Statistics by subject – Families, households and housing

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All (21)

All (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Table: 62F0043X
    Description:

    This table presents the estimated number of households having, and the percentage of households reporting, certain dwelling characteristics and household equipment for Canada by housing tenure (owners/renters). The dwelling characteristics presented include the type of dwelling, whether repairs are needed, tenure (owned or rented), year of move, period of construction, number of rooms and bathrooms, and the age and type of heating equipment and fuel used. The household equipment presented includes household appliances, communications and entertainment equipment, and the number of vehicles owned. The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999. The data are from the Survey of Household Spending.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Table: 62F0044X
    Description:

    This table presents the estimated number of households having, and the percentage of households reporting, certain dwelling characteristics and household equipment for Canada by household type. The dwelling characteristics presented include the type of dwelling, whether repairs are needed, tenure (owned or rented), year of move, period of construction, number of rooms and bathrooms, and the age and type of heating equipment and fuel used. The household equipment presented includes household appliances, communications and entertainment equipment, and the number of vehicles owned. The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999. The data are from the Survey of Household Spending.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Table: 62F0045X
    Description:

    This table presents the estimated number of households having, and the percentage of households reporting, certain dwelling characteristics and household equipment for Canada by size of area of residence (rural/urban). The dwelling characteristics presented include the type of dwelling, whether repairs are needed, tenure (owned or rented), year of move, period of construction, number of rooms and bathrooms, and the age and type of heating equipment and fuel used. The household equipment presented includes household appliances, communications and entertainment equipment, and the number of vehicles owned. The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999. The data are from the Survey of Household Spending.

    Release date: 2010-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211165
    Description:

    This article examines family status of fathers in Canada. The sociodemographic, family and conjugal characteristics of fathers are analyzed to illustrate the many faces of fathers. The data from this analysis are taken from two different cycles of the General Social Survey on the family: Cycle 10 from 1995 and Cycle 20 from 2006.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010325
    Description:

    Homeownership affects investment, consumption, and savings decisions of households, and plays a major role in post-retirement well-being. This paper examines two questions. First, to what extent do Canadians acquire and retain homeownership at different life-course stages, particularly after retirement? Second, has the age profile of homeownership changed over generations?

    Using data from eight Canadian censuses of population, conducted between 1971 and 2006, we find a strong regularity in the age profile of homeownership across generations of Canadians. The homeownership rate rises quickly with the age of household maintainers (i.e., the person(s) who pay(s) for shelter costs) in the period before the age of 40, and continues to climb thereafter at a slower pace until reaching the plateau near age 65, when about three quarters of Canadian households own their homes. We find that the homeownership rate changes little from age 65 to 74 but starts declining after age 75. As well, we note that the level at which homeownership plateaus has risen steadily across birth cohorts since the 1970s.

    Release date: 2010-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111158
    Description:

    This article explores the processing of divorce cases in civil courts in seven provinces and territories: Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Using information from the Civil Court Survey, the article examines some of the key aspects associated with divorce cases, including the volume of cases, the types of court activity associated with the cases, and the length of time taken to process and reach decisions in these cases. Issues identified in these divorce cases, such as access, custody, property and support, are also examined.

    Release date: 2010-05-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010003
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2006 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2004 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2010002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2005 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2010-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Public use microdata: 12M0022X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 22 (2008) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. Cycle 22 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions. The survey covered a range of topics such as social networks, and social and civic participation. Information was also collected on major changes in respondents' lives in the last 12 months, the resources they used during these transitions and unmet needs for help. Questions were also asked on trust, sense of belonging, volunteering and unpaid work.

    Release date: 2010-03-05

  • Public use microdata: 95M0028X
    Description:

    This individuals file provides data on the characteristics of the population. The 2006 Census Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) contain samples of anonymous responses to the 2006 Census questionnaire. The files have been carefully scrutinized to ensure the complete confidentiality of the individual responses.

    Microdata files are unique among census products in that they give users access to non-aggregated data. The PUMFs user can group and manipulate these variables to suit data and research requirements. Tabulations excluded from other census products can be created or relationships between variables can be analysed using different statistical tests. PUMFs provide quick access to a comprehensive social and economic database about Canada and its people.

    Most of the subject matter covered by the census is included in the microdata files. To ensure the respondents' anonymity, geographic identifiers have been restricted to provinces/territories and large metropolitan areas.

    With 123 variables, this comprehensive tool is excellent for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modelling and performing statistical regression analysis using census data.

    Note: Users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages such as SAS or SPSS to be able to use the data contained in these files.

    Release date: 2010-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000211122
    Description:

    A look how age, income and family structure affects homeownership over time.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

Data (10)

Data (10) (10 of 10 results)

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211335
    Description:

    Women have made substantial gains in education over the last few decades and are now more likely to have a university degree than men. At the same time, the conjugal situation of female university graduates has changed considerably. Using data from the 1981 to 2006 Censuses, this article examines how the propensity to form unions (marriage or common-law) has changed for women with university degrees compared to those without a university education. It also compares the incidence of female university graduates forming unions with similarly educated males over time.

    Release date: 2010-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211165
    Description:

    This article examines family status of fathers in Canada. The sociodemographic, family and conjugal characteristics of fathers are analyzed to illustrate the many faces of fathers. The data from this analysis are taken from two different cycles of the General Social Survey on the family: Cycle 10 from 1995 and Cycle 20 from 2006.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010325
    Description:

    Homeownership affects investment, consumption, and savings decisions of households, and plays a major role in post-retirement well-being. This paper examines two questions. First, to what extent do Canadians acquire and retain homeownership at different life-course stages, particularly after retirement? Second, has the age profile of homeownership changed over generations?

    Using data from eight Canadian censuses of population, conducted between 1971 and 2006, we find a strong regularity in the age profile of homeownership across generations of Canadians. The homeownership rate rises quickly with the age of household maintainers (i.e., the person(s) who pay(s) for shelter costs) in the period before the age of 40, and continues to climb thereafter at a slower pace until reaching the plateau near age 65, when about three quarters of Canadian households own their homes. We find that the homeownership rate changes little from age 65 to 74 but starts declining after age 75. As well, we note that the level at which homeownership plateaus has risen steadily across birth cohorts since the 1970s.

    Release date: 2010-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111158
    Description:

    This article explores the processing of divorce cases in civil courts in seven provinces and territories: Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Using information from the Civil Court Survey, the article examines some of the key aspects associated with divorce cases, including the volume of cases, the types of court activity associated with the cases, and the length of time taken to process and reach decisions in these cases. Issues identified in these divorce cases, such as access, custody, property and support, are also examined.

    Release date: 2010-05-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111143
    Description:

    As Canada's population continues to become ethnoculturally diverse, there is greater opportunity for individuals to form conjugal relationships with someone from a different ethnocultural background. In this study, a mixed union, either marital or common-law, is based on one of two criteria: either one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group and the other does not; or the couple belongs to different visible minority groups. Using data primarily from the 2006 Census of Population, this study examines the socio-demographic characteristics of mixed union couples in Canada. Studying mixed unions is important not only because these relationships reflect another aspect of the diversity of families today, but also for their implications in terms of social inclusion and identification with one or more visible minority groups, particularly for subsequent generations.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000211122
    Description:

    A look how age, income and family structure affects homeownership over time.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

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