Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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All (15)

All (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311529
    Description:

    This study examines the financial situation of individuals living in low-income families with at least one employed family member compared to low-income families with no employed family members and employed non-low-income families. It presents new findings from the Canadian Financial Capability Survey on the level of net worth, assets and debts, financial security and retirement preparation of these groups.

    Release date: 2011-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713232
    Description:

    The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) was established to provide low-income seniors with extra income. While simplification of the GIS application process and outreach efforts have increased take-up rates, some seniors are still missing out. This update explores the characteristics of eligible non-recipients.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710913194
    Description:

    No agreed-upon definition exists of what constitutes high income, either in dollar cut-offs or as a percentage of the population. Researchers have used widely varying methods, producing widely varying outcomes. This paper presents various criteria for defining high income and looks at some of the characteristics and behaviours of high-income taxfilers under these definitions. Income taxes paid and effective tax rates are also examined.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040117614
    Description:

    This paper compares which provinces have seen the largest changes in social assistance among their population, and which had the highest and lowest rates of welfare use in 2003.

    Release date: 2004-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030046509
    Description:

    This article studies recent divergence between Canadian and U.S. household, government, business and external spending and saving. It also looks at the implications for lending and borrowing in the two countries.

    Release date: 2003-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036006
    Description:

    This article looks at whether there are regional differences in giving and volunteering.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025823
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes in the ways that Canadians give.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044756
    Description:

    Earnings of physicians continue to exceed the overall average. This article presents a demographic and earnings profile of the medical profession and highlights changes between 1980 and 1995.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X19990014716
    Description:

    Two design-based estimators of gross flows and transition rates are considered. One makes use of the cross-sectional samples for the estimation of the income class boundaries at each time period and the longitudinal sample for the estimation of counts of units in the longitudinal population (longitudinal counts); this is the mixed estimator. The other one is entirely based on the longitudinal sample, both for the estimation of the class boundaries and the longitudinal counts; this is the longitudinal estimator. We compare the two estimators in the presence of large attrition rates, by means of a simulation. We find that under a less than perfect model of compensation for attrition, the mixed estimator is usually more sensitive to model bias than the longitudinal estimator. Furthermore, we find that for the mixed estimator, the magnitude of this bias overshadows the small gain in precision when compared to the longitudinal estimator. The results are illustrated with data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the Longitudinal Administrative Database of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014407
    Description:

    The distribution of income changes over time, as does the proportion of total income received by different family types. This aritcle examines the relative shares of total family income for different family groups between 1970 and 1995, along with changes in the composition of these groups. It complements the family income study published in the Winter 1998 issue of perspectives.

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044039
    Description:

    Income inequality among families increased between 1970 and 1995 as a result of the recessions of the early eighties and nineties. This article looks at the extend of, and changes in, family income inequality over the period. It also demonstrates the role of government transfer payments and personal income taxes in reducing inequality.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041575
    Description:

    An analysis of families in the top percentile of the income distribution, focusing on their sources of income.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199100256
    Description:

    Over the last 20 years, the increasing participation of women in the labour force has been one of the most significant changes in Canada. With that in mind, the author draws on data from previous censuses to review changes in women's earnings and work patterns, and the consequent impact on family income.

    Release date: 1991-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199000355
    Description:

    From family allowance cheques and child tax credits to old age security pensions and guaranteed income supplements, most Canadians benefit from government transfer payments. Using Census data from 1971 to 1986, this article reviews changes in government transfer payments.

    Release date: 1990-08-24

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311529
    Description:

    This study examines the financial situation of individuals living in low-income families with at least one employed family member compared to low-income families with no employed family members and employed non-low-income families. It presents new findings from the Canadian Financial Capability Survey on the level of net worth, assets and debts, financial security and retirement preparation of these groups.

    Release date: 2011-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910713232
    Description:

    The Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) was established to provide low-income seniors with extra income. While simplification of the GIS application process and outreach efforts have increased take-up rates, some seniors are still missing out. This update explores the characteristics of eligible non-recipients.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710913194
    Description:

    No agreed-upon definition exists of what constitutes high income, either in dollar cut-offs or as a percentage of the population. Researchers have used widely varying methods, producing widely varying outcomes. This paper presents various criteria for defining high income and looks at some of the characteristics and behaviours of high-income taxfilers under these definitions. Income taxes paid and effective tax rates are also examined.

    Release date: 2007-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040117614
    Description:

    This paper compares which provinces have seen the largest changes in social assistance among their population, and which had the highest and lowest rates of welfare use in 2003.

    Release date: 2004-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030046509
    Description:

    This article studies recent divergence between Canadian and U.S. household, government, business and external spending and saving. It also looks at the implications for lending and borrowing in the two countries.

    Release date: 2003-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036006
    Description:

    This article looks at whether there are regional differences in giving and volunteering.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025823
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes in the ways that Canadians give.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044756
    Description:

    Earnings of physicians continue to exceed the overall average. This article presents a demographic and earnings profile of the medical profession and highlights changes between 1980 and 1995.

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X19990014716
    Description:

    Two design-based estimators of gross flows and transition rates are considered. One makes use of the cross-sectional samples for the estimation of the income class boundaries at each time period and the longitudinal sample for the estimation of counts of units in the longitudinal population (longitudinal counts); this is the mixed estimator. The other one is entirely based on the longitudinal sample, both for the estimation of the class boundaries and the longitudinal counts; this is the longitudinal estimator. We compare the two estimators in the presence of large attrition rates, by means of a simulation. We find that under a less than perfect model of compensation for attrition, the mixed estimator is usually more sensitive to model bias than the longitudinal estimator. Furthermore, we find that for the mixed estimator, the magnitude of this bias overshadows the small gain in precision when compared to the longitudinal estimator. The results are illustrated with data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the Longitudinal Administrative Database of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014407
    Description:

    The distribution of income changes over time, as does the proportion of total income received by different family types. This aritcle examines the relative shares of total family income for different family groups between 1970 and 1995, along with changes in the composition of these groups. It complements the family income study published in the Winter 1998 issue of perspectives.

    Release date: 1999-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044039
    Description:

    Income inequality among families increased between 1970 and 1995 as a result of the recessions of the early eighties and nineties. This article looks at the extend of, and changes in, family income inequality over the period. It also demonstrates the role of government transfer payments and personal income taxes in reducing inequality.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041575
    Description:

    An analysis of families in the top percentile of the income distribution, focusing on their sources of income.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199100256
    Description:

    Over the last 20 years, the increasing participation of women in the labour force has been one of the most significant changes in Canada. With that in mind, the author draws on data from previous censuses to review changes in women's earnings and work patterns, and the consequent impact on family income.

    Release date: 1991-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199000355
    Description:

    From family allowance cheques and child tax credits to old age security pensions and guaranteed income supplements, most Canadians benefit from government transfer payments. Using Census data from 1971 to 1986, this article reviews changes in government transfer payments.

    Release date: 1990-08-24

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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