Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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All (6)

All (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413208
    Description:

    Throughout much of the last century, older couples faced only one retirement decision -- the husband's. However, the dramatic rise and sustained participation of women in the paid labour force since the 1970s transformed the retirement transitions of married couples; increasingly, couples had to make two decisions and balance the preferences and constraints of partners who both made substantial contributions to household income. This article looks at the extent to which spouses synchronize the timing of their retirements, the factors associated with taking one or another pathway into retirement and changes in patterns of retirement through the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711113197
    Description:

    Prime-aged couples experienced a moderate decline in RPP coverage over the last two decades, as the substantial growth in wives labour market participation and the slight increase in their RPP coverage only partially offset a substantial decline in husbands coverage. On average, retirement savings of families rose over the last two decades, but the distribution became more unequal. To a large extent, the uneven growth in retirement savings mirrors the sharp increase in family earnings inequality since the early 1980s.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611013172
    Description:

    Using tax data, this paper examines earnings instability among lone parents, unattached individuals, and two-parent families over the past two decades. When income tax effects and main sources of income were considered, no strong evidence of a widespread increase in instability was found. Government transfers play a particularly important role in reducing the earnings instability of lone mothers and unattached individuals

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013571
    Description:

    "Intergenerational equity" is a term that can be interpreted in the sense of either: [1] equity between persons in the intergenerational transmission of economic status - often judged by the norm of "equality of opportunity"; or [2] equity in the intergenerational division of aggregate resources, considering all members of each generation as a group. Many of the papers in the companion volume (Corak, 1998) of intergenerational social mobility has long been a central issue in sociology and politics. This volume has focussed on the second interpretation, and espoused a "new" type of measurement of "Generational Accounting."

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013563
    Description:

    Generational Accounting (GA) is a method of long-term public policy evaluation that attempts to measure what representative members of each current and future generation can expect to pay over their remaining lifetimes in net taxes. In this chapter we highlight the issues that arise from using GA to assess Canada's fiscal policy in terms of sustainability and overall impact on different age groups.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199100142
    Description:

    After paying all the monthly bills, some people actually have money left over. This article reviews some of the problems in identifying discretionary income and then provides a profile of families with "extra cash".

    Release date: 1991-03-05

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013571
    Description:

    "Intergenerational equity" is a term that can be interpreted in the sense of either: [1] equity between persons in the intergenerational transmission of economic status - often judged by the norm of "equality of opportunity"; or [2] equity in the intergenerational division of aggregate resources, considering all members of each generation as a group. Many of the papers in the companion volume (Corak, 1998) of intergenerational social mobility has long been a central issue in sociology and politics. This volume has focussed on the second interpretation, and espoused a "new" type of measurement of "Generational Accounting."

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013563
    Description:

    Generational Accounting (GA) is a method of long-term public policy evaluation that attempts to measure what representative members of each current and future generation can expect to pay over their remaining lifetimes in net taxes. In this chapter we highlight the issues that arise from using GA to assess Canada's fiscal policy in terms of sustainability and overall impact on different age groups.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413208
    Description:

    Throughout much of the last century, older couples faced only one retirement decision -- the husband's. However, the dramatic rise and sustained participation of women in the paid labour force since the 1970s transformed the retirement transitions of married couples; increasingly, couples had to make two decisions and balance the preferences and constraints of partners who both made substantial contributions to household income. This article looks at the extent to which spouses synchronize the timing of their retirements, the factors associated with taking one or another pathway into retirement and changes in patterns of retirement through the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200711113197
    Description:

    Prime-aged couples experienced a moderate decline in RPP coverage over the last two decades, as the substantial growth in wives labour market participation and the slight increase in their RPP coverage only partially offset a substantial decline in husbands coverage. On average, retirement savings of families rose over the last two decades, but the distribution became more unequal. To a large extent, the uneven growth in retirement savings mirrors the sharp increase in family earnings inequality since the early 1980s.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200611013172
    Description:

    Using tax data, this paper examines earnings instability among lone parents, unattached individuals, and two-parent families over the past two decades. When income tax effects and main sources of income were considered, no strong evidence of a widespread increase in instability was found. Government transfers play a particularly important role in reducing the earnings instability of lone mothers and unattached individuals

    Release date: 2006-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199100142
    Description:

    After paying all the monthly bills, some people actually have money left over. This article reviews some of the problems in identifying discretionary income and then provides a profile of families with "extra cash".

    Release date: 1991-03-05

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