Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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All (35) (25 of 35 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010126037
    Description:

    This report focuses on employer pension plan assets, together with other private pension assets such as registered retirement savings plans. It also presents estimates of net worth, including the value of employer pension plan benefits.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-596-X
    Description:

    For the first time in a Canadian asset and debt survey, the 1999 Survey of Financial Security (SFS) includes an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer (i.e.registered) pension plans (RPPs). Although not an asset in the sense that it can be sold and used for another purpose, employer pension plan benefits are nonetheless an important part of the net worth of Canadians, as they provide many with at least a portion of their income in retirement. For many families, it is likely to be one of the largest assets.

    The 1999 SFS provides the most comprehensive picture of the net worth of Canadians yet available. Information was collected on the value of all major financial and non-financial assets, and on the money owing on mortgages, vehicles, credit cards, student loans and other debts. The value of these assets, less the debts, is referred to as net worth. Data collection took place from May to July 1999, in all provinces. Although this is the seventh time that an asset and debt survey has been conducted by Statistics Canada, over 15 years have passed since the last survey was done, in 1984. Many changes have taken place since that time, in both the economy and the structure of families. Survey findings are available in the report The assets and debts of Canadians: an overview of the results of the Survey of Financial Security (catalogue no. 13-595-XIE).

    Release date: 2001-12-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010115981
    Description:

    A brief look at family incomes in 1999 and changes since 1990.

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036006
    Description:

    This article looks at whether there are regional differences in giving and volunteering.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2001007
    Description:

    This publication provides a detailed description of the methods used to arrive at the various low income cut-offs. There is also an explanation of how base years are defined, and how the cutoffs are updated using the Consumer Price Index.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001171
    Description:

    A framework for thinking about intergenerational mobility as it relates to the relationship between parent and child incomes as well as evidence on the degree and sources of intergenerational mobility in Canada is reviewed. The major conclusion is that Canadian society is characterized by a good deal of intergenerational mobility, and the available evidence suggests that being raised in low-income does not pre-ordain children to low-income in adulthood. Canada compares well in this regard to many other countries, being characterized on average by more mobility than the U.S. or U.K. and on a par with some of the most mobile nations. The sources for this pattern have to do with access to high quality education, and high quality non-monetary investments in children. However, there is no clear evidence linking the level of family income to the nature of these investments.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20010045949
    Description:

    In keeping with the upward trend worldwide, international travel to Canada (all durations combined) increased by 5.2% for arrivals from overseas and 1.8% for arrivals from the United States in 1999.

    Release date: 2001-10-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015906
    Description:

    Tourism in Canadian Cities, A Statistical Outlook is a valuable source of information, and in some instances the only source, for Convention and Visitor Bureau's (CVBs) across Canada to profile visitors to their city. This article will examine how Tourism Vancouver - The Greater Vancouver Convention and Visitors Bureau used the information.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 75F0033M2001004
    Description:

    This study looks at the relation between Canadians' donations to charitable organizations and their giving gifts to individuals.

    Release date: 2001-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010065882
    Description:

    This article uses a measure of low income intensity which incorporates the more commonly known low income rate and the average depth of low income to compare urban and rural families in Canada between 1993 and 1997.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010075880
    Description:

    This article looks at several factors which all influence the rate at which people participate in registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs).

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025823
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes in the ways that Canadians give.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2001003
    Description:

    This paper outlines the results of an investigation into three aspects of the low income cut-offs: the behaviour of a proposed 'annually updated' low income series, the addition of payroll taxes, and the restructuring of the matrix of 35 cut-offs.

    Release date: 2001-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001004
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Canadians with low incomes as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025760
    Description:

    In April 2001, Statistics Canada released information from the Survey of electronic commerce and technology, 2000. Among the interesting findings, the data revealed that while sales over the Internet rose sharply in 2000, the proportion of businesses selling on-line fell.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025758
    Description:

    Consumers can browse the Web for purchasing ideas, to place orders and even pay for purchases over the Internet. Canadians have started doing so. Statistics Canada has been monitoring household Internet use for some time. With e-commerce as an emerging phenomenon, the 1999 Household Internet use survey (HIUS) collected detailed information on Internet shopping for the first time.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20010025635
    Description:

    They are becoming the new highways for international tourism traffic to Canada - cruise ships sailing the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are bringing international visitors to Canada in unprecedented numbers.

    Release date: 2001-04-24

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2001045
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the economic well-being of rural Canadians using a variety of income indicators.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2000014
    Description:

    This paper describes the collection method and content of the 2000 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income interview.

    Release date: 2001-03-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2000012
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the new entry exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income interview.

    Release date: 2001-03-27

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 13-595-X
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of the results of the Survey of Financial Security (SFS). This survey collected information on the assets and debts of families and unattached individuals. Data collection took place from May to July 1999, in all provinces. Although this is the seventh time that an asset and debt survey has been conducted by Statistics Canada, over 15 years have passed since the last survey was done, in 1984. Many changes have taken place since that time, in both the economy and the structure of families.

    The 1999 SFS provides the most comprehensive picture of the net wealth of Canadians yet available. Information was collected on the value of all major financial and non-financial assets and on the money owing on mortgages, vehicles, credit cards, student loans and other debts. The value of these assets less the debts is referred to in this report as net worth.

    Release date: 2001-03-15

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

Reference (16)

Reference (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2001007
    Description:

    This publication provides a detailed description of the methods used to arrive at the various low income cut-offs. There is also an explanation of how base years are defined, and how the cutoffs are updated using the Consumer Price Index.

    Release date: 2001-11-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2001003
    Description:

    This paper outlines the results of an investigation into three aspects of the low income cut-offs: the behaviour of a proposed 'annually updated' low income series, the addition of payroll taxes, and the restructuring of the matrix of 35 cut-offs.

    Release date: 2001-07-13

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2001045
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the economic well-being of rural Canadians using a variety of income indicators.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2000014
    Description:

    This paper describes the collection method and content of the 2000 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income interview.

    Release date: 2001-03-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2000012
    Description:

    This document presents the information for the new entry exit portion of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) income interview.

    Release date: 2001-03-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2000016
    Description:

    This paper presents the questions, possible responses and question flows for the 2000 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) preliminary questionnaire.

    Release date: 2001-03-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2001002
    Description:

    This study analyses the results of the tax permission question (the choice of reporting income by interview or giving Statistics Canada permission to access tax records) in the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) for the reference year 1997. Rates are compared among various sub-groups of the population to see if there are any variations based on identifiable characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-03-08

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2001001
    Description:

    This user's guide provides a detailed description of the CD-ROM Income trends in Canada (13F0022XCB). It also provides a glossary, a description of the major concepts as well as an overview of the data source, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2001-02-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This document briefly describes the Survey of Financial Security and presents the questionnaire used for the interview. The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) was conducted during May and June of 1999. The information was collected by personal interview, using a paper questionnaire. Introductory material was sent to the respondent prior to the first contact by the interviewer.

    Approximately 23,000 dwellings were selected for the sample, most using the Labour Force Survey frame. The high-income sample was drawn from geographic areas with a larger concentration of high-income households.

    The survey collected the following type of information: (1) general demographic information on all members of the family, (2) more detailed information on the education, employment, income, etc., on those family members 15 years of age and older, and, (3) asset and debt information on the family as a whole.

    Release date: 2001-01-24

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2000017
    Description:

    This paper incorporates a detailed description of the methods used to arrive at the various low income cut-offs. It also provides an explanation of how base years are defined and how the cut-offs are updated using the Consumer Price Index.

    Release date: 2001-01-10

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