Statistics by subject – International trade

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All (11)

All (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Table: 65-508-X2007001
    Description:

    This issue provides a snapshot of the past ten years of Canada's trade with China. Canadian exports and imports have increased at a steady pace since 1996, reaching record highs for each by the end of 2005. Overall, Canada recorded a trade deficit with China of $22.4 billion in 2005.

    Release date: 2007-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007064
    Description:

    The evolution in international trade by the ICT sector, particularly in commercial services, is examined by type of service, industry, major trading partners and affiliation of the companies involved.

    Release date: 2007-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701110382
    Description:

    Exports to China in 2007 have risen faster than imports, reflecting its voracious appetite for resources. This has helped reduce Canada's dependence on US markets.

    Release date: 2007-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2007017
    Description:

    This paper empirically investigates how the Canadian economy has evolved following the rise in commodity prices and appreciation of the Canadian dollar that began in 2003. The adjustment in the manufacturing industry has garnered the greatest attention because it has borne the brunt of job losses. However, the adjustment of the manufacturing industry has not been straightforward. Rather, a complex reallocation has been taking place within manufacturing that has been predominantly due to the integration of emerging nations into the global economy. The increased commodity prices and falling manufactured prices caused by this integration have affected durable and non-durable manufacturing industries differently. Non-durable manufacturers have tended to see their competitiveness eroded and their output has tended to fall. Durable manufacturers, on the other hand, have increased output in response to the resource boom and increased demand in general. The result has been stable manufacturing output overall, accompanied by a re-orientation of manufacturing output away from non-durables and toward durables.

    The appreciated dollar and higher commodity prices have also led to a more widespread industrial reallocation in Canada. The higher commodity prices have started a resource boom, particularly in Alberta. The boom has led to rising resource industry employment, while manufacturing employment declined, and to rising service-sector employment. It has contributed to inter-provincial migration, and has greatly increased the purchasing power of Canadian incomes as terms of trade have improved.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700810305
    Description:

    The restructuring of the economy since 2003 has been driven by the surge in commodity prices resulting from the integration of China into the world economy. Labour and capital have shifted to the resource sector, notably in western Canada. Despite the rising exchange rate and lower prices manufacturers overall have maintained output while cutting jobs.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007046
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of import and export price changes on economic welfare in Canada, and in each of the provinces. It examines how terms of trade shifts and fluctuations in the ratio of traded to non-traded goods prices affect the purchasing power of domestic production. Terms of trade shifts are shown to have a larger impact in the short-run. Moreover, the paper shows that failing to account for terms of trade shifts, when analysing macroeconomic data, can lead to misinterpretations about the sources of growth or decline in consumption, investment and imports. The magnitude and direction of terms of trade fluctuations, and their impacts, vary by province and over time. Changes in commodity prices are shown to have important effects. The effect of terms of trade shifts is largest in Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador, while Manitoba is relatively unaffected.

    Release date: 2007-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007044
    Description:

    Utilizing a longitudinal micro data file of manufacturing plants (1974 to 1999), this study tests the effect of higher levels of trade on the level of industrial specialization experienced by regional manufacturing economies. Consistent with trade driven by comparative advantage, the analysis demonstrates that higher levels of export intensity (exports as a share of output) across regions are associated with greater industrial specialization. However, the analysis also shows that changes in export intensity are only weakly associated with changes in specialization. This occurs because comparative advantage tends to shift away from industries that account for a large share of regional manufacturing employment and towards industries that initially have lower shares. This ebb and flow of comparative advantage helps to explain why Canadian manufacturing regions have not become more specialized in an environment of increasing integration into the world market.

    Release date: 2007-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007300
    Description:

    In this study, we assemble a wide variety of data sets in an attempt to produce a set of stylized facts regarding offshoring and the evolution of Canadian employment in recent years. Our main finding is that, in almost all of the data sets used, there is, so far, little evidence of a correlation between offshoring, however defined, and the evolution of employment and layoff rates. While our analyses are fairly simple, they all suggest that if foreign outsourcing has had an impact on Canadian employment and worker displacement so far, this impact is likely to be modest and thus, unlikely to be detected either with industry-level or occupation-level data.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007054
    Description:

    This study examines new motor vehicle sales in 2006. It looks at the evolution of sales in the last 15 years with respect to the origin of the vehicle (North American-built or overseas-built). It also offers analysis of sales of cars and trucks by province in 2006 together with a summary of the number of dealers.

    Release date: 2007-04-23

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 65-508-X2007001
    Description:

    This issue provides a snapshot of the past ten years of Canada's trade with China. Canadian exports and imports have increased at a steady pace since 1996, reaching record highs for each by the end of 2005. Overall, Canada recorded a trade deficit with China of $22.4 billion in 2005.

    Release date: 2007-12-14

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007064
    Description:

    The evolution in international trade by the ICT sector, particularly in commercial services, is examined by type of service, industry, major trading partners and affiliation of the companies involved.

    Release date: 2007-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701110382
    Description:

    Exports to China in 2007 have risen faster than imports, reflecting its voracious appetite for resources. This has helped reduce Canada's dependence on US markets.

    Release date: 2007-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2007017
    Description:

    This paper empirically investigates how the Canadian economy has evolved following the rise in commodity prices and appreciation of the Canadian dollar that began in 2003. The adjustment in the manufacturing industry has garnered the greatest attention because it has borne the brunt of job losses. However, the adjustment of the manufacturing industry has not been straightforward. Rather, a complex reallocation has been taking place within manufacturing that has been predominantly due to the integration of emerging nations into the global economy. The increased commodity prices and falling manufactured prices caused by this integration have affected durable and non-durable manufacturing industries differently. Non-durable manufacturers have tended to see their competitiveness eroded and their output has tended to fall. Durable manufacturers, on the other hand, have increased output in response to the resource boom and increased demand in general. The result has been stable manufacturing output overall, accompanied by a re-orientation of manufacturing output away from non-durables and toward durables.

    The appreciated dollar and higher commodity prices have also led to a more widespread industrial reallocation in Canada. The higher commodity prices have started a resource boom, particularly in Alberta. The boom has led to rising resource industry employment, while manufacturing employment declined, and to rising service-sector employment. It has contributed to inter-provincial migration, and has greatly increased the purchasing power of Canadian incomes as terms of trade have improved.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700810305
    Description:

    The restructuring of the economy since 2003 has been driven by the surge in commodity prices resulting from the integration of China into the world economy. Labour and capital have shifted to the resource sector, notably in western Canada. Despite the rising exchange rate and lower prices manufacturers overall have maintained output while cutting jobs.

    Release date: 2007-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007046
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of import and export price changes on economic welfare in Canada, and in each of the provinces. It examines how terms of trade shifts and fluctuations in the ratio of traded to non-traded goods prices affect the purchasing power of domestic production. Terms of trade shifts are shown to have a larger impact in the short-run. Moreover, the paper shows that failing to account for terms of trade shifts, when analysing macroeconomic data, can lead to misinterpretations about the sources of growth or decline in consumption, investment and imports. The magnitude and direction of terms of trade fluctuations, and their impacts, vary by province and over time. Changes in commodity prices are shown to have important effects. The effect of terms of trade shifts is largest in Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador, while Manitoba is relatively unaffected.

    Release date: 2007-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007044
    Description:

    Utilizing a longitudinal micro data file of manufacturing plants (1974 to 1999), this study tests the effect of higher levels of trade on the level of industrial specialization experienced by regional manufacturing economies. Consistent with trade driven by comparative advantage, the analysis demonstrates that higher levels of export intensity (exports as a share of output) across regions are associated with greater industrial specialization. However, the analysis also shows that changes in export intensity are only weakly associated with changes in specialization. This occurs because comparative advantage tends to shift away from industries that account for a large share of regional manufacturing employment and towards industries that initially have lower shares. This ebb and flow of comparative advantage helps to explain why Canadian manufacturing regions have not become more specialized in an environment of increasing integration into the world market.

    Release date: 2007-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007300
    Description:

    In this study, we assemble a wide variety of data sets in an attempt to produce a set of stylized facts regarding offshoring and the evolution of Canadian employment in recent years. Our main finding is that, in almost all of the data sets used, there is, so far, little evidence of a correlation between offshoring, however defined, and the evolution of employment and layoff rates. While our analyses are fairly simple, they all suggest that if foreign outsourcing has had an impact on Canadian employment and worker displacement so far, this impact is likely to be modest and thus, unlikely to be detected either with industry-level or occupation-level data.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007054
    Description:

    This study examines new motor vehicle sales in 2006. It looks at the evolution of sales in the last 15 years with respect to the origin of the vehicle (North American-built or overseas-built). It also offers analysis of sales of cars and trucks by province in 2006 together with a summary of the number of dealers.

    Release date: 2007-04-23

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