Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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All (28)

All (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114194
    Description:

    This article examines changes in the wealth of Canadian families over the period 1999 to 2012, with a particular focus on changes across income quintiles. The paper also examines changes in the concentration of wealth across income quintiles, as well as the characteristics of families with low income and no wealth.

    Release date: 2015-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114167
    Description:

    This paper examines changes in debt, assets and net worth among Canadian families with debt over the period 1999 to 2012, by selected family characteristics. It also examines the extent to which two key ratios of indebtedness, the debt-to-income ratio and the debt-to-asset ratio, varied over the period.

    Release date: 2015-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200311690
    Description:

    Canadians accumulate wealth to deal with unforeseen circumstances, fund their children's education, invest in business opportunities and fund their retirement, among other reasons. Wealth is therefore a key indicator of household financial well-being. However, the financial and housing markets in which households invest have changed substantially. This study develops a synthetic cohort approach to examine the effect of these changes on the wealth accumulation of successive generations of Canadians' with a particular focus on younger households.

    Release date: 2012-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211417
    Description:

    Previous studies of older Canadians well-being have focused on changes in income as individuals age and leave the workforce. However, little has been published on the extent to which consumption levels change in this transitional period. This study uses data from the Survey of Family Expenditures and the Survey of Household Spending to develop a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by those born in the late 1930s changed from middle age (in the early 1980s) to retirement (in the late 2000s).

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910613231
    Description:

    Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513209
    Description:

    The general view is that teenage childbearing will have long-term negative effects on the well-being of the mother-- she may have more difficulty completing high school, which means she may be less likely to pursue postsecondary education and acquire skills for better jobs. Since low-skilled jobs tend to pay less, teenage mothers would have a higher likelihood of living in low income. This study looks at women aged 30 to 39 to determine whether teenage childbearing is related to lower long-term socioeconomic characteristics, with the focus on educational attainment, labour force participation, and living in low income.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060029223
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913149
    Description:

    While spending on prescription drugs still constitutes less than 1% of the overall household budget, the average expenditure rose 71% between 1992 and 2002. Lack of universal coverage for prescription drugs could adversely affect seniors on fixed incomes and people with specific medical conditions. Spending is most affected by province of residence.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410713123
    Description:

    This study looks at the decision of parents to save, and amounts saved, for the future education of children aged under 19 years in 2002. A model is used to estimate cumulative parental savings, taking into consideration characteristics of the family and the child, aspirations and involvement of parents, awareness of saving incentive programs, and expectations about grant programs.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410513120
    Description:

    This paper compares the economic well-being of recent widows in four OECD countries (Canada, the United States, Great Britain and Germany) during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310113083
    Description:

    This article takes a brief look at family incomes in 2000 and changes that have occurred since 1980.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046497
    Description:

    This article examines the percentage of Canadians in owner-occupied homes, the condition and size of their housing, and the proportion of income spent on housing.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021068442
    Description:

    This article examines how Canadians were housed in 2000. What percentage lived in owner-occupied homes? Were their homes in good condition? Was the size suitable for their needs? And, what proportion of their income was spent on housing?

    Release date: 2002-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010115981
    Description:

    A brief look at family incomes in 1999 and changes since 1990.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010015610
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of changes between 1980 and 1997 in various taxes in the G-7 and OECD countries.

    Release date: 2001-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713254
    Description:

    The loss of manufacturing jobs can affect other sectors of the economy, particularly when local employment is heavily concentrated in manufacturing. This article covers income, low-income incidence and Employment Insurance use, in regions with varying concentrations of manufacturing employment. The article focuses on the period from 2000 the most recent peak in manufacturing employment to 2007 the last full year of economic growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035372
    Description:

    Some taxes may be higher, some lower than in other developed nations, but overall Canada's effective tax rate is middle-of-the-road. Using OECD data, this study compares several tax-t0-GDP ratios of the G-7 and the 29 OECD countires.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035373
    Description:

    Payroll taxes vary widely in level and growth across the provinces. Of the nine taxes, only three are nationwide. This article looks at trends across the country. It also briefly compares total Canadian payroll taxes with those of other G-7 and OECD nations.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000025070
    Description:

    Payroll taxes have grown substantially since the early 1980s, and have become an increasingly important source of government revenues. This article, part one of a two-part analysis, details the various payroll taxes collected by the federal and provincial governments. A subsequent article will report on national and provincial trends in the level, growth and role of each component and compare Canadian payroll taxes to those of the other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014024
    Description:

    In this chapter, we assess the family's role in determining the acquisition of higher education and literacy. More specifically, our objective is to relate individual educational attainment, literacy abilities, and labour market characteristics to parental educational and labour market attributes. We compare different age cohorts and thereby examine relationships between parents and children over more than one generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014020
    Description:

    Our objectives in this chapter are to determine the degree of intergenerational income mobility in Canada during the mid-1980s and 1990s and to investigate whether it has changed over time. In an era of increasing income inequality within a generation, it is important to understand whether equality of opportunity is preserved, or whether increasing polarization in labour market outcomes will be further exacerbated in the next generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980023999
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth - not only for many individual industries, but also for the overall economy. In 1996, personal expenditures amounted to 58.3% of Canada's nominal gross domestic product (GDP), up from 56.6% in 1986. Aggregate consumer spending patterns are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. As well, changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can affect consumer decisions, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of different goods and services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114194
    Description:

    This article examines changes in the wealth of Canadian families over the period 1999 to 2012, with a particular focus on changes across income quintiles. The paper also examines changes in the concentration of wealth across income quintiles, as well as the characteristics of families with low income and no wealth.

    Release date: 2015-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114167
    Description:

    This paper examines changes in debt, assets and net worth among Canadian families with debt over the period 1999 to 2012, by selected family characteristics. It also examines the extent to which two key ratios of indebtedness, the debt-to-income ratio and the debt-to-asset ratio, varied over the period.

    Release date: 2015-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200311690
    Description:

    Canadians accumulate wealth to deal with unforeseen circumstances, fund their children's education, invest in business opportunities and fund their retirement, among other reasons. Wealth is therefore a key indicator of household financial well-being. However, the financial and housing markets in which households invest have changed substantially. This study develops a synthetic cohort approach to examine the effect of these changes on the wealth accumulation of successive generations of Canadians' with a particular focus on younger households.

    Release date: 2012-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211417
    Description:

    Previous studies of older Canadians well-being have focused on changes in income as individuals age and leave the workforce. However, little has been published on the extent to which consumption levels change in this transitional period. This study uses data from the Survey of Family Expenditures and the Survey of Household Spending to develop a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by those born in the late 1930s changed from middle age (in the early 1980s) to retirement (in the late 2000s).

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910613231
    Description:

    Like the United States and the United Kingdom, Canada has a higher proportion of low-paid jobs than Australia and most countries in continental Europe. While the differences with continental Europe highlight different approaches to the labour market, the much lower rate of low-paid work in Australia is more puzzling since that country shares many similarities with Canada. Differences in wage-setting mechanisms appear to play a role in explaining the disparity in rates of low-paid jobs.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513209
    Description:

    The general view is that teenage childbearing will have long-term negative effects on the well-being of the mother-- she may have more difficulty completing high school, which means she may be less likely to pursue postsecondary education and acquire skills for better jobs. Since low-skilled jobs tend to pay less, teenage mothers would have a higher likelihood of living in low income. This study looks at women aged 30 to 39 to determine whether teenage childbearing is related to lower long-term socioeconomic characteristics, with the focus on educational attainment, labour force participation, and living in low income.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060029223
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510913149
    Description:

    While spending on prescription drugs still constitutes less than 1% of the overall household budget, the average expenditure rose 71% between 1992 and 2002. Lack of universal coverage for prescription drugs could adversely affect seniors on fixed incomes and people with specific medical conditions. Spending is most affected by province of residence.

    Release date: 2005-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410713123
    Description:

    This study looks at the decision of parents to save, and amounts saved, for the future education of children aged under 19 years in 2002. A model is used to estimate cumulative parental savings, taking into consideration characteristics of the family and the child, aspirations and involvement of parents, awareness of saving incentive programs, and expectations about grant programs.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410513120
    Description:

    This paper compares the economic well-being of recent widows in four OECD countries (Canada, the United States, Great Britain and Germany) during the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310113083
    Description:

    This article takes a brief look at family incomes in 2000 and changes that have occurred since 1980.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046497
    Description:

    This article examines the percentage of Canadians in owner-occupied homes, the condition and size of their housing, and the proportion of income spent on housing.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20021068442
    Description:

    This article examines how Canadians were housed in 2000. What percentage lived in owner-occupied homes? Were their homes in good condition? Was the size suitable for their needs? And, what proportion of their income was spent on housing?

    Release date: 2002-06-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010115981
    Description:

    A brief look at family incomes in 1999 and changes since 1990.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010015610
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of changes between 1980 and 1997 in various taxes in the G-7 and OECD countries.

    Release date: 2001-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713254
    Description:

    The loss of manufacturing jobs can affect other sectors of the economy, particularly when local employment is heavily concentrated in manufacturing. This article covers income, low-income incidence and Employment Insurance use, in regions with varying concentrations of manufacturing employment. The article focuses on the period from 2000 the most recent peak in manufacturing employment to 2007 the last full year of economic growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035372
    Description:

    Some taxes may be higher, some lower than in other developed nations, but overall Canada's effective tax rate is middle-of-the-road. Using OECD data, this study compares several tax-t0-GDP ratios of the G-7 and the 29 OECD countires.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035373
    Description:

    Payroll taxes vary widely in level and growth across the provinces. Of the nine taxes, only three are nationwide. This article looks at trends across the country. It also briefly compares total Canadian payroll taxes with those of other G-7 and OECD nations.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000025070
    Description:

    Payroll taxes have grown substantially since the early 1980s, and have become an increasingly important source of government revenues. This article, part one of a two-part analysis, details the various payroll taxes collected by the federal and provincial governments. A subsequent article will report on national and provincial trends in the level, growth and role of each component and compare Canadian payroll taxes to those of the other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014024
    Description:

    In this chapter, we assess the family's role in determining the acquisition of higher education and literacy. More specifically, our objective is to relate individual educational attainment, literacy abilities, and labour market characteristics to parental educational and labour market attributes. We compare different age cohorts and thereby examine relationships between parents and children over more than one generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014020
    Description:

    Our objectives in this chapter are to determine the degree of intergenerational income mobility in Canada during the mid-1980s and 1990s and to investigate whether it has changed over time. In an era of increasing income inequality within a generation, it is important to understand whether equality of opportunity is preserved, or whether increasing polarization in labour market outcomes will be further exacerbated in the next generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980023999
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth - not only for many individual industries, but also for the overall economy. In 1996, personal expenditures amounted to 58.3% of Canada's nominal gross domestic product (GDP), up from 56.6% in 1986. Aggregate consumer spending patterns are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. As well, changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can affect consumer decisions, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of different goods and services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

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