Statistics by subject – Individual and household Internet use

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  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017039
    Description:

    Based on data from the General Social Survey on Canadians’ Safety, this infographic looks at instances of cyberstalking in Canada by region, age, sex and marital status.

    Release date: 2017-12-04

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017032
    Description:

    The purpose of the 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home is to explore the lifestyle behaviour of Canadians at work and at home. The section on the use of technology, in the infographic, shows the types of digital devices people own, the frequency of Internet use and the impact technology has on life.

    Release date: 2017-11-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114693
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2014 General Social Survey, this article examines the characteristics associated with being a victim of cyberbullying or cyberstalking within the last five years for the population aged 15 to 29. This article also examines the association between cyberbullying and cyberstalking and various indicators of trust, personal behaviour and mental health.

    Release date: 2016-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014002
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. The CIUS consists of a household component that measures home access, and an individual component that measures online behaviours, including the use of e-commerce.

    This infographic describes some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2010.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014003
    Description:

    In 2010, the Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member, including the use of e-commerce.

    This infographic describes some results of the Canadian Internet Use and e-Commerce survey of 2012.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-11-26

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111768
    Description:

    In recent years, older Canadians have increased their Internet usage and are closing the gap with younger Canadians. However, older Canadians do not use the Internet as much for their consumption of cultural products, for example listening to music and watching videos. This study examines the extent to which seniors 65 and over are using the Internet as a source of cultural content, particularly music.

    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
    Description:

    This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

    Release date: 2009-08-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110816
    Description:

    The adoption and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) by individuals and businesses in part determines a country's ability to participate successfully in the global information economy. As the Internet is an essential component of ICT infrastructure, its use has become a key hallmark of this participation. In order to situate Internet use both geographically and over time, this study compares 2005 and 2007 Canadian use rates with those of other selected countries, as well as among Canadian provinces.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
    Description:

    The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

    Release date: 2007-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210328
    Description:

    Although small firms were less likely than large firms to identify benefits from conducting business online, there has been growth in the proportion of firms indicating perceived benefits over the past five years in all size categories.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007003
    Description:

    This study investigates factors that influence Internet use with an emphasis on rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039533
    Description:

    Over the past decade, Internet content has evolved to the point where it now represents a significant source of information and entertainment for many people. The Internet has changed the way that many individuals and organizations gather information, and has undoubtedly had some influence on their use of traditional media. While few Canadians had Internet access and went online to gather news information in the mid-1990's, today many use the Internet to access online newspapers, reports, discussion forums and even blogs. In 2005 for example, about 62% of home Internet users - or 38% of Canadian adults overall - went online to view news or sports information (Statistics Canada 2006).

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006048
    Description:

    This study analyzes drug sales by type of retailer between 1998 and 2005. The analysis focuses on the competition between pharmacies, food stores and general merchandise stores. Retail sales of drugs in Canada are also compared with those of the United States. The main source of data is the Quarterly Retail Commodity Survey.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006013
    Description:

    This study aims to develop a better understanding of the social impacts associated with Internet use in Canada. Although much work has been accomplished on the penetration and use of the Internet, this study uses data from the General Social Survey, Cycle 19: Time Use to better understand how personal use of the Internet fits in the day-to-day lives of Canadians.

    The survey provides a time-diary account of respondent activities over a 24-hour period, enabling detailed comparisons among heavy Internet users, moderate users, and non-Internet users and their time allocation decisions. Heavy Internet users spent more time alone during the diary day than non-Internet users, even when compared to people of the same social and demographic background. Although they spent less time with family and friends, many heavy Internet users participated in online activities involving social interaction, such as email or chatting with others.

    Release date: 2006-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019098
    Description:

    This article examines age and how relates to patterns of computer and Internet use. While age is often connected with the likelihood that someone will own or have access to computers and the Internet, age also bears strong relationships to behavior and participation in online activities, much as it does with activities in life in general.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

Reference (16)

Reference (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4432
    Release date: 2013-10-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2010002
    Description:

    This paper investigates the intensity and scope of Internet usage among individual Canadians, based on data from the 2005 and 2007 Canadian Internet Use Surveys (CIUS). It profiles various aspects of online behaviour and analyzes the 2007 findings to examine patterns of scope of Internet use by user characteristics. Multivariate analyses are applied to explore the relationships among Internet use behaviour and characteristics such as age, sex, income, and education.

    In addition to the shift from dial-up to high-speed Internet access that has been occurring among Canadian Internet users, the 2005 to 2007 period also saw a slight increase in the proportion of users who were online daily and for at least five hours per week. While this proportion is growing, fewer than 50% of Canadian Internet users were characterized as high intensity users in 2005 and 2007. Among individuals with high-speed connections, the low intensity users continued to outnumber the high intensity ones, challenging the notion that access to a high speed connection leads to intensive Internet usage. Among Internet users, age, income, sex, and years of online experience were all associated with the propensity to engage in online activities and to use the Internet intensively. The finding that experienced Internet users do use the Internet in more extensive ways underscores the importance of studying the nature of Internet users as they gain more experience.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2009005
    Description:

    Before the Internet was launched commercially, few people outside the scientific and academic worlds were aware of this new technology. Commerce has since changed in unimaginable ways and it is now possible to search, purchase and sell just about anything over the Internet. Using data from Statistics Canada's Internet use surveys, this research examines the data, trends and patterns in Canadian online shopping from 2001 to 2007.

    Release date: 2009-12-15

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2008003
    Description:

    Canadians were early adopters of broadband Internet services, and Canada continues to lead the G7 group of industrialized countries in broadband penetration. In 2003, approximately 65% of Canadian households with home Internet connections had broadband connections, a number that increased to 81% in 2005. It is assumed that the high adoption rates reflect a population that is well-prepared to use the Internet to access education, health, government, business and entertainment services. However, the adoption of broadband alone is not a panacea for users. How the broadband connection is used is critical to understanding impacts. By analyzing Statistics Canada's Household Internet Use Survey (HIUS) data, this paper makes the case that not all broadband households are the same. It demonstrates that understanding how often and for what purposes Canadian households are using their broadband connections allows for a fuller examination of Internet usage than simply measuring broadband access rates. As the data will show, broadband access does not imply full usage of broadband services. This study identifies differences within broadband households, and explains why it is important to recognize the differences in their usage behaviours.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20050008658
    Description:

    The vast majority of Internet service providers (ISPs) in Canada are small- and medium-sized companies striving to compete with large and more dominant telecommunication and cable companies.

    Based on data from Statistics Canada's Annual Survey of Internet Service Providers and Related Services for 2000 and 2002, this article compares the performance and characteristics of fast-growing small- and mid-sized Canadian ISPs with those of their slower-growing counterparts. The study also examines the different strategies employed by the two groups as well as their differing perceptions of potential impediments to their growth.

    The main findings relate to the effects of the two groups' business strategies on their core business and diversification, revenues and expenses, broadband and narrowband services, subscriber base and customer retention rates, connection options and growth impediments.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004027
    Description:

    This activity looks at the different ways in which technology is used on the farm.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004028
    Description:

    This lesson focuses on computer use on farms. As in other parts of society, computers are a part of farmers' lives. Computers provide much-needed information on farms and facilitate activities such as banking, marketing, communications and research.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Index and guides: 56M0002G
    Description:

    This guide is for the Household Internet Use Survey microdata file. The Household Internet Use Survey is being conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. The information from this survey will assist the Science and Technology Redesign Project at Statistics Canada to fulfil a three-year contractual agreement between them and the Telecommunications and Policy Branch of Industry Canada. The Household Internet Use Survey is a voluntary survey. It will provide information on the use of computers for communication purposes, and households' access and use of the Internet from home.

    The objective of this survey is to measure the demand for telecommunications services by Canadian households. To assess the demand, we measure the frequency and intensity of use of what is commonly referred to as "the information highway" among other things. This was done by asking questions relating to the accessibility of the Internet to Canadian households both at home, the workplace and a number of other locations. The information collected will be used to update and expand upon previous studies done by Statistics Canada on the topic of the Information Highway.

    Release date: 2004-09-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004066
    Description:

    Recent studies have shown that fewer rural Canadians were using the Internet than urban Canadians, despite new developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) (Thompson-James 1999, McLaren 2002). The growth of the Internet has been portrayed as an innovative medium for the exchange of information, which could provide new opportunities to rural Canadians. The purpose of this study is to estimate and to analyse the determinants of Internet use by Canadians in order to understand the factors associated with lower Internet use in rural Canada, with specific emphasis on whether 'rurality' acts as an independent factor on Internet use.

    Release date: 2004-01-06

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Technical products: 21-601-M1999040
    Description:

    This paper looks at where Canadians in rural and small town households are using computers and the Internet (home, work, etc.) and what the common usages are (general browsing, e-mail, etc.).

    Release date: 2000-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4441
    Release date: 1999-12-09

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