Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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All (24)

All (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Table: 56-001-X20020037898
    Description:

    The cable industry is going through a fundamental transformation. Only a few years ago, this regulated industry could be described as consisting of territorial monopolies engaged in the delivery of analogue programming services. Since 1997 the regulatory environment has evolved, new techonologies and services have emerged, and service providers have been positioning themselves in existing and new markets.

    Release date: 2002-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036377
    Description:

    After several difficult years, radio is making a comeback. Total revenues in the radio industry reached over $1 billion. This increase is partly explained by the launch of new stations, but mainly due to FM broadcasting, with 71% of the industry revenues coming from the FM sector.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036382
    Description:

    The increased penetration of direct-to-home satellite services and digital cable has had a profound impact on revenues, profits and employment in the Canadian television industry. Speciality television services reported revenues of $1.2 billion in 2001; a striking increase of almost 14% from 2000.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036381
    Description:

    Canada's telecommunications service providers and their network infrastructure have kept Canadians connected for over a century. The industry has undergone significant growth and transformation. Statistics Canada data is examined to measure the impacts and outcomes of the regulatory decisions that have helped shape the state of telecommunications services in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036380
    Description:

    Despite the increased availability of high speed Internet by cable, there continues to be a significant lack of access in smaller communities in Canada. More than 70% of cable homes (homes with access to cable) in small communities did not have access to high-speed Internet by cable in 2001.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002008
    Description:

    This paper focusses on recent market concentration among the various telecommunications products and markets. It also touches on issues such as price behaviour and the market structure of telecommunications services.

    Release date: 2002-10-08

  • Table: 56F0009X
    Description:

    This is a condensed version of the study Unveiling the digital divide (Connectedness series), catalogue no. 56F0004MIE no. 7, and covers the same subject matter. The digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots', has emerged as an important issue of our times, largely due to the uneven diffusion of the Internet.

    Many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities. Thus, divides can be defined for any permutation of the above. In the case of ICTs, divides depend on the specific technology, its timing of introduction, as well as the variable of interest.

    This study shows that the digital divide is sizeable; ICT penetration rates grow with income. Generally, the effect of income is larger on newer ICTs (Internet, computers, cell phones) than older and established ones (television, telephone). Then, using the Internet penetration of households by detailed income level, it finds that in an overall sense the Internet divide is slowly closing. This, however, is the result of the accelerated adoption of the Internet by middle-income households - particularly upper middle. The Internet divide is widening when the lowest income deciles are compared with the highest income decile.

    At the same time, the rates of growth of Internet adoption among lower-income households exceed those of higher-income households. This is typical of penetration patterns of ICT and non-ICT commodities. Rates of growth are initially very high among high-income groups, but at later stages it is the penetration of lower-income groups that grows faster.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002007
    Description:

    This paper looks at the digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots.' It examines the many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, that exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026347
    Description:

    This article uses the 2000 General Social Survey to identify the basic characteristics of those Canadians who speak in a public forum.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026346
    Description:

    This article looks at who is most likely to search the Internet for health-related topics, what sort of information is sought and if it is credible.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2002003
    Description:

    This paper explores the relationship between employers' computer technology investments and employees' training and education, with emphasis on the education of new hires.

    Release date: 2002-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002006
    Description:

    This paper examines the relationship between e-business and firm size.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Table: 56-001-X20020027908
    Description:

    In an era where the financial difficulties and opportunities of new media draw much attention, the oldest electronic media is quietl making a comeback after many difficult years in the late 80's and most of the 90's. The industry's profit margin (before interest and taxes) surpassed 10% in 1997 and has increased every year since then.

    Release date: 2002-06-25

  • Table: 56-001-X20020017910
    Description:

    The Canadian television industry is changing. The number of specialty and pay services has steadily increased over the last decade and their contribution to the industry's revenues, profits and employment is growing every year.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026370
    Description:

    Canadian firms are well aware of the benefits of using knowledge management (KM) practices and most of them incorporate some aspects of KM in their management toolkit. Knowledge sharing, creation, generation and maintenance are perceived as important to a firm's productivity.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016194
    Description:

    This article looks at the characteristics of Internet dropouts and infrequent users and compares them with Canadians who use the Net regularly.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2001037
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry. While the industry is relatively small, it is strategically important as good design can make products and services more competitive. At a more detailed level, this article provides a 1998 snapshot of the design industry's five sub-industries: landscape architecture, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and "other" design services.

    The article discusses how these five sub-industries are becoming less distinct. The size of firms and how size might be related to expenses, employment patterns in the industry and characteristics of the design workforce are also studied. Also investigated is the regional distribution of design firms, the types of clients they serve and the activities they undertake. Most of the article's findings are based on results from the 1998 Survey of Specialized Design and the 1996 Census.

    Release date: 2002-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002001
    Description:

    This paper examines capital formation and economic growth for the Canadian business sector. It also studies the contribution of information and communication technologies economic growth and compares the performance of the Canadian and U.S. business sectors.

    Release date: 2002-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016146
    Description:

    This, the first issue of 2002 presents an opportunity to recapitulate some of the findings that we have reported during the life of the Bulletin. In an interview, Dr. Fred Gault, Director of Statistics Canada's Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, discusses some of the findings on innovation, e-commerce, emerging technologies, Internet use, the telecommunications industry, R&D and commercialization.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016147
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturing firms fall into two groups: The first uses patents and trademarks as a part of successful innovation strategy consisting of regular R&D financed by R&D grants and tax credits introducing world-first innovations. These are usually large firms in the technology-intensive core sector. The second group includes firms of all sizes in all sectors that rely mostly on trade secrets. They typically transfer technology from abroad by introducing Canada-first innovations and rely on government information services more than on R&D grants and tax credits.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001005
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) represent both a "problem" and an "opportunity" for rural Canadians. On the one hand, rural employment levels are diminished as more services are supplied to rural Canadians by ICTs - the ubiquitous ATMs (automatic teller machines) are one example. On the other hand, ICTs, and particularly the Internet, provide easier access for rural Canadians to target urban markets and provide urban consumers with easier access to rural goods and services.

    Release date: 2002-01-21

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Table: 56-001-X20020037898
    Description:

    The cable industry is going through a fundamental transformation. Only a few years ago, this regulated industry could be described as consisting of territorial monopolies engaged in the delivery of analogue programming services. Since 1997 the regulatory environment has evolved, new techonologies and services have emerged, and service providers have been positioning themselves in existing and new markets.

    Release date: 2002-11-19

  • Table: 56F0009X
    Description:

    This is a condensed version of the study Unveiling the digital divide (Connectedness series), catalogue no. 56F0004MIE no. 7, and covers the same subject matter. The digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots', has emerged as an important issue of our times, largely due to the uneven diffusion of the Internet.

    Many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities. Thus, divides can be defined for any permutation of the above. In the case of ICTs, divides depend on the specific technology, its timing of introduction, as well as the variable of interest.

    This study shows that the digital divide is sizeable; ICT penetration rates grow with income. Generally, the effect of income is larger on newer ICTs (Internet, computers, cell phones) than older and established ones (television, telephone). Then, using the Internet penetration of households by detailed income level, it finds that in an overall sense the Internet divide is slowly closing. This, however, is the result of the accelerated adoption of the Internet by middle-income households - particularly upper middle. The Internet divide is widening when the lowest income deciles are compared with the highest income decile.

    At the same time, the rates of growth of Internet adoption among lower-income households exceed those of higher-income households. This is typical of penetration patterns of ICT and non-ICT commodities. Rates of growth are initially very high among high-income groups, but at later stages it is the penetration of lower-income groups that grows faster.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Table: 56-001-X20020027908
    Description:

    In an era where the financial difficulties and opportunities of new media draw much attention, the oldest electronic media is quietl making a comeback after many difficult years in the late 80's and most of the 90's. The industry's profit margin (before interest and taxes) surpassed 10% in 1997 and has increased every year since then.

    Release date: 2002-06-25

  • Table: 56-001-X20020017910
    Description:

    The Canadian television industry is changing. The number of specialty and pay services has steadily increased over the last decade and their contribution to the industry's revenues, profits and employment is growing every year.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036377
    Description:

    After several difficult years, radio is making a comeback. Total revenues in the radio industry reached over $1 billion. This increase is partly explained by the launch of new stations, but mainly due to FM broadcasting, with 71% of the industry revenues coming from the FM sector.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036382
    Description:

    The increased penetration of direct-to-home satellite services and digital cable has had a profound impact on revenues, profits and employment in the Canadian television industry. Speciality television services reported revenues of $1.2 billion in 2001; a striking increase of almost 14% from 2000.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036381
    Description:

    Canada's telecommunications service providers and their network infrastructure have kept Canadians connected for over a century. The industry has undergone significant growth and transformation. Statistics Canada data is examined to measure the impacts and outcomes of the regulatory decisions that have helped shape the state of telecommunications services in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036380
    Description:

    Despite the increased availability of high speed Internet by cable, there continues to be a significant lack of access in smaller communities in Canada. More than 70% of cable homes (homes with access to cable) in small communities did not have access to high-speed Internet by cable in 2001.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002008
    Description:

    This paper focusses on recent market concentration among the various telecommunications products and markets. It also touches on issues such as price behaviour and the market structure of telecommunications services.

    Release date: 2002-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002007
    Description:

    This paper looks at the digital divide, commonly understood as the gap between information and communications technology (ICT) 'haves' and 'have-nots.' It examines the many variables, including income, education, age and geographical location, that exert significant influences on household penetration of both ICT and non-ICT commodities.

    Release date: 2002-10-01

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026347
    Description:

    This article uses the 2000 General Social Survey to identify the basic characteristics of those Canadians who speak in a public forum.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026346
    Description:

    This article looks at who is most likely to search the Internet for health-related topics, what sort of information is sought and if it is credible.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2002003
    Description:

    This paper explores the relationship between employers' computer technology investments and employees' training and education, with emphasis on the education of new hires.

    Release date: 2002-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002006
    Description:

    This paper examines the relationship between e-business and firm size.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026370
    Description:

    Canadian firms are well aware of the benefits of using knowledge management (KM) practices and most of them incorporate some aspects of KM in their management toolkit. Knowledge sharing, creation, generation and maintenance are perceived as important to a firm's productivity.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016194
    Description:

    This article looks at the characteristics of Internet dropouts and infrequent users and compares them with Canadians who use the Net regularly.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2001037
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry. While the industry is relatively small, it is strategically important as good design can make products and services more competitive. At a more detailed level, this article provides a 1998 snapshot of the design industry's five sub-industries: landscape architecture, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and "other" design services.

    The article discusses how these five sub-industries are becoming less distinct. The size of firms and how size might be related to expenses, employment patterns in the industry and characteristics of the design workforce are also studied. Also investigated is the regional distribution of design firms, the types of clients they serve and the activities they undertake. Most of the article's findings are based on results from the 1998 Survey of Specialized Design and the 1996 Census.

    Release date: 2002-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002001
    Description:

    This paper examines capital formation and economic growth for the Canadian business sector. It also studies the contribution of information and communication technologies economic growth and compares the performance of the Canadian and U.S. business sectors.

    Release date: 2002-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016146
    Description:

    This, the first issue of 2002 presents an opportunity to recapitulate some of the findings that we have reported during the life of the Bulletin. In an interview, Dr. Fred Gault, Director of Statistics Canada's Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, discusses some of the findings on innovation, e-commerce, emerging technologies, Internet use, the telecommunications industry, R&D and commercialization.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016147
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturing firms fall into two groups: The first uses patents and trademarks as a part of successful innovation strategy consisting of regular R&D financed by R&D grants and tax credits introducing world-first innovations. These are usually large firms in the technology-intensive core sector. The second group includes firms of all sizes in all sectors that rely mostly on trade secrets. They typically transfer technology from abroad by introducing Canada-first innovations and rely on government information services more than on R&D grants and tax credits.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001005
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) represent both a "problem" and an "opportunity" for rural Canadians. On the one hand, rural employment levels are diminished as more services are supplied to rural Canadians by ICTs - the ubiquitous ATMs (automatic teller machines) are one example. On the other hand, ICTs, and particularly the Internet, provide easier access for rural Canadians to target urban markets and provide urban consumers with easier access to rural goods and services.

    Release date: 2002-01-21

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