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  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998007
    Description:

    This study examines the upward mobility of low-paid Canadians between 1993 and 1995 using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-31

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998002
    Description:

    This document presents the questions, responses and interview flow for the Contact and Demographic portions of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) interviews.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998003
    Description:

    This paper provides a written approximation of the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) labour interview questionnaire.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998012
    Description:

    This paper looks at the work of the task force responsible for reviewing Statistics Canada's household and family income statistics programs, and at one of associated program changes, namely, the integration of two major sources of annual income data in Canada, the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) and the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998015
    Description:

    This paper reviews some of the substantive findings that have emerged from recent studies which used longitudinal data sources. It then discusses the 'growing pains' that can occur as these complex sources find their niche, and explores some of the lessons learned in the Canadian context.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998017
    Description:

    The wage opportunities afforded different racial groups vary considerably. This paper presents a new analysis of wage differentials for different visible minority groups in Canada which also accounts for immigration background. It uses data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998018
    Description:

    This paper presents data on labour market transitions (or the seam) using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998004
    Description:

    This paper presents the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 1998 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary questionnaire.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998005
    Description:

    This article gives an overview of the main goals of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the methodology used.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998006
    Description:

    This paper describes the collection method and content of the 1999 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income interview.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998008
    Description:

    This paper examines how workers react to being laid off. It looks at which laid off workers maintain their participation in the labor market, and how long it takes to find a new job.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998010
    Description:

    This paper examines the role of economic circumstances in the dissolution of marriage or common-law unions. It uses 1993 and 1994 data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998009
    Description:

    This study looks at men and women who experienced an increase in their employment earnings following the last recession and aims to identify the factors and characteristics that created that increase.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1998011
    Description:

    This paper explores the common meanings, adjustment strategies and interpretations of involuntary job loss and try to determine what resources, at the institutional, community and familial levels, allow individuals to maintain a sense of personal worth, hopefulness and attachment during joblessness.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980034002
    Description:

    This article examines the extent of indebtedness, the repayment record and the impact of high debt on postsecondary graduates who used government loans to help finance their studies.

    Release date: 1998-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044037
    Description:

    Since the introduction of casinos and video lottery terminals in the 1990s, growth in gambling has outstripped that of most other industries. This article updates an earlier examination of employment and government revenue for this industry, as well as average household spending on games of chance.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044039
    Description:

    Income inequality among families increased between 1970 and 1995 as a result of the recessions of the early eighties and nineties. This article looks at the extend of, and changes in, family income inequality over the period. It also demonstrates the role of government transfer payments and personal income taxes in reducing inequality.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044041
    Description:

    This article examines the situation of people who retired in the first half of the 1990s to see how well their retirement income has replaced their former income.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014017
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since they early 1970s. Second, the autors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on their children. However, this has not been challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government Finances and Generational Equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014018
    Description:

    In this chapter we document trends in social transfers, market incomes and family composition from 1973 through 1995, and their impact on the incidence of low-income among four generations: children (new-borns to those 14 years of age), young adults (25 to 34), the older working-age population (45 to 54), and the elderly (over 65).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014024
    Description:

    In this chapter, we assess the family's role in determining the acquisition of higher education and literacy. More specifically, our objective is to relate individual educational attainment, literacy abilities, and labour market characteristics to parental educational and labour market attributes. We compare different age cohorts and thereby examine relationships between parents and children over more than one generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014020
    Description:

    Our objectives in this chapter are to determine the degree of intergenerational income mobility in Canada during the mid-1980s and 1990s and to investigate whether it has changed over time. In an era of increasing income inequality within a generation, it is important to understand whether equality of opportunity is preserved, or whether increasing polarization in labour market outcomes will be further exacerbated in the next generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Table: 95F0268X
    Description:

    The Area Profile Series provides a univariate statistical overview of a region presenting most of the census variables. This electronic profile contains all levels of geography, i.e. Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts, federal electoral districts*, enumeration areas and forward sortation areas.These data are based on a 20% sample except for the variables Age, Sex and Marital Status which are obtained on a 100% basis.Area Profiles are available on diskette by a variety of geographical areas and there is a print publication for census divisions and subdivisions, as well as for census tracts. For a brief look at the type of information available on the Area Profiles, the Community Profiles at the census subdivision level can be accessed on the Statistics Canada web site at www.statcan.gc.ca under the heading Census - "Statistical Profile of Canadian Communities". A statistical profile is presented for all Canadian communities (cities, towns, villages, Indian reserves and settlements, etc.) highlighting information on education, income and work, families and dwellings, as well as general population information. Confidentiality procedures have been applied to the data (both suppression of data and random rounding of numbers) to protect the confidentiality of individual respondents.*As per the 1987 Representation Order or the 1996 Representation Order.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998113
    Description:

    Our objective is to obtain an accurate estimate of the degree of intergenerational income mobility in Canada. We use income tax information on about 400,000 father-son pairs, and find intergenerational earnings elasticities to be about 0.2. Earnings mobility tends to be slightly greater than income mobility, but non-parametric techniques uncover significant non-linearities in both of these relationships. Intergenerational earnings mobility is greater at the lower end of the income distribution than at the upper end, and displays an inverted V-shape elsewhere. Intergenerational income mobility follows roughly the same pattern, but is much lower at the very top of the income distribution.

    Release date: 1998-10-27

Data (17)

Data (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Table: 95F0268X
    Description:

    The Area Profile Series provides a univariate statistical overview of a region presenting most of the census variables. This electronic profile contains all levels of geography, i.e. Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts, federal electoral districts*, enumeration areas and forward sortation areas.These data are based on a 20% sample except for the variables Age, Sex and Marital Status which are obtained on a 100% basis.Area Profiles are available on diskette by a variety of geographical areas and there is a print publication for census divisions and subdivisions, as well as for census tracts. For a brief look at the type of information available on the Area Profiles, the Community Profiles at the census subdivision level can be accessed on the Statistics Canada web site at www.statcan.gc.ca under the heading Census - "Statistical Profile of Canadian Communities". A statistical profile is presented for all Canadian communities (cities, towns, villages, Indian reserves and settlements, etc.) highlighting information on education, income and work, families and dwellings, as well as general population information. Confidentiality procedures have been applied to the data (both suppression of data and random rounding of numbers) to protect the confidentiality of individual respondents.*As per the 1987 Representation Order or the 1996 Representation Order.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Table: 93F0020X
    Description:

    This CD-ROM contains the cumulative set of 143 data tables from all Nation Series CDROMs .This comprehensive CD-ROM provides a full range of statistics on characteristics of the population which includes: Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Unions; Families, Households and Dwellings, Immigration and Citizenship, Mother Tongue, Home Language, Official and non-official Languages; Aboriginal data, Ethnic Origin, Visible Minorities (Population group), Labour Market Activity, Industry and Occupation, Unpaid Household Activities (unpaid work), Place of Work, Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; Individual and Family Income and Family, Dwellings and Household Information.These data are national in coverage and provide information for Canada, provinces and territories and, in some tabulations, census metropolitan area levels. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses to provide an historical perspective.A variety of Nation Series data table extracts presenting social and economic characteristics of the Canadian population are available on the Statistics Canada Census Web site (www.statcan.gc.ca).

    Release date: 1998-09-18

  • Table: 95F0269X
    Description:

    These are a series of approximately 65 tabulations of 1996 Census data, which features two or three inter-related variables that deal with specific characteristics of people, families or households, or with a characteristic of Canadian dwellings. All variables covered by the 1996 Census are represented in the BST program. Forward Sortation Level geography is available for the first time.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0270X
    Description:

    These are a series of approximately 65 tabulations of 1996 Census data, which features two or three inter-related variables that deal with specific characteristics of people, families or households, or with a characteristic of Canadian dwellings. All variables covered by the 1996 Census are represented in the BST program. Forward Sortation Level geography is available for the first time.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0271X
    Description:

    These are a series of approximately 65 tabulations of 1996 Census data, which features two or three inter-related variables that deal with specific characteristics of people, families or households, or with a characteristic of Canadian dwellings. All variables covered by the 1996 Census are represented in the BST program. Forward Sortation Level geography is available for the first time.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0272X
    Description:

    These are a series of approximately 65 tabulations of 1996 Census data, which features two or three inter-related variables that deal with specific characteristics of people, families or households, or with a characteristic of Canadian dwellings. All variables covered by the 1996 Census are represented in the BST program. Forward Sortation Level geography is available for the first time.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Table: 95F0180X
    Description:

    The Area Profile Series provides a univariate statistical overview of a region presenting most of the census variables. This electronic profile contains all levels of geography, i.e. Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census subdivisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts, federal electoral districts*, enumeration areas and forward sortation areas.These data are based on a 20% sample except for the variables Age, Sex and Marital Status which are obtained on a 100% basis.Area Profiles are available on diskette by a variety of geographical areas and there is a print publication for census divisions and subdivisions, as well as for census tracts. For a brief look at the type of information available on the Area Profiles, the Community Profiles at the census subdivision level can be accessed on the Statistics Canada web site at www.statcan.gc.ca under the heading Census - "Statistical Profile of Canadian Communities". A statistical profile is presented for all Canadian communities (cities, towns, villages, Indian reserves and settlements, etc.) highlighting information on education, income and work, families and dwellings, as well as general population information. Confidentiality procedures have been applied to the data (both suppression of data and random rounding of numbers) to protect the confidentiality of individual respondents.*As per the 1987 Representation Order or the 1996 Representation Order.

    Release date: 1998-07-09

  • Table: 93F0030X
    Description:

    The Nation is the first series to release basic data from the 1996 Census, providing national coverage. This series covers characteristics of the population, including demographic, social, cultural, labour force and income variables as well as details on dwellings, households and families. Generally the data are represented for Canada, Provinces, Territories and Census Metropolitan Areas. Some tables include comparisons with data from earlier censuses.

    Release date: 1998-06-09

  • Public use microdata: 62M0001X
    Description:

    This survey provides expenditures by households, as well as their budgets for the year, including all expenditures, income, and changes in assets and debts. Topics include: composition of households, characteristics of dwelling, shelter expenses, furnishings and equipment, running the home, food and alcohol, clothing, medical and health care, travel and transportation, recreation and education, tobacco and miscellaneous expenses.

    Release date: 1998-05-14

  • Table: 62F0021X
    Description:

    These supplementary tables from the 1996 Family expenditure in Canada publication (catalogue no. 62-555-XPB) provide detailed information on expenditures by household for provinces and regions. Expenditure items include: food purchased from stores and restaurants (for detailed food expenditures see: Family food expenditures in Canada, 1996 catalogue no. 62-554-XPB); shelter costs; household operations including communications; household furnishings and equipment; clothing; transportation; health care; personal care; recreation; reading materials; education; tobacco products and alcoholic beverages and miscellaneous expenses. To complete the picture of an annual household budget, expenditures on items such as personal taxes, security (life and employment insurance and employer operated retirement funds), and gifts and contributions are included. Information about household income is presented by income quintile and income group.

    Release date: 1998-02-12

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013567
    Description:

    Generational Accounting (GA) attempts to measure the degree of intergenerational redistribution that exists within a given fiscal and demographic structure. This approach produces a more comprehensive measure of the extent of intergenerational redistribution stemming from government programs than traditional measures that are based solely on government debt and deficits.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013569
    Description:

    The intergenerational fairness and long-term sustainability of Canada's social programs, such as pensions and health care, have recently re-emerged as an issue. The last time this issue had any prominence was more than a decade ago, as part of Canada's "great pension debate" of the late 1970s and early 1980s. As before, the issue is being driven by concerns over population aging.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013568
    Description:

    Many governments have adopted policies aimed at reducing public debt. Although the long-run fiscal dividends of such policies largely depend on the size of the debt-to-GDP cut, the short and medium run effects are more dependent on the type and speed of measures taken.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013564
    Description:

    Canada's workers' compensation systems are financed through a payroll tax with the cost initially falling on employers. The rates that employers pay are supposed to reflect the costs of current and future medical and vocational rehabilitation, and financial compensation associated with workplace injuries, as well as the costs of administering the system.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013571
    Description:

    "Intergenerational equity" is a term that can be interpreted in the sense of either: [1] equity between persons in the intergenerational transmission of economic status - often judged by the norm of "equality of opportunity"; or [2] equity in the intergenerational division of aggregate resources, considering all members of each generation as a group. Many of the papers in the companion volume (Corak, 1998) of intergenerational social mobility has long been a central issue in sociology and politics. This volume has focussed on the second interpretation, and espoused a "new" type of measurement of "Generational Accounting."

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013563
    Description:

    Generational Accounting (GA) is a method of long-term public policy evaluation that attempts to measure what representative members of each current and future generation can expect to pay over their remaining lifetimes in net taxes. In this chapter we highlight the issues that arise from using GA to assess Canada's fiscal policy in terms of sustainability and overall impact on different age groups.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013565
    Description:

    A clear understanding of the size and extent of intergenerational transfers made by governments is central to any informed debate dealing with "Intergenerational Equity." Accordingly, the aim of this chapter is to provide a descriptive backdrop to these discussions by examining how current policy at all levels of government in Canada redistributes income among the different generations.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980034002
    Description:

    This article examines the extent of indebtedness, the repayment record and the impact of high debt on postsecondary graduates who used government loans to help finance their studies.

    Release date: 1998-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044037
    Description:

    Since the introduction of casinos and video lottery terminals in the 1990s, growth in gambling has outstripped that of most other industries. This article updates an earlier examination of employment and government revenue for this industry, as well as average household spending on games of chance.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044039
    Description:

    Income inequality among families increased between 1970 and 1995 as a result of the recessions of the early eighties and nineties. This article looks at the extend of, and changes in, family income inequality over the period. It also demonstrates the role of government transfer payments and personal income taxes in reducing inequality.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044041
    Description:

    This article examines the situation of people who retired in the first half of the 1990s to see how well their retirement income has replaced their former income.

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014017
    Description:

    The contributors to this book examine two broad themes related to the well-being of Canadian youth. First, they document the nature of the labour market facing young adults and how it has changed since they early 1970s. Second, the autors examine how families, communities, and the public sector influence some of the ways in which children become successful and self-reliant adults. The motivation for bringing these essays together has to do with the increasing importance of child well-being in public discourse and the development of public policy. The major message to emerge is that the future of Canada's children is both a good news, and a bad news story. Labour markets have changed dramatically, and on average it is now more difficult to obtain a strong foothold that will lead to increasing prosperity. Many young Canadians, however, are well prepared by their family and community backgrounds to deal with these new challenges, and as young parents are in a position to pass this heritage on their children. However, this has not been challenges in getting ahead in life. A companion volume published in February of 1998 by Statistics Canada called Government Finances and Generational Equity examines the operation of government taxes and transfers from a generational perspective, focusing on the conduct of fiscal policy and the relative status of individuals in successive generations.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014018
    Description:

    In this chapter we document trends in social transfers, market incomes and family composition from 1973 through 1995, and their impact on the incidence of low-income among four generations: children (new-borns to those 14 years of age), young adults (25 to 34), the older working-age population (45 to 54), and the elderly (over 65).

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014024
    Description:

    In this chapter, we assess the family's role in determining the acquisition of higher education and literacy. More specifically, our objective is to relate individual educational attainment, literacy abilities, and labour market characteristics to parental educational and labour market attributes. We compare different age cohorts and thereby examine relationships between parents and children over more than one generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014020
    Description:

    Our objectives in this chapter are to determine the degree of intergenerational income mobility in Canada during the mid-1980s and 1990s and to investigate whether it has changed over time. In an era of increasing income inequality within a generation, it is important to understand whether equality of opportunity is preserved, or whether increasing polarization in labour market outcomes will be further exacerbated in the next generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998113
    Description:

    Our objective is to obtain an accurate estimate of the degree of intergenerational income mobility in Canada. We use income tax information on about 400,000 father-son pairs, and find intergenerational earnings elasticities to be about 0.2. Earnings mobility tends to be slightly greater than income mobility, but non-parametric techniques uncover significant non-linearities in both of these relationships. Intergenerational earnings mobility is greater at the lower end of the income distribution than at the upper end, and displays an inverted V-shape elsewhere. Intergenerational income mobility follows roughly the same pattern, but is much lower at the very top of the income distribution.

    Release date: 1998-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980023999
    Description:

    Consumer expenditures by households are increasingly a driving force behind economic growth - not only for many individual industries, but also for the overall economy. In 1996, personal expenditures amounted to 58.3% of Canada's nominal gross domestic product (GDP), up from 56.6% in 1986. Aggregate consumer spending patterns are affected by several factors. Consumer tastes can shift over time, as new commodities are introduced and others become outdated. As well, changes in the demographic, economic and social characteristics of consumers can affect consumer decisions, as can shifts in the relative prices, utilities and quality levels of different goods and services.

    Release date: 1998-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998124
    Description:

    Conventional wisdom has it that U. S. society is both richer and more unequal than Canadian society, and that both have become more unequal in recent decades. It is true that earnings inequality increased in both countries from 1974 to 1985. However, in the 1985 to 1995 period, while generally rising in the United States, earnings inequality fell marginally in Canada. At the same time, perhaps surprisingly, polarization-the spreading out of the earning distribution away from the median- fell over the past decade in both nations. Adding in the role of government income taxes and transfers, families' disposable incomes became more equal in Canada, but more unequal in the United States. Finally, a large portion of Canadian families had absolutely higher purchasing power than their U. S. counterparts.

    Release date: 1998-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980023826
    Description:

    This study examines changes in the income of separated persons with no children under 18 at home at the time of the breakup. It also compares their sources of income before and after separation. This complements a previous study profiling couples who had children at home when they separated.

    Release date: 1998-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980023827
    Description:

    This article looks at the RRSP Home Buyers' Plan in terms of the amounts withdrawn and the number of participants by age, sex and income. In addition, it considers the number of taxfilers who defaulted on their 1995 repayments and the amounts involved.

    Release date: 1998-06-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89F0100X
    Description:

    These highlights provide a brief summary of the report " The Value of Words: Literacy and Economic Security in Canada", the latest monograph released using data from the International Adult Literacy Survey. Canada, like many other industrialized countries, is increasingly being forced to face the literacy problem within its own borders. Over the past decade, the issue has become more prominent on the national policy and research agenda. There has been little systematic research in Canada, however, on the relationship between literacy and income security. Using data from the Canadian component of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), this study seeks to fill this research gap. An in-depth exploration of the links between literacy and economic security will build on existing knowledge and will also provide useful insights that will help shape public policy.

    Release date: 1998-05-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013596
    Description:

    This study examines some of the factors underlying the rapid growth in RRSP contributions since 1991, and explains how, and why, the composition of contributions has changed. Regiona ldifferences in RRSP participation are also provided. Finally, RRSP withdrawals are briefly noted.

    Release date: 1998-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980013597
    Description:

    Relatively few eligible taxfilers take advantage of their unused RRSP contribution room in a given year, and they use only a fraction of it. This article looks at how much room has accumulated since 1991. It also examines which taxfilers are using their RRSP room.

    Release date: 1998-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013506
    Description:

    The economic system has adopted many institutions that intermediate between buyers and sellers. In commodity markets there are retailers and supermarkets; in the housing market there are real estate agents; in financial markets, there are depository institutions (commercial banks, savings and loans institutions, credit unions), contractual savings institutions (insurance companies and pension funds) and investment intermediaries (mutual funds, finance companies).

    Release date: 1998-02-02

Reference (15)

Reference (15) (15 of 15 results)

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