Statistics by subject – Lifestyle and social conditions

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (5)

All (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009228
    Description:

    This study identifies determinants that promote dependence-free aging, an important topic as the large cohorts of baby-boomers grow older.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002006
    Description:

    The health of Canada's rural people has gained increased attention over the past few years as studies have shown that the health status of those living in rural and remote regions of Canada is lagging behind that of urban residents. The objective of this analysis is to compare a number of key health indicators between rural and urban regions in Canada to determine if the type of region in which a person lives is associated with the health of the population

    The analysis for this report is based on data acquired from Statistic Canada's 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey population is segmented into four types of metropolitan regions (large metro-central, large metro-fringe, mid-sized metro and small metro) and four types of non-metropolitan regions (small cities, towns, rural and northern).

    This study finds that the self-rated health of Canadians (those reporting their health as excellent) declines from the most urban regions of the nation to the most rural and remote parts. The research points to personal health risk factors including being overweight (i.e., high body mass index) and smoking as being significantly higher in small town regions, rural regions and northern regions of Canada. In addition, the northern regions of Canada show a significantly higher than average share of the population who have high blood pressure or suffer from major depressive episodes. Rural regions (non-metro-adjacent) and small metropolitan regions have a higher than average prevalence of arthritis/rheumatism, even after standardizing for age.

    Release date: 2003-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020036573
    Description:

    This analysis integrates data for age at smoking initiation, smoking patterns (ever/never smokers), and number of cigarettes smoked by age and gender from 13 Canadian population-based health surveys. Data for cohorts of individuals born between 1910 and 1985 were combined into a single dataset to analyze changes in smoking behaviour.The proportion of males and females who stated that they were current smokers declined considerably over the years; the proportion labelling themselves as former smokers has increased; and recent cohorts are smoking fewer cigarettes than those born earlier in the century. Although prevalence rates vary across birth cohorts, the pattern of use within each cohort is fairly similar, peaking during the middle years.Females are now starting to smoke at a much younger age than females born early in the twentieth century. Males are starting at a slightly younger age than in earlier cohorts. Since the first survey, more males than females have consistently stated that they were current smokers, although this gap has closed over time. The most recent survey data suggest that the gender gap for age at initiation and smoking rates is now very modest.This analysis contributes information about smoking patterns over time to a large integrative framework about population health in Canada: the Population Health Impact of Disease, Injury, and Health Determinants in Canada (PHI).

    Release date: 2003-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016532
    Description:

    This article provides an up-to-date profile of shift workers and studies their physical and mental health.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009228
    Description:

    This study identifies determinants that promote dependence-free aging, an important topic as the large cohorts of baby-boomers grow older.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002006
    Description:

    The health of Canada's rural people has gained increased attention over the past few years as studies have shown that the health status of those living in rural and remote regions of Canada is lagging behind that of urban residents. The objective of this analysis is to compare a number of key health indicators between rural and urban regions in Canada to determine if the type of region in which a person lives is associated with the health of the population

    The analysis for this report is based on data acquired from Statistic Canada's 2000/01 Canadian Community Health Survey. The survey population is segmented into four types of metropolitan regions (large metro-central, large metro-fringe, mid-sized metro and small metro) and four types of non-metropolitan regions (small cities, towns, rural and northern).

    This study finds that the self-rated health of Canadians (those reporting their health as excellent) declines from the most urban regions of the nation to the most rural and remote parts. The research points to personal health risk factors including being overweight (i.e., high body mass index) and smoking as being significantly higher in small town regions, rural regions and northern regions of Canada. In addition, the northern regions of Canada show a significantly higher than average share of the population who have high blood pressure or suffer from major depressive episodes. Rural regions (non-metro-adjacent) and small metropolitan regions have a higher than average prevalence of arthritis/rheumatism, even after standardizing for age.

    Release date: 2003-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020036573
    Description:

    This analysis integrates data for age at smoking initiation, smoking patterns (ever/never smokers), and number of cigarettes smoked by age and gender from 13 Canadian population-based health surveys. Data for cohorts of individuals born between 1910 and 1985 were combined into a single dataset to analyze changes in smoking behaviour.The proportion of males and females who stated that they were current smokers declined considerably over the years; the proportion labelling themselves as former smokers has increased; and recent cohorts are smoking fewer cigarettes than those born earlier in the century. Although prevalence rates vary across birth cohorts, the pattern of use within each cohort is fairly similar, peaking during the middle years.Females are now starting to smoke at a much younger age than females born early in the twentieth century. Males are starting at a slightly younger age than in earlier cohorts. Since the first survey, more males than females have consistently stated that they were current smokers, although this gap has closed over time. The most recent survey data suggest that the gender gap for age at initiation and smoking rates is now very modest.This analysis contributes information about smoking patterns over time to a large integrative framework about population health in Canada: the Population Health Impact of Disease, Injury, and Health Determinants in Canada (PHI).

    Release date: 2003-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016532
    Description:

    This article provides an up-to-date profile of shift workers and studies their physical and mental health.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: