Massey and Denton 1985). If applied to immigrants, the model would suggest that immigrants would first cluster in typically poor neighbourhoods with high concentrations of co-ethnics, but that ethnic concentration should be temporary and of declining utility. Once an immigrant family's socioeconomic status improves, they should merge into the residential 'mainstream' by moving to a better, and typically less segregated, neighbourhood (Massey and Denton 1985). Further, although housing tenure is not an explicit dimension of spatial assimilation theory, given the well-established relationship between income, human capital and homeownership (Balakrishnan and Wu 1992; Laryea 1999), and the importance of homeownership as an indicator of well-being and residential assimilation (Myers and Lee 1998), part of an immigrant family's socioeconomic ascent should be a shift from tenant to homeowner (Alba and Logan 1992). Spatial assimilation theory would further predict that same-group concentration should be inversely related to homeownership since ethnic enclaves are typically conceived of as poor rental zones (Fong and Gulia 1999; Myles and Hou 2004).

    Recent research (Alba and Nee 2003; Logan, Alba, and Zhang 2002), however, finds that some immigrant groups may be choosing against spatial assimilation to form more durable 'ethnic communities' (Logan, Alba, and Zhang 2002), giving rise to a positive and growing 'enclave effect' on homeownership (Borjas 2002). In this paper, an enclave effect is evaluated as an explanation for the 1996-2001 homeownership patterns of Toronto's 12 largest recent immigrant groups. Using longitudinally-consistent and temporally-antecedent 1996 neighbourhood ethnic composition data this paper aims to determine if immigrants buy homes outside their enclaves or prefer an owner-occupied neighbourhood of same-group members. To this end, the paper discusses the potential benefits of living and buying in an enclave; it develops a predictive framework for determining which groups might benefit from owner-occupied ethnic communities; it also examines the issue of 'neighbourhood disequilibrium' and evaluates the enclave effect on homeownership using a sample of recent (1996-2001) movers, their 1996 neighbourhood ethnic characteristics, and bivariate probit models with sample selection corrections (Van de Ven and Van Praag 1981).

    Release date: 2005-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005247
    Description:

    This study undertakes three comparisons using Cycle 2 (1996-97) data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) in Canada. First, the study compares the health outcomes of children of the Native-born Canadian (NBC) group with those of the immigrant group in general. Differences are also investigated within the three immigrant sub-groups: the American immigrant group, the European immigrant group and Asian immigrant group. Second, this study tests the hypothesis that the children of any immigrant group in Canada would have a higher level of health outcomes for the same level of resources. Third, the study examines the association of time of residency of immigrants in different groups and the health outcomes of their children. An immigrant family is defined as one in which at least one of the parents is foreign-born. Health outcomes are measured by the PMK's (person most knowledgeable about the child) assessment of the child's health. Ordered logit models are employed for estimation. The children selected for analysis are 4 to 13 years of age.

    The NLSCY data suggest that the health outcomes of children in the immigrant families in general are similar to that in the NBC group. However, the health outcomes of the Asian immigrant group are slightly lower and those of the American immigrant group are markedly better. Except for the American immigrant group, there is evidence that the children of any other immigrant group would have lower health status for the same level of resources. Decomposition results indicate that a higher level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for markedly better outcomes for the American immigrant group; while a lower level of observable and unobservable resources is responsible for the lower level of outcomes for the Asian immigrant group. On the other hand, health outcomes are higher for the European immigrant group than for the NBC group when variation in resources is considered, while lower when variation in productivity coefficients is examined. Finally, there is statistical evidence that the health status of children of immigrant families would improve with the time of residency of immigrant parents, if it were lower initially. The findings of the study indicate that present health outcomes of children in the immigrant families, on average, are not a great concern. However, those of the Asian immigrant group may be a concern.

    Release date: 2005-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005244
    Description:

    This comparative study investigates the role of family background characteristics in postsecondary access in Canada and the United States. Given that postsecondary schooling is funded very differently in the two countries, family background may play substantively different roles. The findings suggest that university-going is less common among lower-income students and members of a visible minority group in the U.S. than among their Canadian counterparts. Some possible reasons are discussed.

    Release date: 2005-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2005002
    Description:

    This study examines links between changes in relationships with parents and peers during adolescence and adolescent depressive symptoms. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this study provides insight into: the relationships between youth and their mothers, fathers and friends; how these relationships changed over a two-year period; and how these changes related to depressive symptoms experienced by youth at ages 16 and 17.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005238
    Description:

    In the past, working-age immigrant families in Canada's large urban centres had higher homeownership rates than the Canadian-born. Over the past twenty years however, this advantage has reversed, due jointly to a drop in immigrant rates and a rise in the popularity of homeownership among the Canadian-born. This paper assesses the efficacy of standard consumer choice models, which include indicators for age, income, education, family type, plus several immigrant characteristics, to explain these changes. The main findings are that the standard model almost completely explains the immigrant homeownership advantage in 1981, as well as the rise over time among the Canadian-born, but even after accounting for the well-known decline in immigrant economic fortunes, only about one-third of the 1981-2001 immigrant change in homeownership rates is explained. The implications of this inability are discussed and several suggestions for further research are made.

    Release date: 2005-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005237
    Description:

    This research finds that family background (parental education level, family type, ethnicity, location) has important direct and indirect effects on post-secondary participation. The indirect effects of background operate through a set of intermediate variables representing high school outcomes and related attitudes and behaviours. Overall, the large fraction of the family background effect that operates through indirect channels indicates that the period of life before post-secondary financing and related issues become important is crucial for equitable and efficient post-secondary access. These results are based on two sex-specific measures of access (Any Post-secondary, and University) obtained from Statistics Canada's School Leavers and Follow-Up Surveys.

    Release date: 2005-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2004005
    Description:

    The report examines housing market trends and housing adequacy, suitability, affordability, and core housing need in Canada's census metropolitan areas (CMAs) from 1991 to 2001.

    It begins with a review of demographic and housing market trends, including changes in house prices, rents, and incomes during the 1990s and of factors underlying increasing housing demand late in the decade. Against this backdrop, subsequent chapters examine how well households living in CMAs were housed in 1991, 1996, and 2001. Households that do not live in acceptable housing and do not have sufficient income to afford such housing are deemed to be in core housing need. The last chapter of the report explores the spatial distribution of core housing need in CMAs in 2001 and the characteristics of neighbourhoods in which core housing need was most prevalent.

    This publication is not available. For more information, contact Andrew Heisz at 613-951-3748 or Sébastien Larochelle-Côté at 613-951-0803.

    Release date: 2005-01-05

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005007
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2005-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005006
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2003 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2005010
    Description:

    For some time, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) has used data on housing characteristics and housing-related expenditures from the Census of Population. Although the Census data source serves CMHC's purposes to a large extent, the federal government agency turned to the annual household surveys of Statistics Canada to provide information on a more frequent basis. This would allow them to have a better picture of annual trends, and perhaps have a greater choice of other characteristics with which to cross housing data on Canadian households. In 2001, CMHC began to sponsor additional content in both the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), starting with reference year 2002.

    Release date: 2005-07-22

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