Statistics by subject – Lifestyle and social conditions

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All (22)

All (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154860
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about fruit and vegetable consumption among Canadians aged 12 and older. The results shown are based on Canadian Community Health Survey questions that measured the number of times respondents reported that they consumed fruit and vegetables, rather than the actual quantity consumed.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154862
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about life satisfaction among Canadians. Life satisfaction is a personal subjective assessment of global well-being. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154865
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about different positive health behaviours among Canadians aged 18 and older. These behaviours are combined into a single score. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154864
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about smoking among Canadians aged 12 and older. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154861
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about heavy drinking among Canadians aged 12 and older. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700614827
    Description:

    This analysis examines associations between measured and reported parent and child physical activity and sedentary behaviour in a sample of 1,328 biological parent-child pairs from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007 through 2013). Parental role modeling and support for physical activity, adjusted for household lifestyle habits and socio-demographic characteristics, are considered.

    Release date: 2017-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700614828
    Description:

    Using measured data for 1,563 biological parent-child pairs collected by the Canadian Health Measures Survey, this study examines parent and child BMI in a nationally representative sample of Canadian children.

    Release date: 2017-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201700114783
    Description:

    This article presents findings on aerobic fitness and body mass index and the relationship with health-related risk factors such as high blood pressure. Results are presented for adults aged 20 to 59. Data are from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2017-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700214773
    Description:

    Based on results of the 1991, 2001 and 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this study examines trends in daily smoking, occasional smoking and non-smoking among Inuit aged 15 or older, by selected characteristics. For daily smokers, the average number of cigarettes smoked per day and the average age of daily smoking initiation are also investigated.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201301111877
    Description:

    This population-based analysis uses a group-based modelling approach to identify several distinct trajectories in a large, nationally representative sample of Canadian adults.

    Release date: 2013-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411740
    Description:

    This article compares examines changes in smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption and diet in a representative sample of Canadians aged 50 or older diagnosed with a major chronic condition.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200111615
    Description:

    This study uses a large, population-based longitudinal sample of adults to examine: whether inactive Canadians aged 40 or older who are free of vascular disease become active after a new vascular diagnosis; factors associated with becoming active during leisure time; and changes or intentions to change health behaviours, including physical activity, among the newly diagnosed.

    Release date: 2012-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100211426
    Description:

    This study examines the association between neighbourhood income and the diagnosis of female breast cancer. Population data from the Canadian Cancer Registry were used to calculate national age-specific and age-standardized rates of breast cancer from 1992 through 2004 by neighbourhood income quintile and region.

    Release date: 2011-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900410934
    Description:

    This study compares several major risk factors and chronic conditions in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations not living on reserves in the North (Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut) and in southern Canada at two time points. The data are from cycle 1.1 (2000/2001) and cycle 3.1 (2005/2006) of the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2009-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713168
    Description:

    As in Europe and other parts of North America, compensation claims for lost workdays in Canada have generally declined. Although this event is encouraging, the rate of decrease may not be uniform for all age groups, industries or regions. Workplace injuries among young workers aged 15 to 24 are of particular interest in this look at injury claim rates in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (Ontario) WorkSafeBC (British Columbia)

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018439
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that unhealthy behaviours may have a delayed effect, catching up to seniors

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018440
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that recent immigrants from non-European countries are twice as likely as the Canadian-born to experience deterioration in their health.

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016720
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to analyse the influence of community on individual health. The new Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) was used to derive individual health variables for Canadian residents aged 18 or older while community-level data were obtained from the Canadian 1996 Census of Population. Weighted logistic multilevel models and principal component analysis were used to analyse these data. After controlling for individual variables, there was little variation between communities. However, the influence of the community was more important for people with low family income than those with higher income.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016322
    Description:

    The study examined the characteristics of people who reported their health as poor or fair in the Canadian Community Health Survey of 2000/01. The results expand on the conclusions of an article titled "The health of Canada's communities," released in The daily on July 4. That article found that self-perceived health status differed substantially between health regions and that regional socio-economic factors were clearly associated with average health status in each region. People living in large metropolitan areas and urban centres, where education levels are high, had the highest life expectancies in all of Canada. At the other end of the spectrum, people living in remote northern communities, where education levels are lower, had poorer health.

    This new article examines the extent to which this regional variation is attributable to the composition of the population within each health region, rather than to the socio-economic context of the region.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005744
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is to measure the effect of smoking on disability-free life expectancy in the Canadian population. Although it has been established that eliminating smoking would increase life expectancy, the impact on the quality of the years lived has been less clearly described.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014025
    Description:

    Socio-economic status - as measured by income, education and occupation - is a complex phenomenon used to describe social inequities. It is well known that people in lower socioeconomic categories experience higher mortality rates and poorer health than those further up the social ladder. In addition, differences in health by socio-economic status are most pronounced in early and late mid- life. However, it is not clearly understood why this is so.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042817
    Description:

    The sense of coherence a healthy outlook can be thought of as a mesure of positive health, that is, a factor promoting resilience which enables and individual to remain healthy. Based on National Population Health Survey (NPHS) data, three health measures were analyzed in relation to sense of coherence. The sense of coherence accounted for a substancial proportion of the total variance for two of the three measures. Theoretically, people with a healthy outlook are more able to cope successfully with trauma and stress. According to NPHS data, on average, those who reported at least one traumatic event had a lower sense of coherence than those who did not. For people who experienced trauma during childhood and young adulthood, yet had strong sense of coherence, the impact of that trauma on their health was diminished.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

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Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154860
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about fruit and vegetable consumption among Canadians aged 12 and older. The results shown are based on Canadian Community Health Survey questions that measured the number of times respondents reported that they consumed fruit and vegetables, rather than the actual quantity consumed.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154862
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about life satisfaction among Canadians. Life satisfaction is a personal subjective assessment of global well-being. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154865
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about different positive health behaviours among Canadians aged 18 and older. These behaviours are combined into a single score. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154864
    Description:

    This is a health fact sheet about smoking among Canadians aged 12 and older. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-625-X201700154861
    Description:

    This is a Health fact sheet about heavy drinking among Canadians aged 12 and older. The results shown are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700614827
    Description:

    This analysis examines associations between measured and reported parent and child physical activity and sedentary behaviour in a sample of 1,328 biological parent-child pairs from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007 through 2013). Parental role modeling and support for physical activity, adjusted for household lifestyle habits and socio-demographic characteristics, are considered.

    Release date: 2017-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700614828
    Description:

    Using measured data for 1,563 biological parent-child pairs collected by the Canadian Health Measures Survey, this study examines parent and child BMI in a nationally representative sample of Canadian children.

    Release date: 2017-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201700114783
    Description:

    This article presents findings on aerobic fitness and body mass index and the relationship with health-related risk factors such as high blood pressure. Results are presented for adults aged 20 to 59. Data are from the Canadian Health Measures Survey.

    Release date: 2017-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700214773
    Description:

    Based on results of the 1991, 2001 and 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this study examines trends in daily smoking, occasional smoking and non-smoking among Inuit aged 15 or older, by selected characteristics. For daily smokers, the average number of cigarettes smoked per day and the average age of daily smoking initiation are also investigated.

    Release date: 2017-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201301111877
    Description:

    This population-based analysis uses a group-based modelling approach to identify several distinct trajectories in a large, nationally representative sample of Canadian adults.

    Release date: 2013-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200411740
    Description:

    This article compares examines changes in smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption and diet in a representative sample of Canadians aged 50 or older diagnosed with a major chronic condition.

    Release date: 2012-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201200111615
    Description:

    This study uses a large, population-based longitudinal sample of adults to examine: whether inactive Canadians aged 40 or older who are free of vascular disease become active after a new vascular diagnosis; factors associated with becoming active during leisure time; and changes or intentions to change health behaviours, including physical activity, among the newly diagnosed.

    Release date: 2012-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100211426
    Description:

    This study examines the association between neighbourhood income and the diagnosis of female breast cancer. Population data from the Canadian Cancer Registry were used to calculate national age-specific and age-standardized rates of breast cancer from 1992 through 2004 by neighbourhood income quintile and region.

    Release date: 2011-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900410934
    Description:

    This study compares several major risk factors and chronic conditions in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations not living on reserves in the North (Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut) and in southern Canada at two time points. The data are from cycle 1.1 (2000/2001) and cycle 3.1 (2005/2006) of the Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2009-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713168
    Description:

    As in Europe and other parts of North America, compensation claims for lost workdays in Canada have generally declined. Although this event is encouraging, the rate of decrease may not be uniform for all age groups, industries or regions. Workplace injuries among young workers aged 15 to 24 are of particular interest in this look at injury claim rates in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (Ontario) WorkSafeBC (British Columbia)

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018439
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that unhealthy behaviours may have a delayed effect, catching up to seniors

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20050018440
    Description:

    This summary provides highlights of an analysis that used eight years of longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey, 1994/95 to 2002/03. The analysis was part of an Internet publication Healthy Today, Healthy Tomorrow? Findings from the National Population Health Survey, Catalogue no. 82-618-MWE.

    The analysis found that recent immigrants from non-European countries are twice as likely as the Canadian-born to experience deterioration in their health.

    Release date: 2005-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005744
    Description:

    The purpose of this article is to measure the effect of smoking on disability-free life expectancy in the Canadian population. Although it has been established that eliminating smoking would increase life expectancy, the impact on the quality of the years lived has been less clearly described.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014025
    Description:

    Socio-economic status - as measured by income, education and occupation - is a complex phenomenon used to describe social inequities. It is well known that people in lower socioeconomic categories experience higher mortality rates and poorer health than those further up the social ladder. In addition, differences in health by socio-economic status are most pronounced in early and late mid- life. However, it is not clearly understood why this is so.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950042817
    Description:

    The sense of coherence a healthy outlook can be thought of as a mesure of positive health, that is, a factor promoting resilience which enables and individual to remain healthy. Based on National Population Health Survey (NPHS) data, three health measures were analyzed in relation to sense of coherence. The sense of coherence accounted for a substancial proportion of the total variance for two of the three measures. Theoretically, people with a healthy outlook are more able to cope successfully with trauma and stress. According to NPHS data, on average, those who reported at least one traumatic event had a lower sense of coherence than those who did not. For people who experienced trauma during childhood and young adulthood, yet had strong sense of coherence, the impact of that trauma on their health was diminished.

    Release date: 1996-04-02

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016720
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to analyse the influence of community on individual health. The new Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) was used to derive individual health variables for Canadian residents aged 18 or older while community-level data were obtained from the Canadian 1996 Census of Population. Weighted logistic multilevel models and principal component analysis were used to analyse these data. After controlling for individual variables, there was little variation between communities. However, the influence of the community was more important for people with low family income than those with higher income.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Technical products: 11-522-X20020016322
    Description:

    The study examined the characteristics of people who reported their health as poor or fair in the Canadian Community Health Survey of 2000/01. The results expand on the conclusions of an article titled "The health of Canada's communities," released in The daily on July 4. That article found that self-perceived health status differed substantially between health regions and that regional socio-economic factors were clearly associated with average health status in each region. People living in large metropolitan areas and urban centres, where education levels are high, had the highest life expectancies in all of Canada. At the other end of the spectrum, people living in remote northern communities, where education levels are lower, had poorer health.

    This new article examines the extent to which this regional variation is attributable to the composition of the population within each health region, rather than to the socio-economic context of the region.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

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