Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210328
    Description:

    Although small firms were less likely than large firms to identify benefits from conducting business online, there has been growth in the proportion of firms indicating perceived benefits over the past five years in all size categories.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060018804
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017765
    Description:

    The percentage of firms using an extranet in Canada remains low with just over 6% of private firms using an extranet in 2003. Nonetheless, extranets could become an important part of the e-business landscape in Canada. This article examines the functionality of extranets that Canadian firms are currently employing.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016793
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology revealed that an increasing percentage of firms continue to adopt and use e-commerce and information communication technologies (ICTs). Firms in the service industry are more likely to adopt e-commerce and ICTs than those in primary or secondary industries. In addition, as a whole, public sector firms continue to have a higher rate of ICT use than firms in the private sector.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

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Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700410375
    Description:

    This article investigates the use of the Internet for education-related reasons based on findings from the 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS). After providing an overview of Internet use in Canada, the article describes selected social, economic and geographic characteristics of those going online for education-related reasons. It then examines specific reasons for going online for education-related purposes, including for distance education, self-directed learning and correspondence courses. Finally, it examines urban and rural differences among those using the Internet for distance education.

    Release date: 2007-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210328
    Description:

    Although small firms were less likely than large firms to identify benefits from conducting business online, there has been growth in the proportion of firms indicating perceived benefits over the past five years in all size categories.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210327
    Description:

    Internet use is an important hallmark for participation in an information society. Although 68% of adult Canadians went online for personal, non-business reasons in 2005, digital inequality persists both geographically and among certain population groups. While much research and policy attention has been aimed at understanding the barriers to Internet use, there were an estimated 850,000 Canadians who had used the Internet at one time but were no longer doing so in 2005. Who are these former users and why have they discontinued their use of the Internet?

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019624
    Description:

    The Internet has changed the way many Canadians conduct their everyday activities, from viewing weather, news and sports to banking and paying bills. It has also changed the way many shop. In 2005, Canadians placed almost 50 million online orders valued at $7.9 billion. However, many of these orders were made by a relatively small group of people. In fact, Canada's top online spenders represented fewer than 7% of adult Canadians and accounted for three-quarters of total online expenditures to consumers. Who are these Canadians and what are they buying?

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060018804
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017765
    Description:

    The percentage of firms using an extranet in Canada remains low with just over 6% of private firms using an extranet in 2003. Nonetheless, extranets could become an important part of the e-business landscape in Canada. This article examines the functionality of extranets that Canadian firms are currently employing.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037433
    Description:

    This article examines the possible functions of an intranet and the types of Canadian firms that are using them. Some organizations are uncertain about what purpose an intranet serves and whether they may benefit from using one.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016793
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology revealed that an increasing percentage of firms continue to adopt and use e-commerce and information communication technologies (ICTs). Firms in the service industry are more likely to adopt e-commerce and ICTs than those in primary or secondary industries. In addition, as a whole, public sector firms continue to have a higher rate of ICT use than firms in the private sector.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

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