Statistics by subject – Information and communications technology

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  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2014001
    Description:

    This infographic describes some results for the Digital Technology and Internet Use survey of 2013. It measures the use and adoption of various digital technologies, including the Internet. The survey focuses on the use of information and communications technologies, including personal computers, mobile devices, and the Internet, using a sample of Canadian enterprises in the private sector. The survey also provides indicators of e-commerce and website use.

    Release date: 2014-11-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005033
    Description:

    In 2004, e-commerce sales were $26.5 billion for private firms in Canada. The paper focuses on the strength of business-to-business sales that accounted for 75% of this total. In particular, the trends in three sectors - wholesale trade, manufacturing and retail trade - are examined. Data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology is used in the analysis.

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004016
    Description:

    This paper examines the differences in adoption of information and communication technologies by firms with high-speed Internet connections compared with those with low-speed connections. The paper analyses data from the 2003 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology.

    Release date: 2004-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004009
    Description:

    This paper examines the adoption of information and communication technology (ICT) in small and large firms and the technology gaps that exist between them. It covers the period from 1999 to 2002 and uses the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology.

    Initially, incorporating ICT into a business was a challenge for many small firms because of the cost of the infrastructure and the inability to quickly adjust their business plans accordingly. More recently however, small firms in Canada have managed to close the technology gap between themselves and large firms regarding basic technologies such as personal computers, e-mail and Internet use.

    Small firms continue to lag behind large firms in regard to implementing more complex technologies such as websites, intranets, extranets and online sales systems. The new challenge for small firms will be closing these technology gaps.

    Release date: 2004-02-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-508-X
    Description:

    This volume is Statistics Canada's second compendium publication on the subject of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Canada. It builds on the material provided in our first compendium publication, Networked Canada: Beyond the information highway, as well as the ongoing Connectedness Series. It also goes one step further by representing a comprehensive compilation of measurements and analyses from diverse areas across the Agency. It traces the evolution of our economy and highlights many facets of our society's transformation.

    Part 1 offers a profile of Canada's ICT sector, including key indicators of change. Changes occurring in individual industries that supply ICT goods and services are also analysed.

    Part 2 addresses economy-wide issues (including health, education and justice) from a sectoral approach, covering ICT diffusion and utilization among business, households and governments.

    Part 3 offers a collection of thematic analyses focussing on topical issues of the Information Society. These include the high-tech labour market, information technology (IT) occupations, the digital divide, telecommunications services, broadband use and deployment, and the use of ICTs by cultural industries.

    Part 4 examines Canada's international involvement in the Information Society. Contributions from policy departments offer an account of the Canadian role in promoting a global Information Society, with particular emphasis on assistance to developing countries.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2003010
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the demand for and supply of broadband Internet technologies in Canada. It also examines broadband investment, supply and availability.

    Release date: 2003-09-23

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2002006
    Description:

    This paper examines the relationship between e-business and firm size.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2001005
    Description:

    This paper looks at the types of businesses that engage in Internet commerce and how these businesses use their information and communications technologies (ICTs).

    Release date: 2001-10-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-504-X
    Description:

    Networked Canada is the first comprehensive compendium to be published by Statistics Canada on the information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The compendium has been designed as a profile of the information society, focusing on current trends, as well as an historical overview of the growth and development of the Canadian ICT sector industries. The publication contains two main parts. The first provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and R&D expenditure. A summary of international ICT sector comparisons for selected variables, using recent data published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is also included here. The ever widening use of, and access to ICTs in the home, at work, in schools and by governments is examined in the second part.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-04-27

Reference (6)

Reference (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2010004
    Description:

    It is widely acknowledged that information and communications technologies (ICTs) have led to major innovations in business models and play an important role in firms' competitiveness and productivity.

    Because of the lack of statistics, however, there have been few Canadian studies of the deployment of electronic business (e-business) processes within firms. E-commerce was one of the first online activities to attract attention, and we now know a little more about it, yet e-commerce is just one of the many business processes supported by Internet-based business networks. In Canada, very little information is available about how ICTs are used to manage operating processes such as the logistics functions of delivery and inventory management and the marketing and client relations functions.

    In 2007, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology collected data for the first time on the deployment of Internet-based systems to manage various e-business processes. The Survey also asked firms about the internal and external integration of the systems that manage those e-business processes.

    Based on these new data, the study begins with a description of e-business adoption in Canada and then explores the benefits that firms see in doing business over the Internet. This study provides a clearer picture of how Canadian firms are deploying e-business processes, broken down by industry, size and type of e-business use.

    Release date: 2010-07-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2000004
    Description:

    Businesses have embraced the use of information and communications technologies such as e-mail, and the Internet and the personal computer or PC are widely used in most businesses. Use of computers among enterprises was high at 81.9%. The Internet, originally designed as a communications medium for researchers, is now being adopted by many other groups. The Internet was used by 52.8% of enterprises and these enterprises accounted for three-quarters of economic activity.

    The proportion of enterprises with Web sites was 21.7% and these enterprises account for 44.8% of economic activity for the private sector. Among other uses, the Internet was used to purchase goods and services by 13.8% of enterprises and by 10.1% to sell goods and services. Significant variation exists in the levels of information and communications technologies use across industries.

    The public sector is a model user of information and communications technologies. The proportion of institutions in public health, education, and federal and provincial governments using the Internet and e-mail, and having Internet Web sites is significantly higher than it is for the private sector. Over 95 % of institutions in the public sector use the Internet, 96.6% use e-mail and 69.2% have an Internet Web site.

    The volume of Internet-based sales reported was $4.4 billion, of which $4.2 billion was for the private sector and $200 million for the public sector. Total private sector Internet based sales accounted for 0.2% of economic activity in terms of total operating revenue.

    For non-Internet users the most important reason for not using the Internet to purchase or sell goods or services was the belief that their goods or services do not lend themselves to concluding transactions over the Internet. Among Internet users, the most popular reason given for not using the Internet to purchase or sell was that they prefer to maintain their current business model.

    Release date: 2000-11-10

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