Statistics by subject – Income, pensions, spending and wealth

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All (24)

All (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011074
    Description:

    Discussions of pension adequacy for elderly Canadians have used the rate at which income falls with age; the income replacement rate or the ratio of post-retirement income to pre-retirement income. Use of income streams to assess post-retirement welfare requires a standard against which adequacy of the replacement rates can be judged. Because some expenditures (for example, work-related expenses) can be expected to fall after retirement, a declining income stream does not necessarily signal financial problems for seniors. More importantly, income as normally measured captures only part of what is available to seniors if households possess assets, which in retirement are not being used to generate measured income.

    This paper uses a different metric, referred to as "potential" income. Potential income is the sum of realized income and the income that could be realized from owned assets such as mutual funds and housing. Households prepare for retirement by saving and borrowing and investing the proceeds. The assets accumulated over a lifetime may or may not be drawn down in later years. If they are not, income streams underestimate the "potential" income available to support retirement. This paper takes this potential into account when comparing the pre- and post-retirement financial status of Canadian households.

    Release date: 2011-11-21

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011004
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2009.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011003
    Description:

    Existing studies on Canadian poverty (or low-income) dynamics are mainly based on 1990s data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database or the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). These studies typically rely on a single low-income threshold.

    Our work extends the existing studies beyond 1999 by using SLID data from Panel 3 (1999 to 2004) and Panel 4 (2002 to 2007). We consider all three low-income thresholds established by federal departments: Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (LICO) and low-income measure (LIM), and the market basket measure (MBM) of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411551
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311529
    Description:

    This study examines the financial situation of individuals living in low-income families with at least one employed family member compared to low-income families with no employed family members and employed non-low-income families. It presents new findings from the Canadian Financial Capability Survey on the level of net worth, assets and debts, financial security and retirement preparation of these groups.

    Release date: 2011-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011335
    Description:

    In this study, the income management strategies of Canadian couples are examined using data from the 2007 General Social Survey. The extent to which "older" couples, in which at least one spouse or partner is aged 45 or older, employ an allocative, pooled, or separate strategy is explored. Results show that the income management strategies used by these couples are correlated with relationship characteristics, such as common-law status, duration of relationship, and the presence of children. As well, the likelihood of using a separate approach is positively correlated with levels of educational attainment and with the amount of income received by wives or female partners.

    Release date: 2011-06-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2011001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2009 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2011-06-16

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2011-06-15

  • Public use microdata: 62M0004X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file for the Survey of Household Spending provides detailed information on household expenditures, dwelling characteristics, and ownership of household equipment such as appliances, communications and entertainment equipment, and vehicles.

    Release date: 2011-06-03

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011001
    Description:

    Households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these inter-household transfers add up to a sizable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, inter-household transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income-except court-ordered alimony and child support payments. Because inter-household transfers affect a household's ability to consume goods (Smeeding and Weinburg, 2001), they are important in measuring a household's economic well-being. This paper examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary inter-household transfers, and provides a portrait of voluntary inter-household transfer in Canada. This paper uses the recent data on inter-household transfers from Statistics Canada's income, expenditure, and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211455
    Description:

    Some households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these interhousehold transfers add up to a sizeable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, voluntary interhousehold transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income. This article examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary interhousehold transfers, and provides a profile of voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada. It uses recent data on interhousehold transfers from income, expenditure and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100111432
    Description:

    The value of education and the benefits that flow from it are substantial for many Canadian families. Previous research has found that Canadian parents are strongly committed to their children's postsecondary education. However, many parents of children under the age of 18 are confronted with a number of competing savings priorities. Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines who saves for postsecondary education and how they do so.

    Release date: 2011-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211429
    Description:

    Mortgages consistently account for two-thirds of Canadians' household debt. This study uses the Survey of Household Spending to examine the characteristics of mortgagees and the size of their payments. It focuses on mortgage payments expressed as a percentage of disposable income-the mortgage-liability ratio. This analysis highlights differences in personal characteristics, and spending and saving patterns among households with higher and lower mortgage-liability ratios.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211428
    Description:

    It is often assumed that over the life course most older workers will pay off their debts and save for retirement. However, research from the United States suggests that an increasing number of seniors who are in pre-retirement or are retired are now struggling with debt. This article uses the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to look at the proportion, type and level of debt among Canadian retirees age 55 and over. It examines the socio-economic and demographic factors influencing the likelihood of carrying any debt in retirement. The financial circumstances of indebted retirees are also examined, including three indicators of financial security.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111430
    Description:

    Although Canada fared better in the 2008 economic downturn than many other countries, increasing levels of household debt remain a concern. This article explores rising levels of household debt over the past 40 years using National Accounts data. It also uses data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to examine which types of families are most likely to experience high levels of debt - that is, to make debt payments greater than 40% of their pre-tax household income, to have a debt-to-asset ratio of over 80%, and to have a high debt-to-income ratio relative to other family types.

    Release date: 2011-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011067
    Description:

    Studies of pre- and post-retirement annual income have focused on the extent to which income falls at this crucial stage in life. Although these studies vary in scope and intent, the overall consensus is that the Canadian retirement income system provides income replacement rates that are in the excess of 60% to 70% for a plurality of Canadians, especially for those who had low incomes during their prime working years. However, little has been published on the extent to which retirees maintain their same levels of consumption. Using data from the Survey of Family Expenditures (FAMEX) and from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this study develops a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by individuals in their late 40s (in the early 1980s) differ from those of a group of households headed by individuals in their early 70s (in the late 2000s). It finds that, even though the nature of consumption changes over time, the overall levels of consumption "per adult" do not decline by substantial amounts among Canadians as they age.

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211417
    Description:

    Previous studies of older Canadians well-being have focused on changes in income as individuals age and leave the workforce. However, little has been published on the extent to which consumption levels change in this transitional period. This study uses data from the Survey of Family Expenditures and the Survey of Household Spending to develop a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by those born in the late 1930s changed from middle age (in the early 1980s) to retirement (in the late 2000s).

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111413
    Description:

    Many things influence how Canadians navigate their way through the many financial options and services available. One of the factors affecting the finances of individuals is their level of financial knowledge. This article uses the objective assessment (quiz) of financial knowledge that was asked as part of the Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) in 2009. It explores, for the first time in a national Canadian context, how personal financial knowledge is related to someone's socio-demographic characteristics and other financial behaviours such as having a budget or having investments.

    Release date: 2011-03-08

  • Public use microdata: 11-625-X
    Description:

    This subscription-based service offers institutional access to the collection of available Statistics Canada public use microdata files (PUMF). For a yearly fee, designated contacts at subscribing institutions can have unlimited access to all microdata and documentation available in the PUMF collection. Public use microdata files contain anonymized, non-aggregated data. Using statistical software, the end user can group and manipulate data variables in these files to suit data and research requirements.

    Release date: 2011-01-17

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111612
    Description:

    Research suggests that the division of labour and men's and women's role expectations are continuing to evolve. This may be especially true for Generation Y, those born between 1980 and 1995, who grew up during a period of changing family dynamics and family formation. This article examines the changes in the participation in, and time spent on, paid jobs and unpaid household work for individuals age 20 to 29 from three generations - late Baby Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y.

    Release date: 2011-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011339
    Description:

    This study examines how the risk of job loss and the short-term earnings losses of laid-off workers evolved between the late 1970s and the mid-2000s.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011074
    Description:

    Discussions of pension adequacy for elderly Canadians have used the rate at which income falls with age; the income replacement rate or the ratio of post-retirement income to pre-retirement income. Use of income streams to assess post-retirement welfare requires a standard against which adequacy of the replacement rates can be judged. Because some expenditures (for example, work-related expenses) can be expected to fall after retirement, a declining income stream does not necessarily signal financial problems for seniors. More importantly, income as normally measured captures only part of what is available to seniors if households possess assets, which in retirement are not being used to generate measured income.

    This paper uses a different metric, referred to as "potential" income. Potential income is the sum of realized income and the income that could be realized from owned assets such as mutual funds and housing. Households prepare for retirement by saving and borrowing and investing the proceeds. The assets accumulated over a lifetime may or may not be drawn down in later years. If they are not, income streams underestimate the "potential" income available to support retirement. This paper takes this potential into account when comparing the pre- and post-retirement financial status of Canadian households.

    Release date: 2011-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411535
    Description:

    About 1 in 6 Canadian workers is self-employed. Does taking on the responsibility of a business result in greater earning potential? More wealth? Affect spending patterns? This paper uses a variety of data sources to examine how the self-employed differ from paid employees in income level and dispersion, wealth, retirement preparation and spending.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411551
    Description:

    This product presents the latest facts and figures on gambling in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311529
    Description:

    This study examines the financial situation of individuals living in low-income families with at least one employed family member compared to low-income families with no employed family members and employed non-low-income families. It presents new findings from the Canadian Financial Capability Survey on the level of net worth, assets and debts, financial security and retirement preparation of these groups.

    Release date: 2011-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011335
    Description:

    In this study, the income management strategies of Canadian couples are examined using data from the 2007 General Social Survey. The extent to which "older" couples, in which at least one spouse or partner is aged 45 or older, employ an allocative, pooled, or separate strategy is explored. Results show that the income management strategies used by these couples are correlated with relationship characteristics, such as common-law status, duration of relationship, and the presence of children. As well, the likelihood of using a separate approach is positively correlated with levels of educational attainment and with the amount of income received by wives or female partners.

    Release date: 2011-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211455
    Description:

    Some households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these interhousehold transfers add up to a sizeable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, voluntary interhousehold transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income. This article examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary interhousehold transfers, and provides a profile of voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada. It uses recent data on interhousehold transfers from income, expenditure and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100111432
    Description:

    The value of education and the benefits that flow from it are substantial for many Canadian families. Previous research has found that Canadian parents are strongly committed to their children's postsecondary education. However, many parents of children under the age of 18 are confronted with a number of competing savings priorities. Based on data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines who saves for postsecondary education and how they do so.

    Release date: 2011-05-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211429
    Description:

    Mortgages consistently account for two-thirds of Canadians' household debt. This study uses the Survey of Household Spending to examine the characteristics of mortgagees and the size of their payments. It focuses on mortgage payments expressed as a percentage of disposable income-the mortgage-liability ratio. This analysis highlights differences in personal characteristics, and spending and saving patterns among households with higher and lower mortgage-liability ratios.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211428
    Description:

    It is often assumed that over the life course most older workers will pay off their debts and save for retirement. However, research from the United States suggests that an increasing number of seniors who are in pre-retirement or are retired are now struggling with debt. This article uses the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to look at the proportion, type and level of debt among Canadian retirees age 55 and over. It examines the socio-economic and demographic factors influencing the likelihood of carrying any debt in retirement. The financial circumstances of indebted retirees are also examined, including three indicators of financial security.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111430
    Description:

    Although Canada fared better in the 2008 economic downturn than many other countries, increasing levels of household debt remain a concern. This article explores rising levels of household debt over the past 40 years using National Accounts data. It also uses data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to examine which types of families are most likely to experience high levels of debt - that is, to make debt payments greater than 40% of their pre-tax household income, to have a debt-to-asset ratio of over 80%, and to have a high debt-to-income ratio relative to other family types.

    Release date: 2011-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011067
    Description:

    Studies of pre- and post-retirement annual income have focused on the extent to which income falls at this crucial stage in life. Although these studies vary in scope and intent, the overall consensus is that the Canadian retirement income system provides income replacement rates that are in the excess of 60% to 70% for a plurality of Canadians, especially for those who had low incomes during their prime working years. However, little has been published on the extent to which retirees maintain their same levels of consumption. Using data from the Survey of Family Expenditures (FAMEX) and from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this study develops a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by individuals in their late 40s (in the early 1980s) differ from those of a group of households headed by individuals in their early 70s (in the late 2000s). It finds that, even though the nature of consumption changes over time, the overall levels of consumption "per adult" do not decline by substantial amounts among Canadians as they age.

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211417
    Description:

    Previous studies of older Canadians well-being have focused on changes in income as individuals age and leave the workforce. However, little has been published on the extent to which consumption levels change in this transitional period. This study uses data from the Survey of Family Expenditures and the Survey of Household Spending to develop a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by those born in the late 1930s changed from middle age (in the early 1980s) to retirement (in the late 2000s).

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111413
    Description:

    Many things influence how Canadians navigate their way through the many financial options and services available. One of the factors affecting the finances of individuals is their level of financial knowledge. This article uses the objective assessment (quiz) of financial knowledge that was asked as part of the Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) in 2009. It explores, for the first time in a national Canadian context, how personal financial knowledge is related to someone's socio-demographic characteristics and other financial behaviours such as having a budget or having investments.

    Release date: 2011-03-08

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011004
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2009.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011003
    Description:

    Existing studies on Canadian poverty (or low-income) dynamics are mainly based on 1990s data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database or the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). These studies typically rely on a single low-income threshold.

    Our work extends the existing studies beyond 1999 by using SLID data from Panel 3 (1999 to 2004) and Panel 4 (2002 to 2007). We consider all three low-income thresholds established by federal departments: Statistics Canada's low-income cut-off (LICO) and low-income measure (LIM), and the market basket measure (MBM) of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2011001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2009 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2011-06-16

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011002
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Human Resources and Skill Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2011-06-15

  • Technical products: 75F0002M2011001
    Description:

    Households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these inter-household transfers add up to a sizable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, inter-household transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income-except court-ordered alimony and child support payments. Because inter-household transfers affect a household's ability to consume goods (Smeeding and Weinburg, 2001), they are important in measuring a household's economic well-being. This paper examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary inter-household transfers, and provides a portrait of voluntary inter-household transfer in Canada. This paper uses the recent data on inter-household transfers from Statistics Canada's income, expenditure, and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

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