Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039533
    Description:

    Over the past decade, Internet content has evolved to the point where it now represents a significant source of information and entertainment for many people. The Internet has changed the way that many individuals and organizations gather information, and has undoubtedly had some influence on their use of traditional media. While few Canadians had Internet access and went online to gather news information in the mid-1990's, today many use the Internet to access online newspapers, reports, discussion forums and even blogs. In 2005 for example, about 62% of home Internet users - or 38% of Canadian adults overall - went online to view news or sports information (Statistics Canada 2006).

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039535
    Description:

    Over the past six years, the Government of Canada has worked toward providing services online for corporations, clients and citizens alike. By 2005, the initiative had resulted in 130 of the most commonly used services being available online to complement more traditional means of delivery. This article provides highlights from Statistics Canada's 2005 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) which investigated federal and provincial government online services.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039531
    Description:

    Canadian universities and affiliated research hospitals have made great strides in commercializing inventions. Since 1998 Statistics Canada has conducted the Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector to track progress in this area. This article highlights some of the changes between 2003 and 2004, as well as presenting the 2004 regional results.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006048
    Description:

    This study analyzes drug sales by type of retailer between 1998 and 2005. The analysis focuses on the competition between pharmacies, food stores and general merchandise stores. Retail sales of drugs in Canada are also compared with those of the United States. The main source of data is the Quarterly Retail Commodity Survey.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006013
    Description:

    This study aims to develop a better understanding of the social impacts associated with Internet use in Canada. Although much work has been accomplished on the penetration and use of the Internet, this study uses data from the General Social Survey, Cycle 19: Time Use to better understand how personal use of the Internet fits in the day-to-day lives of Canadians.

    The survey provides a time-diary account of respondent activities over a 24-hour period, enabling detailed comparisons among heavy Internet users, moderate users, and non-Internet users and their time allocation decisions. Heavy Internet users spent more time alone during the diary day than non-Internet users, even when compared to people of the same social and demographic background. Although they spent less time with family and friends, many heavy Internet users participated in online activities involving social interaction, such as email or chatting with others.

    Release date: 2006-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029241
    Description:

    For the first time in 2005, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) collected information on the use and development of open-source software. The use of open-source software is a movement that has attracted significant momentum in recent years as public organizations, private firms and governments alike have explored possible benefits.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029245
    Description:

    We are often asked what we have learned from working with clients, exchanging ideas with counterparts in other countries, in talking to our respondents and conducting surveys. This is the first of what we hope is an annual article highlighting in more detail some of the insights we have gained from our work.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019107
    Description:

    Some technological innovations are more apparent than others; the introduction of digital satellite television and wireless cable was one of the most obvious.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019098
    Description:

    This article examines age and how relates to patterns of computer and Internet use. While age is often connected with the likelihood that someone will own or have access to computers and the Internet, age also bears strong relationships to behavior and participation in online activities, much as it does with activities in life in general.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019108
    Description:

    Just as the cable industry was poised to realize the full extent of investments made in its networks by offering local telephony in a number of Canadian markets, it seems to have put an end to the erosion of its traditional customer base. This may be a sign that the industry is reaping the benefits of a customer loyalty strategy founded on product and technological innovation.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006049
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060018804
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

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