Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110816
    Description:

    The adoption and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) by individuals and businesses in part determines a country's ability to participate successfully in the global information economy. As the Internet is an essential component of ICT infrastructure, its use has become a key hallmark of this participation. In order to situate Internet use both geographically and over time, this study compares 2005 and 2007 Canadian use rates with those of other selected countries, as well as among Canadian provinces.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Table: 56-001-X200800110653
    Description:

    This publication presents financial and operating statistics for telecommunications services industries, except the Cable and Other Program Distribution industry.

    Release date: 2008-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
    Description:

    Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Table: 56-001-X200700110107
    Description:

    This publication presents financial and operating statistics for telecommunications services industries, except the Cable and Other Program Distribution industry

    Release date: 2007-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Table: 56-001-X20060019281
    Description:

    This publication presents financial and operating statistics for telecommunications services industries, except the Cable and Other Program Distribution industry

    Release date: 2006-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037017
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey, this article reports on computer and technology access and use in Canadian schools. Information is provided on student-to-computer ratios, technology applications that are available to students, and principals' assessments of the extent to which teachers have the technical skills to use computer technologies for administrative purposes and for effectively incorporating computer technology into teaching practices.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016801
    Description:

    Despite stagnating revenues, the telecommunication services industry improved its profits during the first half of 2003 by controlling operating costs and reducing capital spending. The industry recorded $2.6 billion in profits, up a robust 19.4%. A strong financial performance of the wireless sector was achieved in spite of a significant slowdown in the expansion of its customer base. The telecommunication services industry has continued to slash its capital expenditures. In the first six months of 2003, these expenditures amounted to $1.9 billion, down from $2.8 billion for the same period in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016799
    Description:

    The recent explosive demand for cell phones, personal computers and Internet access has propelled the growth of industries producing information and communication technologies (ICT) goods and services. With Quebec and Ontario accounting for over 85% of ICT manufacturing, the 'high-tech meltdown' was damaging to both provinces, dragging down an otherwise growing manufacturing sector in 2001 and chopping the growth in the 2002 recovery. Unlike manufacturing, the production of ICT services in all provinces exhibited robust growth rates from 1997 to 2002, providing a major source of growth to the service sector, as well as to the total gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036381
    Description:

    Canada's telecommunications service providers and their network infrastructure have kept Canadians connected for over a century. The industry has undergone significant growth and transformation. Statistics Canada data is examined to measure the impacts and outcomes of the regulatory decisions that have helped shape the state of telecommunications services in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025756
    Description:

    Revenues increase 8.5%! Profit - a 5% increase! Capital expenditures still strong! Employment shows growth. Read the highlights of industry indicators for the Canadian telecommunications sector.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

  • Table: 56-203-X19980005636
    Description:

    This paper focuses on analysing market shares of supplier and size group. It is a follow-up to the initial telecommunications market analysis presented in the 1997 edition of Telecommunications in Canada (Cat. No. 56-203).

    Release date: 2001-04-17

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110816
    Description:

    The adoption and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) by individuals and businesses in part determines a country's ability to participate successfully in the global information economy. As the Internet is an essential component of ICT infrastructure, its use has become a key hallmark of this participation. In order to situate Internet use both geographically and over time, this study compares 2005 and 2007 Canadian use rates with those of other selected countries, as well as among Canadian provinces.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
    Description:

    Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037017
    Description:

    Drawing on data from the 2003-2004 Information and Communications Technologies in Schools Survey, this article reports on computer and technology access and use in Canadian schools. Information is provided on student-to-computer ratios, technology applications that are available to students, and principals' assessments of the extent to which teachers have the technical skills to use computer technologies for administrative purposes and for effectively incorporating computer technology into teaching practices.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016801
    Description:

    Despite stagnating revenues, the telecommunication services industry improved its profits during the first half of 2003 by controlling operating costs and reducing capital spending. The industry recorded $2.6 billion in profits, up a robust 19.4%. A strong financial performance of the wireless sector was achieved in spite of a significant slowdown in the expansion of its customer base. The telecommunication services industry has continued to slash its capital expenditures. In the first six months of 2003, these expenditures amounted to $1.9 billion, down from $2.8 billion for the same period in 2002.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016799
    Description:

    The recent explosive demand for cell phones, personal computers and Internet access has propelled the growth of industries producing information and communication technologies (ICT) goods and services. With Quebec and Ontario accounting for over 85% of ICT manufacturing, the 'high-tech meltdown' was damaging to both provinces, dragging down an otherwise growing manufacturing sector in 2001 and chopping the growth in the 2002 recovery. Unlike manufacturing, the production of ICT services in all provinces exhibited robust growth rates from 1997 to 2002, providing a major source of growth to the service sector, as well as to the total gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036381
    Description:

    Canada's telecommunications service providers and their network infrastructure have kept Canadians connected for over a century. The industry has undergone significant growth and transformation. Statistics Canada data is examined to measure the impacts and outcomes of the regulatory decisions that have helped shape the state of telecommunications services in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025756
    Description:

    Revenues increase 8.5%! Profit - a 5% increase! Capital expenditures still strong! Employment shows growth. Read the highlights of industry indicators for the Canadian telecommunications sector.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

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