Statistics by subject – International trade

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  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Table: 65-507-M2010009
    Description:

    This issue presents importer statistics from 2002 to 2007 including the number of importers, the value of their imports by industry, importer size, origin and province of residence. The data in this issue are at the establishment level and are derived from the Importer Register Database.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Table: 65-507-M2010008
    Description:

    This issue presents exporter statistics from 1993 to 2007 including the number of exporters, the value of their domestic exports by industry, exporter size, destination and province of residence as well as employment statistics of exporting establishments for the year 2007. The data in this issue are at the establishment level and are derived from the Exporter Register Database.

    Release date: 2010-01-27

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  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

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