Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (6)

All (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Public use microdata: 56M0001X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada was approached by Stentor Resource Centre Incorporated to conduct a survey to monitor the telephone penetration rates across Canada. The survey determines if the respondents have a telephone line in their residence. If they do not have a telephone line, information is collected as to the reasons why. Information is also collected on the income characteristics of the selected households.

    The management of the survey was transferred from Stentor to Bell Canada in the Fall of 1998.

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) supplementary capacity is used to conduct this biannual survey. A sample of approximately 44,000 respondents is used for this survey (five out of six rotation groups). The survey data are collected using Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI). The first data collection procedure took place during November's LFS week in 1996.

    This microdata file is prepared biannually and contains the variables from the survey, plus geographical variables from the LFS (province, census metropolitan area, urban/rural breakdown). No other variables from the LFS are added to the file.

    Release date: 2014-12-12

  • Public use microdata: 56M0005X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Individual Component is administered in a similar fashion to the individual-level surveys conducted in prior years. Following the Household Component, an individual aged 16 years and older is randomly selected and asked about their use of the Internet, and online activities including electronic commerce. While the Household Component covers Internet access at home, the Individual Component covers uses of the Internet from any location. This content is supplemented by individual and household characteristics (e.g. age, household income, family type) and some geographical detail (e.g. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

    Release date: 2012-11-23

  • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-06-29

  • Public use microdata: 87M0013X
    Description:

    In March 1996, Statistics Canada conducted the National Electronic Media Use Survey (NEMUS) on behalf of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). The survey was a random-digit dialing survey which interviewed approximately 2,000 Canadians, 18 years of age and older, to evaluate their television viewing, radio listening and Internet use habits. Telephone numbers were selected randomly by computer from all possible telephone numbers in the provinces of Canada. Selection of sample took into consideration linguistics (English and French language), size of population by province as well as differences associated with unique large Census Metropolitan Areas such as Montreal and Toronto. The lowest level of geography provided on the file is Canada excluding the Northwest Territories and the Yukon.

    Release date: 1996-08-26

Data (6)

Data (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Public use microdata: 56M0001X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada was approached by Stentor Resource Centre Incorporated to conduct a survey to monitor the telephone penetration rates across Canada. The survey determines if the respondents have a telephone line in their residence. If they do not have a telephone line, information is collected as to the reasons why. Information is also collected on the income characteristics of the selected households.

    The management of the survey was transferred from Stentor to Bell Canada in the Fall of 1998.

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) supplementary capacity is used to conduct this biannual survey. A sample of approximately 44,000 respondents is used for this survey (five out of six rotation groups). The survey data are collected using Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI). The first data collection procedure took place during November's LFS week in 1996.

    This microdata file is prepared biannually and contains the variables from the survey, plus geographical variables from the LFS (province, census metropolitan area, urban/rural breakdown). No other variables from the LFS are added to the file.

    Release date: 2014-12-12

  • Public use microdata: 56M0005X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Individual Component is administered in a similar fashion to the individual-level surveys conducted in prior years. Following the Household Component, an individual aged 16 years and older is randomly selected and asked about their use of the Internet, and online activities including electronic commerce. While the Household Component covers Internet access at home, the Individual Component covers uses of the Internet from any location. This content is supplemented by individual and household characteristics (e.g. age, household income, family type) and some geographical detail (e.g. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

    Release date: 2012-11-23

  • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-06-29

  • Public use microdata: 87M0013X
    Description:

    In March 1996, Statistics Canada conducted the National Electronic Media Use Survey (NEMUS) on behalf of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). The survey was a random-digit dialing survey which interviewed approximately 2,000 Canadians, 18 years of age and older, to evaluate their television viewing, radio listening and Internet use habits. Telephone numbers were selected randomly by computer from all possible telephone numbers in the provinces of Canada. Selection of sample took into consideration linguistics (English and French language), size of population by province as well as differences associated with unique large Census Metropolitan Areas such as Montreal and Toronto. The lowest level of geography provided on the file is Canada excluding the Northwest Territories and the Yukon.

    Release date: 1996-08-26

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