Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20030036710
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data, and provide or access services.

    This paper describes how a leading IT industry, including computer systems design and related services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. Structural differences between small and large system design firms are explored and data describing industry growth rates, export markets, and employment characteristics are examined.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Table: 56-001-X20030047811
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for wireline and wireless telecommunication services industries for the 1998 to 2001 period.

    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Technical products: 62-014-X
    Description:

    The growth in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector has created a need for more sector-specific economic indicators. Prices Division at Statistics Canada (STC) currently produces price indexes for several ICT goods that include computers and computer equipment or peripherals (e.g., printers and monitors). These indexes measure the price movement of ICT goods at the final or end-purchaser level (i.e., government, businesses and households) for consumption. The ICT price index series are used by economists, industry analysts and the general public to track and comprehend events and trends as they occur in this important area of the ICT sector. Within STC, the series pertaining to consumers are used in the calculation of the Consumer Price Index. In addition, several series are used by the Canadian System of National Accounts in deflating the value of gross investment by government and businesses. This reference document outlines what ICT goods price indexes are produced and their underlying data sources and methodology.

    Release date: 2003-10-30

  • Table: 56-001-X20030037812
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the cable, direct-to-home satellite and wireless cable television industries for the 1999 to 2002 period.

    Release date: 2003-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036658
    Description:

    The expansion of the Canadian television broadcasting industry continued in 2002 with the launch of 47 digital channels. This explosion happened at a time when growth in the advertising market was sluggish, leaving broadcasters fighting for available advertising dollars and struggling to maintain profit margins.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036657
    Description:

    Radio, the oldest electronic medium, is steadily generating profits. Revenues rose 2.7%, reaching over $1.1 billion. The performance of FM stations in recent years is at the root of the sustained level of profits for the radio industry.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036652
    Description:

    Many small businesses and Canadian households are now beginning to embrace broadband technologies. Nearly one-half (48.7%) of Canadian households that regularly use the Internet from home have a broadband connection, while the majority of business enterprises accessing the Internet (58.4%) also use broadband technologies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036653
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way individuals and organizations access, exchange and use information. The Internet puts a wealth of information and entertainment at its users' fingertips, wireless technologies allow communication and information exchange from almost anywhere at any time, and broadband networks pave the way for applications unheard of only a few years ago. This article looks at some of the fundamental changes that have affected the cable industry in the recent past and examines some of the challenges and opportunities it faces in coming years.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036654
    Description:

    Many people in the federal and provincial governments, in universities, hospitals and other organizations are asking the same questions about the commercialization of university research: Is it increasing? What are the benefits? How do universities and regions compare? Statistics Canada's 2001 Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector shows that commercialization activities took a giant leap from 1999 to 2001. This article includes the results for universities only.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036660
    Description:

    The federal science and technology (S&T) community is made up of numerous government departments and agencies with distinct mandates and specializations, all united by their need for skilled, committed, innovative S&T professionals. The new website at www.sciencetech.gc.ca offers a comprehensive view of what they do. Here's where you can learn more about some of the remarkable achievements of Canada's S&T community, and about the exciting scope of its continuing work.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2003010
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the demand for and supply of broadband Internet technologies in Canada. It also examines broadband investment, supply and availability.

    Release date: 2003-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030096579
    Description:

    This paper looks at the surge in demand for people skilled in computer specialties after the rapid growth of the information, communication and technology (ICT) industry in the 1990s. It uses data from the 2001 Census.

    Release date: 2003-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-584-M
    Description:

    Analysts from Statistics Canada and Human Resources Canada are collaborating on a series of studies addressing topics such as an overview on the changing nature of work and the terms of work; the link between the education level of the establishment's workforce and its technology adoption and innovation practices; the effect of foreign competition on the productivity-enhancing behaviour of companies; which firms have high vacancy rates in Canada; a profile of job vacancies in Canada: and the effect of employer characteristics on the gender gap. These reports will be released sequentially throughout 2001.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003045
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals, all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data and provide, or access, services.

    This paper focusses on describing how a leading IT industry, Computer Systems Design and Related Services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. The paper explores structural differences between small and large system design firms and examines data describing industry growth rates, export markets and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003003
    Description:

    This report compares employment growth in information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries across provinces, urban and rural regions and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Table: 88-001-X20030057878
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2001 survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of research and development

    Release date: 2003-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2003002
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which information technology has contributed to Canada's productivity growth, how Canada's productivity performance compared with that of the United State, and the impact of the recent Canadian productivity revival on prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003044
    Description:

    Today, the phrases 'Fierce competition' and 'Internet access provision' are synonymous. The vastly changing Internet-access market is no longer the domain of its original pioneers - the so called 'traditional' Internet service providers (ISPs). As cable firms, telecommunication carriers and, more recently, wireless carriers flood the market, the business challenges facing firms classified to the ISP industry continue to mount.

    Utilizing data from the 2001 Annual Survey of Internet Service Providers and Related Services, this paper examines some of these challenges by exploring various industry characteristics in conjunction with important issues for future growth. The primary focus of this paper revolves is the industry's perception of factors that impede the growth of businesses and highlights the significant distinguishing characteristics among small, medium and large-sized firms. Examination of responses from firms revealed five principal obstacles to growth: 1) competition; 2) cost-related impediments revolving around both ends of the ISP business, their links to consumers and their links to the Internet; 3) delays in obtaining facilities from suppliers; 4) access to financing; and 5) access to markets.

    To provide additional context to the main analysis, the paper also contains background information on the demand and supply side of the Internet-access market, financial performance analysis and structure of the ISP industry.

    Release date: 2003-07-15

  • Table: 56-001-X20030027813
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the private radio industry for the 1999 to 2002 period.

    Release date: 2003-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026572
    Description:

    This table is an assembly of some of the most important statistics on the new economy.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026568
    Description:

    As evident by its contribution of $58.7 billion to Canada's GDP and accounting for more than 7% of business sector GDP, the ICT sector is playing an increasingly greater role in the Canadian economy. The computer and telecommunications sector represents a significant sub-set of the ICT sector and accounts for 3.9% of total economy employment. Discover highlights of a recent Statistics Canada analytical report profiling employment in computer and telecommunications industries.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

Data (6)

Data (6) (6 of 6 results)

Analysis (30)

Analysis (30) (25 of 30 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20030036710
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data, and provide or access services.

    This paper describes how a leading IT industry, including computer systems design and related services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. Structural differences between small and large system design firms are explored and data describing industry growth rates, export markets, and employment characteristics are examined.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200311113104
    Description:

    This paper looks at the high-tech sector in 2002, a year after high-profile layoffs were made in response to the collapse in demand for its products and services.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036658
    Description:

    The expansion of the Canadian television broadcasting industry continued in 2002 with the launch of 47 digital channels. This explosion happened at a time when growth in the advertising market was sluggish, leaving broadcasters fighting for available advertising dollars and struggling to maintain profit margins.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036657
    Description:

    Radio, the oldest electronic medium, is steadily generating profits. Revenues rose 2.7%, reaching over $1.1 billion. The performance of FM stations in recent years is at the root of the sustained level of profits for the radio industry.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036652
    Description:

    Many small businesses and Canadian households are now beginning to embrace broadband technologies. Nearly one-half (48.7%) of Canadian households that regularly use the Internet from home have a broadband connection, while the majority of business enterprises accessing the Internet (58.4%) also use broadband technologies.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036653
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way individuals and organizations access, exchange and use information. The Internet puts a wealth of information and entertainment at its users' fingertips, wireless technologies allow communication and information exchange from almost anywhere at any time, and broadband networks pave the way for applications unheard of only a few years ago. This article looks at some of the fundamental changes that have affected the cable industry in the recent past and examines some of the challenges and opportunities it faces in coming years.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036654
    Description:

    Many people in the federal and provincial governments, in universities, hospitals and other organizations are asking the same questions about the commercialization of university research: Is it increasing? What are the benefits? How do universities and regions compare? Statistics Canada's 2001 Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector shows that commercialization activities took a giant leap from 1999 to 2001. This article includes the results for universities only.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036660
    Description:

    The federal science and technology (S&T) community is made up of numerous government departments and agencies with distinct mandates and specializations, all united by their need for skilled, committed, innovative S&T professionals. The new website at www.sciencetech.gc.ca offers a comprehensive view of what they do. Here's where you can learn more about some of the remarkable achievements of Canada's S&T community, and about the exciting scope of its continuing work.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2003010
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the demand for and supply of broadband Internet technologies in Canada. It also examines broadband investment, supply and availability.

    Release date: 2003-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030096579
    Description:

    This paper looks at the surge in demand for people skilled in computer specialties after the rapid growth of the information, communication and technology (ICT) industry in the 1990s. It uses data from the 2001 Census.

    Release date: 2003-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-584-M
    Description:

    Analysts from Statistics Canada and Human Resources Canada are collaborating on a series of studies addressing topics such as an overview on the changing nature of work and the terms of work; the link between the education level of the establishment's workforce and its technology adoption and innovation practices; the effect of foreign competition on the productivity-enhancing behaviour of companies; which firms have high vacancy rates in Canada; a profile of job vacancies in Canada: and the effect of employer characteristics on the gender gap. These reports will be released sequentially throughout 2001.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003045
    Description:

    The need for Information Technology (IT) support has never been greater than it is today. Businesses, institutions, government and individuals, all rely heavily on IT networks to convey information, process data and provide, or access, services.

    This paper focusses on describing how a leading IT industry, Computer Systems Design and Related Services, has responded to the mounting demand for IT services in Canada. The paper explores structural differences between small and large system design firms and examines data describing industry growth rates, export markets and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-09-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003003
    Description:

    This report compares employment growth in information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries across provinces, urban and rural regions and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2003002
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which information technology has contributed to Canada's productivity growth, how Canada's productivity performance compared with that of the United State, and the impact of the recent Canadian productivity revival on prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2003044
    Description:

    Today, the phrases 'Fierce competition' and 'Internet access provision' are synonymous. The vastly changing Internet-access market is no longer the domain of its original pioneers - the so called 'traditional' Internet service providers (ISPs). As cable firms, telecommunication carriers and, more recently, wireless carriers flood the market, the business challenges facing firms classified to the ISP industry continue to mount.

    Utilizing data from the 2001 Annual Survey of Internet Service Providers and Related Services, this paper examines some of these challenges by exploring various industry characteristics in conjunction with important issues for future growth. The primary focus of this paper revolves is the industry's perception of factors that impede the growth of businesses and highlights the significant distinguishing characteristics among small, medium and large-sized firms. Examination of responses from firms revealed five principal obstacles to growth: 1) competition; 2) cost-related impediments revolving around both ends of the ISP business, their links to consumers and their links to the Internet; 3) delays in obtaining facilities from suppliers; 4) access to financing; and 5) access to markets.

    To provide additional context to the main analysis, the paper also contains background information on the demand and supply side of the Internet-access market, financial performance analysis and structure of the ISP industry.

    Release date: 2003-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026572
    Description:

    This table is an assembly of some of the most important statistics on the new economy.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026568
    Description:

    As evident by its contribution of $58.7 billion to Canada's GDP and accounting for more than 7% of business sector GDP, the ICT sector is playing an increasingly greater role in the Canadian economy. The computer and telecommunications sector represents a significant sub-set of the ICT sector and accounts for 3.9% of total economy employment. Discover highlights of a recent Statistics Canada analytical report profiling employment in computer and telecommunications industries.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026569
    Description:

    What do government and business have in common? A quick look at the results from Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology seems to show that there are no many common characteristics. But dig a bit deeper and we start to see the similarities between larger public and private organizations and the degrees to which they adopt ICTs.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-597-X
    Description:

    This paper provides a descriptive analysis of issues related to the access and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) among Canadian youth. In particular, this research examines the extent to which inequities in the use and access of ICT exist among Canadian high school students, based on gender, socio-economic status and rural-urban location. Three datasets have been used to study this issue: the Canadian portion of the Second International Technology in Education Study (SITES), an international survey which measures schools' use of technological resources; the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), which was conducted in conjunction with the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); and Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS), which focusses specifically on issues related to ICT access and use.The results of these analyses suggest that there is a 'digital divide' among Canadian youth, in terms of access to and experience with ICT. Rural youth are less likely to have access to computers in the home; however, frequency of use and perceived competency levels are not compromised by this trend. Female youth and those from families with low levels of parental education are also less likely to have access to computers in their homes. These groups tend to spend less time on the computer and report lower levels of computer skills competency.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016530
    Description:

    This study looks at Canadian 15-year-old students' use of information and communication technologies at home and at school.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003012
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of industrial structure in the Canadian food processing sector and its relationship to technological change. It uses 1998 special survey data on advanced technology use, plant characteristics and plant performance.

    Release date: 2003-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20020046523
    Description:

    This short article examines the computer systems design and related services in Canada in 2001. Data examined come from the Annual Survey of Software Development and Computer Services. Factors stalling the growth of this formerly rapidly expanding industry are discussed.

    Release date: 2003-05-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003001
    Description:

    This report focusses on new studies that analyse information and communications technology industries, science-based industries, high-technology industries and firms, the knowledge-based economy, and knowledge workers.

    Release date: 2003-05-15

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Technical products: 62-014-X
    Description:

    The growth in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector has created a need for more sector-specific economic indicators. Prices Division at Statistics Canada (STC) currently produces price indexes for several ICT goods that include computers and computer equipment or peripherals (e.g., printers and monitors). These indexes measure the price movement of ICT goods at the final or end-purchaser level (i.e., government, businesses and households) for consumption. The ICT price index series are used by economists, industry analysts and the general public to track and comprehend events and trends as they occur in this important area of the ICT sector. Within STC, the series pertaining to consumers are used in the calculation of the Consumer Price Index. In addition, several series are used by the Canadian System of National Accounts in deflating the value of gross investment by government and businesses. This reference document outlines what ICT goods price indexes are produced and their underlying data sources and methodology.

    Release date: 2003-10-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002017
    Description:

    This paper is an exploratory study to help us identify and characterize innovation practices in Canada's dynamic service industries. It uses logistical estimates to demonstrate that innovation in the services sector is not homogeneous. For each type of innovation 'product, process or both. there is a different business strategy. Small firms do more product innovation, and clients, along with fairs and exhibitions, appear to be the primary sources of information.

    Product innovation is generally done by technical services industries. Process innovation does not seem to favour any particular sector but, understandably, the factors that have the most impact on this type of innovation are company flexibility and information from patent literature, consulting firms and internal management. The most complex strategy-for both product and process innovation-is associated with large firms in the communications and finance sub-sectors. This type of innovation has a larger number of significant factors than the other two types. Finally, this paper shows that there are differences among the forms of innovation and that these differences apply within individual sub-sectors.

    Release date: 2003-01-15

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002016
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed the manufacturing field and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries.

    This is part of a series of working papers based on the Survey of Innovation 1999. Previous working papers include an examination of national estimates of innovation in manufacturing and statistical tables of provincial estimates of innovation in manufacturing.

    This document includes a description of survey methodology, as well as statistical tables for manufacturing industries at the national level for all non write-in questions from the Survey of Innovation 1999 questionnaire.

    Tables present survey results on the following subjects: competitive environment; firm success factors; percentage of innovative firms; unsuccessful or not yet completed innovation projects; activities linked to innovation; sources of information; objectives; problems and obstacles; impact; cooperative and collaborative arrangements; most important innovation; building and construction products; natural resource products; research and development; intellectual property; human resources; andgovernment support programs.

    Release date: 2003-01-13

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