Statistics by subject – Globalization and the labour market

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (31)

All (31) (25 of 31 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-07

  • Table: 13-609-X
    Description:

    This product illustrates the nature and the extent of Canada's economic and financial relationship with the world using interactive graphs and tables. The statistical information is presented by theme such as trade, investment, employment and travel.

    Release date: 2017-07-07

  • Table: 13-609-X2017001
    Description:

    This product gathers information from various statistical programs and illustrates the nature and the extent of Canada's economic and financial relationship with the United States using interactive graphics and tables. The statistical information is presented according to four main topics: trade, investment, employment and travel. Key indicators are available for each of the topics, including merchandise trade by Canadian provinces and US states. Users can link to more detailed data as well as information regarding definitions, concepts and methods.

    Release date: 2017-07-07

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014090
    Description:

    The paper examines whether the integration of Canadian manufacturing firms into a global value chain (GVC) improves their productivity. To control for the self-selection effect (more productive firms self-select to join a GVC), propensity-score matching and difference-in-difference methods are used. Becoming part of a GVC can enhance firms' productivity, both immediately and over time. The magnitude and timing of the effects vary by industrial sector, internationalization process, and import source/export destination country in a way that suggests the most substantial advantages of GVC participation are derived from technological improvements.

    Release date: 2014-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013258
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine whether offshorable service-sector occupations and other comparable occupations have displayed similar wage growth since the late 1990s. The analysis allows results to vary across service-sector occupations and worker characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007300
    Description:

    In this study, we assemble a wide variety of data sets in an attempt to produce a set of stylized facts regarding offshoring and the evolution of Canadian employment in recent years. Our main finding is that, in almost all of the data sets used, there is, so far, little evidence of a correlation between offshoring, however defined, and the evolution of employment and layoff rates. While our analyses are fairly simple, they all suggest that if foreign outsourcing has had an impact on Canadian employment and worker displacement so far, this impact is likely to be modest and thus, unlikely to be detected either with industry-level or occupation-level data.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006012
    Description:

    In recent years, cities have become increasingly interested in their ability to generate, attract and retain human capital. One measure of human capital is employment in science- and engineering-based occupations. This paper provides a comparison of the employment shares of these specialized occupations across Canadian and U.S. cities by using data from the Canadian and the U.S. censuses from 1980-1981 and 2000-2001. The paper, therefore, provides a perspective on how Canadian cities performed relative to their U.S. counterparts over a twenty-year period. It also seeks to evaluate how cities of different sizes have performed, because large cities may be advantaged over smaller cities in terms of factors influencing both the demand for, and supply of, scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005035
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) and of foreign outsourcing on the demand for skilled workers. One of the defining features of the Canadian economy in the last two decades has been an increasing wage gap between more- and less-skilled workers. Over the same period, there have been dramatic increases in expenditures on information and communication technologies and in purchases of foreign intermediate inputs. Using data for 84 Canadian manufacturing industries over the 1981-1996 period, we find that both ICT and foreign outsourcing are important contributors to the demand for skills.

    Release date: 2005-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005259
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Tariff Reduction and Employment in Canadian Manufacturing, 1988-1994. At the end of the 1980s, Canada and the United States reached an agreement to phase out import tariffs over a 10-year period beginning January 1st, 1989. This tariff reduction scheme was a major centre-piece of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The implementation of the FTA was followed by a recession, characterized by massive job cuts in manufacturing industries, which led to suggestions that employment losses were related to the reduction of trade barriers. Research on firm output and survival (Gu, Sawchuk and Whewell, 2003; Baggs, 2004) suggests the impact of tariff changes was different across industries and across firms within industries. Using firm-level data, this study investigates the impact of reduced Canadian and U.S. tariffs on Canadian manufacturing employment. The study also asks whether the impact was heterogeneous across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005258
    Description:

    This paper uses firm-level data from the T2/LEAP to investigate whether the link between tariff changes and employment differed across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics over the period 1988 to 1994. The results suggest that the combined effect of domestic and U.S. tariff reductions on employment was typically small, but that losses were significantly larger for firms which were less productive. For instance, firms with average productivity in 1988 responded to tariff changes by cutting employment by only 3.6% over the period 1988 to 1994, while lower productivity firms typically shed 15.1% of their workforce over the same period. This paper also indicates that firms which were more heavily in debt downsized more in response to declining domestic tariffs, suggesting that financial constrains became more binding when tariff cuts were implemented. These results suggest that firms with high productivity and low leverage were less likely than others to feel the impact of declining U.S. and domestic tariffs.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005034
    Description:

    This paper examines head office employment in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It focuses on the characteristics that are related to the creation of a head office and the amount of employment in that head office. Among the characteristics investigated are firm size, number of plants, industrial diversity, geographical location, industry and nationality. The paper finds that foreign-owned firms are more likely to create a head office and to create more employment in their head offices than are domestic-controlled firms, after controlling for firm characteristics. It also finds that head office creation and employment levels are associated with a firm's level of complexity (e.g., its size) and how it organises its production geographically.

    Release date: 2005-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004218
    Description:

    This paper examines whether permanent layoff rates have increased in Canada between the 1980s and the 1990s, using data from the Longitudinal Worker File - a 10% random sample of all Canadian employees.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003019
    Description:

    This paper examines the migration of head offices to other countries from 1999 to 2002. It uses data from Statistics Canada's Business Register.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030086616
    Description:

    This paper examines the influence of the expansion of the unincorporated self-employed on growth in labour productivity in the business sector and compares Canadian and U.S. experiences over the 1987 to 1998 reference period.

    Release date: 2003-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2003002
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which information technology has contributed to Canada's productivity growth, how Canada's productivity performance compared with that of the United State, and the impact of the recent Canadian productivity revival on prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030016390
    Description:

    This paper examines the differences between the Canadian and American economies and labour markets during 2001.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002162
    Description:

    Using data from the 1976-1999 Canadian Labour Force Survey, we examine the stability of currently held jobs in a manner similar to Diebold, Neumark and Polsky (1997) and Neumark, Polsky and Hansen (1999) who analyzed data from the U.S. Current Population Survey. We find that although the current distribution of in-progress job tenures is filling up with more long jobs, and more shorter jobs - suggesting a polarization of job tenure, the stability of currently held jobs has remained quite stable over the period. A closer look reveals two phases in the Canadian data. The period 1977 to 1993 was characterized by declining job stability. Examining the data by current job tenure, we see a declining stability of short jobs - those less than one year in length were less likely to last one more year in at the end of the 1980s (and beginning of the 1990s) than in the late 1970s. At the same time jobs between one and two years long tended to become more stable - becoming more likely to last one more year by 1993. The second phase - 1993-1999 - was characterized by a reversal of these trends such that by the end of the period, jobs of all lengths were equally as stable as in the late 1970s. Declines across the 1980s in job stability were concentrated in low education, older and younger groups but job stability grew most for these same groups in the 1990s.

    Following U.S. methods allows us to undertake an international comparison. We find that while job stability changes were similar in the two countries between 1987 and 1991, job stability rose relative to the United States between 1991 and 1995. We speculate that this difference is due to a relatively deeper recession in Canada in the early 1990s, and a relatively slow recovery in the mid 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001021
    Description:

    This paper examines some of the fundamental issues behind foreign affiliate trade statistics (FATS), including what they are, who needs them and why they have become so important, and Statistics Canada's plan for collecting FATS.

    Release date: 2001-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001156
    Description:

    Developments in the relative wages of more and less educated workers during the early 1990s are examined using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. Particular attention is paid to the role of international trade in determining the wage differential between workers with post-secondary certification and those without. It is shown that in the absence of the relatively greater growth in the supply of more educated workers, the gap between the wages of more and less educated workers would have increased. After controlling for some of the most likely influences on real wages it is found that international trade has a significant positive impact on the wages of both more and less educated workers. However, the impact on the more highly educated seems to be some four times stronger, roughly the same as the impact of technological change

    Release date: 2001-01-12

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 13-609-X
    Description:

    This product illustrates the nature and the extent of Canada's economic and financial relationship with the world using interactive graphs and tables. The statistical information is presented by theme such as trade, investment, employment and travel.

    Release date: 2017-07-07

  • Table: 13-609-X2017001
    Description:

    This product gathers information from various statistical programs and illustrates the nature and the extent of Canada's economic and financial relationship with the United States using interactive graphics and tables. The statistical information is presented according to four main topics: trade, investment, employment and travel. Key indicators are available for each of the topics, including merchandise trade by Canadian provinces and US states. Users can link to more detailed data as well as information regarding definitions, concepts and methods.

    Release date: 2017-07-07

Analysis (28)

Analysis (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-07

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014090
    Description:

    The paper examines whether the integration of Canadian manufacturing firms into a global value chain (GVC) improves their productivity. To control for the self-selection effect (more productive firms self-select to join a GVC), propensity-score matching and difference-in-difference methods are used. Becoming part of a GVC can enhance firms' productivity, both immediately and over time. The magnitude and timing of the effects vary by industrial sector, internationalization process, and import source/export destination country in a way that suggests the most substantial advantages of GVC participation are derived from technological improvements.

    Release date: 2014-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201011013258
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine whether offshorable service-sector occupations and other comparable occupations have displayed similar wage growth since the late 1990s. The analysis allows results to vary across service-sector occupations and worker characteristics.

    Release date: 2010-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007300
    Description:

    In this study, we assemble a wide variety of data sets in an attempt to produce a set of stylized facts regarding offshoring and the evolution of Canadian employment in recent years. Our main finding is that, in almost all of the data sets used, there is, so far, little evidence of a correlation between offshoring, however defined, and the evolution of employment and layoff rates. While our analyses are fairly simple, they all suggest that if foreign outsourcing has had an impact on Canadian employment and worker displacement so far, this impact is likely to be modest and thus, unlikely to be detected either with industry-level or occupation-level data.

    Release date: 2007-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006012
    Description:

    In recent years, cities have become increasingly interested in their ability to generate, attract and retain human capital. One measure of human capital is employment in science- and engineering-based occupations. This paper provides a comparison of the employment shares of these specialized occupations across Canadian and U.S. cities by using data from the Canadian and the U.S. censuses from 1980-1981 and 2000-2001. The paper, therefore, provides a perspective on how Canadian cities performed relative to their U.S. counterparts over a twenty-year period. It also seeks to evaluate how cities of different sizes have performed, because large cities may be advantaged over smaller cities in terms of factors influencing both the demand for, and supply of, scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006273
    Description:

    Recent immigration appears to be characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. The return to host country settlement costs may be very low for some immigrants. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of whether recent international migration is more like internal migration and not a once-for-all move with a possible return should the move prove to have been a mistake. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address the issues raised by the new migration. The results show that a large fraction of immigrants, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

    Release date: 2006-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005035
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) and of foreign outsourcing on the demand for skilled workers. One of the defining features of the Canadian economy in the last two decades has been an increasing wage gap between more- and less-skilled workers. Over the same period, there have been dramatic increases in expenditures on information and communication technologies and in purchases of foreign intermediate inputs. Using data for 84 Canadian manufacturing industries over the 1981-1996 period, we find that both ICT and foreign outsourcing are important contributors to the demand for skills.

    Release date: 2005-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005259
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Tariff Reduction and Employment in Canadian Manufacturing, 1988-1994. At the end of the 1980s, Canada and the United States reached an agreement to phase out import tariffs over a 10-year period beginning January 1st, 1989. This tariff reduction scheme was a major centre-piece of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The implementation of the FTA was followed by a recession, characterized by massive job cuts in manufacturing industries, which led to suggestions that employment losses were related to the reduction of trade barriers. Research on firm output and survival (Gu, Sawchuk and Whewell, 2003; Baggs, 2004) suggests the impact of tariff changes was different across industries and across firms within industries. Using firm-level data, this study investigates the impact of reduced Canadian and U.S. tariffs on Canadian manufacturing employment. The study also asks whether the impact was heterogeneous across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005258
    Description:

    This paper uses firm-level data from the T2/LEAP to investigate whether the link between tariff changes and employment differed across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics over the period 1988 to 1994. The results suggest that the combined effect of domestic and U.S. tariff reductions on employment was typically small, but that losses were significantly larger for firms which were less productive. For instance, firms with average productivity in 1988 responded to tariff changes by cutting employment by only 3.6% over the period 1988 to 1994, while lower productivity firms typically shed 15.1% of their workforce over the same period. This paper also indicates that firms which were more heavily in debt downsized more in response to declining domestic tariffs, suggesting that financial constrains became more binding when tariff cuts were implemented. These results suggest that firms with high productivity and low leverage were less likely than others to feel the impact of declining U.S. and domestic tariffs.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005034
    Description:

    This paper examines head office employment in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It focuses on the characteristics that are related to the creation of a head office and the amount of employment in that head office. Among the characteristics investigated are firm size, number of plants, industrial diversity, geographical location, industry and nationality. The paper finds that foreign-owned firms are more likely to create a head office and to create more employment in their head offices than are domestic-controlled firms, after controlling for firm characteristics. It also finds that head office creation and employment levels are associated with a firm's level of complexity (e.g., its size) and how it organises its production geographically.

    Release date: 2005-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004218
    Description:

    This paper examines whether permanent layoff rates have increased in Canada between the 1980s and the 1990s, using data from the Longitudinal Worker File - a 10% random sample of all Canadian employees.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003019
    Description:

    This paper examines the migration of head offices to other countries from 1999 to 2002. It uses data from Statistics Canada's Business Register.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030086616
    Description:

    This paper examines the influence of the expansion of the unincorporated self-employed on growth in labour productivity in the business sector and compares Canadian and U.S. experiences over the 1987 to 1998 reference period.

    Release date: 2003-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2003002
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which information technology has contributed to Canada's productivity growth, how Canada's productivity performance compared with that of the United State, and the impact of the recent Canadian productivity revival on prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030016390
    Description:

    This paper examines the differences between the Canadian and American economies and labour markets during 2001.

    Release date: 2003-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002162
    Description:

    Using data from the 1976-1999 Canadian Labour Force Survey, we examine the stability of currently held jobs in a manner similar to Diebold, Neumark and Polsky (1997) and Neumark, Polsky and Hansen (1999) who analyzed data from the U.S. Current Population Survey. We find that although the current distribution of in-progress job tenures is filling up with more long jobs, and more shorter jobs - suggesting a polarization of job tenure, the stability of currently held jobs has remained quite stable over the period. A closer look reveals two phases in the Canadian data. The period 1977 to 1993 was characterized by declining job stability. Examining the data by current job tenure, we see a declining stability of short jobs - those less than one year in length were less likely to last one more year in at the end of the 1980s (and beginning of the 1990s) than in the late 1970s. At the same time jobs between one and two years long tended to become more stable - becoming more likely to last one more year by 1993. The second phase - 1993-1999 - was characterized by a reversal of these trends such that by the end of the period, jobs of all lengths were equally as stable as in the late 1970s. Declines across the 1980s in job stability were concentrated in low education, older and younger groups but job stability grew most for these same groups in the 1990s.

    Following U.S. methods allows us to undertake an international comparison. We find that while job stability changes were similar in the two countries between 1987 and 1991, job stability rose relative to the United States between 1991 and 1995. We speculate that this difference is due to a relatively deeper recession in Canada in the early 1990s, and a relatively slow recovery in the mid 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 67F0001M2001021
    Description:

    This paper examines some of the fundamental issues behind foreign affiliate trade statistics (FATS), including what they are, who needs them and why they have become so important, and Statistics Canada's plan for collecting FATS.

    Release date: 2001-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001156
    Description:

    Developments in the relative wages of more and less educated workers during the early 1990s are examined using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics. Particular attention is paid to the role of international trade in determining the wage differential between workers with post-secondary certification and those without. It is shown that in the absence of the relatively greater growth in the supply of more educated workers, the gap between the wages of more and less educated workers would have increased. After controlling for some of the most likely influences on real wages it is found that international trade has a significant positive impact on the wages of both more and less educated workers. However, the impact on the more highly educated seems to be some four times stronger, roughly the same as the impact of technological change

    Release date: 2001-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998126
    Description:

    Controlling for observable worker attributes, we find that computer use is associated with a wage premium of at most 14%. Following Dinardo and Pischke (1997), we examine the wage premium associated with other tools used on the job. While these authors find a significant wage premium for the use of pencils or for sitting down while working, we find a substantial and robust wage premium for the use of a fax machine. Using a variety of reasonable specifications of wage equations including both a computer use indicator and a fax use indicator, we consistently find a stronger effect for fax machines than for computers. Along with Dinardo and Pischke (1997), we argue that workers who use computers earn more than other employees not because of their computing skills per se, but rather because they have more other unobserved skills - innate or learned through school - than other employees.

    Release date: 1998-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998116
    Description:

    The increase in earnings inequality among men in particular in Canada has been well documented. This paper adds to our knowledge of inequality trends by addressing three issues. First, what has happened to earnings inequality among the employed population in the 1990s? We find that earnings inequality and polarization increased little in the population of all workers (men and women combined) between the mid-1980s and mid-1990s. The second question relates to the impact of the changing propensity of Canadians to hold a job on earnings inequality. Put another way, if we focus on the entire population of working age Canadians (those with and without paid employment), what are the inequality trends. We find that earnings inequality among the working age population changed little over the 1980s and 1990s. This analysis incorporates both the influence of the changing employment/population ratio and inequality trends among employed workers on overall earnings inequality among the working age population. But this relative stability in overall earnings inequality since the mid-1980s masks a number of offsetting underlying trends. Some groups of workers are making earnings gains (notably older workers, and women) while others are losing (notably younger workers and men). This paper focuses in particular on the earnings trends among younger workers, and finds that the decline in annual earnings of younger male workers in particular is associated with a decline in real hourly wages.

    Release date: 1998-06-29

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: