Statistics by subject – Lifestyle and social conditions

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (12)

All (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2006005
    Description:

    This article examines changes in weight over two-year intervals from 1996/1997 to 2004/2005 among Canadians aged 18 to 64 years. Using data from the longitudinal National Population Health Survey (NPHS), average weight change over four two-year intervals was examined for men and women by age group and body mass index (BMI) group. This article is part of the NPHS release and provides links to tables, other research articles and information about the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2006-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049496
    Description:

    In 2002, close to 9% of workers were dissatisfied with their jobs. Evening and night shift workers were more likely to be dissatisfied than were those with a regular daytime schedule. Dissatisfaction was more common among men who worked part time, but less common among women who worked part time. Dissatisfied workers tended to report more disability days than did those who were satisfied with their jobs.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049495
    Description:

    This article describes stress levels among the employed population aged 18 to 75 and examines associations between stress and depression.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060029294
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents results from a population-based study of birth outcomes in Quebec from 1991 to 2000. Rates of adverse birth outcomes increased across successively poorer neighbourhood income groups, and across successively lower levels of maternal education, for five outcomes: preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, neonatal death, and postneonatal death.

    Release date: 2006-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713168
    Description:

    As in Europe and other parts of North America, compensation claims for lost workdays in Canada have generally declined. Although this event is encouraging, the rate of decrease may not be uniform for all age groups, industries or regions. Workplace injuries among young workers aged 15 to 24 are of particular interest in this look at injury claim rates in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (Ontario) WorkSafeBC (British Columbia)

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-620-M2006002
    Description:

    This report presents the results of the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey on nutrition. It takes a comprehensive look at what Canadians are eating: how many calories they consume; whether they get an adequate number of servings of vegetables and fruit, milk products, meat and alternative and grain products, as recommended in Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating for People Four Years Old and Over; and what percentage of their diet consists of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. The report also compares CCHS nutrition data with the conclusions of the 1970-1972 Nutrition Canada Survey. In addition, it examines regional and economic differences in consumption patterns.

    Release date: 2006-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610413162
    Description:

    Some 720,000 work absences of two weeks or longer due to illness or disability were reported in 2003, 200,000 of which were work-related. With a median duration of 11 weeks, each of these long-term absences costs roughly $8,800. Furthermore, absences lasting upwards of four months were generally associated with negative health, stress, career stagnation, and heightened chances of being on leave again the following year.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Technical products: 82-621-X2006002
    Description:

    This issue examines smoking trends from 2000/01 to 2005 for the population aged 12 or older, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. This issue also presents diabetes prevalence by age, sex and province or territory for the population aged 12 and over, using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2006-06-13

  • Technical products: 82-621-X20060029226
    Description:

    This article examines smoking trends from 2000/01 to 2005 for the population aged 12 or older, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Smoking prevalence is compared by age, sex and province. Proportions of the population living in households where smoking is totally banned are presented, as well as percentages of the employed population who face smoking bans at work. Exposure rates to second-hand smoke among non-smokers are examined. The article also presents estimates of these characteristics at the health region level.

    Release date: 2006-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610213157
    Description:

    While the majority of Canadians aged 50 to 69 not in the labour force were retired in 2003, nearly half a million were not working for health-related reasons. The Canadian Community Health Survey is used to compare the health of working individuals aged 50 to 69 with their contemporaries who are not working, whether for health or other reasons. Chronic conditions and lifestyle choices are also examined.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-618-M2006005
    Description:

    This article examines changes in weight over two-year intervals from 1996/1997 to 2004/2005 among Canadians aged 18 to 64 years. Using data from the longitudinal National Population Health Survey (NPHS), average weight change over four two-year intervals was examined for men and women by age group and body mass index (BMI) group. This article is part of the NPHS release and provides links to tables, other research articles and information about the National Population Health Survey.

    Release date: 2006-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049496
    Description:

    In 2002, close to 9% of workers were dissatisfied with their jobs. Evening and night shift workers were more likely to be dissatisfied than were those with a regular daytime schedule. Dissatisfaction was more common among men who worked part time, but less common among women who worked part time. Dissatisfied workers tended to report more disability days than did those who were satisfied with their jobs.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049495
    Description:

    This article describes stress levels among the employed population aged 18 to 75 and examines associations between stress and depression.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20060029294
    Description:

    This newsletter article presents results from a population-based study of birth outcomes in Quebec from 1991 to 2000. Rates of adverse birth outcomes increased across successively poorer neighbourhood income groups, and across successively lower levels of maternal education, for five outcomes: preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, neonatal death, and postneonatal death.

    Release date: 2006-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713168
    Description:

    As in Europe and other parts of North America, compensation claims for lost workdays in Canada have generally declined. Although this event is encouraging, the rate of decrease may not be uniform for all age groups, industries or regions. Workplace injuries among young workers aged 15 to 24 are of particular interest in this look at injury claim rates in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (Ontario) WorkSafeBC (British Columbia)

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-620-M2006002
    Description:

    This report presents the results of the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey on nutrition. It takes a comprehensive look at what Canadians are eating: how many calories they consume; whether they get an adequate number of servings of vegetables and fruit, milk products, meat and alternative and grain products, as recommended in Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating for People Four Years Old and Over; and what percentage of their diet consists of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. The report also compares CCHS nutrition data with the conclusions of the 1970-1972 Nutrition Canada Survey. In addition, it examines regional and economic differences in consumption patterns.

    Release date: 2006-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610413162
    Description:

    Some 720,000 work absences of two weeks or longer due to illness or disability were reported in 2003, 200,000 of which were work-related. With a median duration of 11 weeks, each of these long-term absences costs roughly $8,800. Furthermore, absences lasting upwards of four months were generally associated with negative health, stress, career stagnation, and heightened chances of being on leave again the following year.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610213157
    Description:

    While the majority of Canadians aged 50 to 69 not in the labour force were retired in 2003, nearly half a million were not working for health-related reasons. The Canadian Community Health Survey is used to compare the health of working individuals aged 50 to 69 with their contemporaries who are not working, whether for health or other reasons. Chronic conditions and lifestyle choices are also examined.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-581-X
    Description:

    This report briefly describes over 100 long-term medical follow-up studies covering topics over the complete life cycle including most age groups and diseases. The research projects examine delayed health outcomes in relation to occupational, environmental, lifestyle, medical and socio-economic factors.

    This inventory of projects carried out since 1978, searchable by themes, will aid in determining earlier research completed using record linkage plus national birth, cancer and death databases for Canada. It outlines the agencies involved, the main investigators at the time of the work, the size of the study population, and provides citations to published findings. This report will be useful for those who make or influence policies, regulations and medical guidelines, and carry out research that affects the health of the population at the industry, community, regional, national or international level.

    Release date: 2006-02-14

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 82-621-X2006002
    Description:

    This issue examines smoking trends from 2000/01 to 2005 for the population aged 12 or older, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. This issue also presents diabetes prevalence by age, sex and province or territory for the population aged 12 and over, using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2006-06-13

  • Technical products: 82-621-X20060029226
    Description:

    This article examines smoking trends from 2000/01 to 2005 for the population aged 12 or older, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Smoking prevalence is compared by age, sex and province. Proportions of the population living in households where smoking is totally banned are presented, as well as percentages of the employed population who face smoking bans at work. Exposure rates to second-hand smoke among non-smokers are examined. The article also presents estimates of these characteristics at the health region level.

    Release date: 2006-06-13

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: