Statistics by subject – Job training and educational attainment

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114824
    Description:

    In this paper, multiple sources of data are used to study the profile and labour market outcomes of young men and women aged 25 to 34 without a high school diploma. The data sources include the Labour Force Survey (LFS), the Canadian Income Survey (CIS) and the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD).

    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114655
    Description:

    Based on a self-reported measure of overqualification, this article examines the association between overqualification and skills among workers aged 25 to 64 with a university degree, using data from the 2012 Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). This article also examines the extent to which overqualified workers are dissatisfied with their jobs. Overqualified workers are defined in this study as university-educated workers who reported that they were in a job requiring no more than a high school education.

    Release date: 2016-09-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016374
    Description:

    During the 1990s and 2000s, changes in immigration selection policies significantly altered the characteristics of new immigrants to Canada across a number of dimensions, including educational attainment at landing, immigration class, source region, pre-landing Canadian work experience and geographic distribution. These changes were designed primarily to improve immigrant economic outcomes at landing. This paper examines whether immigrant entry earnings improved as a result of these changes in immigration selection and, if so, which characteristics contributed most to the improvement.

    Release date: 2016-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015033
    Description:

    The video is geared toward individuals selected to participate in the National Apprenticeship Survey. The goal is to encourage them to participate in the survey, by emphasizing how their participation can have a positive impact on apprenticeship programs in Canada, and by highlighting the contributions that people working in the trades make to Canadian society.

    Release date: 2015-08-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-11-04

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014360
    Description:

    This study examines which factors underlie the narrowing of wage differences seen between young bachelor’s degree holders and high school graduates from the 2000-to-2002 period to the 2010-to-2012 period and the widening of differences in full-time paid employment rates between these two groups.

    Four types of factors are considered: those associated with changes in labour supply, labour demand, institutions and employer–employee contracts, and general economic conditions.

    Changes in the population of bachelor’s degree holders relative to the population of high school graduates are used to capture changes in relative labour supply.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111874
    Description:

    Women represent the majority of young university graduates, but are still underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences (STEM) fields. This article provides more information on women with STEM university degrees, and examines whether mathematical abilities in high school are related to gender differences in STEM university programs.

    Release date: 2013-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2013001
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) is a national survey on the social and economic conditions of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit aged 6 years and over. The 2012 APS represents the fourth cycle of the survey and focuses on issues of education, employment and health.

    The article "The Education and Employment Experiences of First Nations People Living Off Reserve, Inuit, and Métis: Selected Findings from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey" describes education pathways, education experiences and current employment of adults aged 18 to 44 who were not attending high school at the time of data collection. It includes analyses of personal, family and school-related experiences during the last year of school, postsecondary education profiles and selected characteristics of workers, the unemployed and those not in the labour force. As well, the article addresses the subject of barriers to further education or training.

    Release date: 2013-11-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012345
    Description:

    This study uses the 2007 National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) to compare hourly wage differences observed between apprentices who complete their programs and apprentices who discontinue their programs. The primary objective is to estimate the magnitude of the wage difference between these groups while taking into account a broad range of characteristics. Furthermore, wage comparisons are refined further by disaggregating apprentices into four mutually exclusive groups, defined on the basis of program completion and certification.

    Release date: 2012-10-03

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111542
    Description:

    This chapter examines different education-related indicators. We begin with a general profile of women's educational attainment, followed by the evolution of their situation in time compared to that of men. We then present more detailed data on the different stages of education, from elementary and high school through to university.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011094
    Description:

    Unlike the waves of immigrants who arrived in the 1950s and 1960s, those arriving in Canada since the 1970s have possessed relatively high educational levels, making an enormous contribution to the pool of individuals in Canada with postsecondary qualifications. Upon their arrival however, many immigrants initially face difficulties finding employment related to their field of study as well as finding jobs that pay relatively high wages.

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population, the report presents a profile of internationally-educated paid workers and focus on the different characteristics and determinants more closely associated with an easier integration in the Canadian labour market: How likely are they to be working in their field of study or in an equivalent occupation? What is their likelihood of having employment earnings at or above the median level of earnings associated with the occupation corresponding best to their field of study?

    Different aspects are taken into account when examining these labour market outcomes. These include the time elapsed since landing, region of education, type of credential, as well as diverse socio-demographic characteristics such as sex, age group, marital status, presence of children, province, territory and area of residence, language ability, and visible minority status. Results for internationally-educated immigrant paid workers are compared to their counterparts with a postsecondary credential earned in Canada and to the Canadian-born paid workers with a postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2011-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100311538
    Description:

    This article examines trends in registered apprenticeship training in Canada over the 1991 to 2009 period, using information from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS). Though data are available for all 22 major trade groups, this article focuses on the top four in terms of total number of apprentices in 2009: electricians, carpenters, automotive service technicians, and plumbers, pipefitters and steamfitters. The analysis first looks at trends in the total number of apprenticeship registrations for each of these four major trade groups and then discusses trends in new registrations, completions and discontinuations.

    Release date: 2011-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011093
    Description:

    This report uses data from the 2006 Census of Population to examine the extent to which the location completion of highest postsecondary diploma/degree completion affects the relative labour market success of immigrants to in Canada. Using descriptive and multivariate techniques, different immigrant cohorts are compared to the Canadian-born with respect to labour force status, earnings and the match between occupation and required schooling. In line with prior Canadian research, we find that in comparison with the Canadian-born, immigrants, especially very-recent immigrants, are more likely to be out of the labour force and less likely to be paid employees, even after accounting for a set of pertinent variables drawn from prior research. When employed, they are much more likely to be overeducated and less likely to be correctly matched or self-employed. They are also more likely to face an earnings disadvantage in Canada's labour markets. Location of study plays a role. Those who completed their postsecondary education in the United Kingdom, France, the United States or, to some extent in Germany, were much more likely to do well on Canada's labour markets in terms of employment ratios and earnings, regardless of immigration cohort, compared to those who completed their postsecondary studies in any other foreign country, especially China, the Russian Federation, Pakistan or South Korea. This finding leads us to conclude that many prospective employers who use education to assess the potential productivity of prospective labour market participants may perceive the 'outcomes' of the British, American, French and German postsecondary education systems as having components that are more easily transferable to Canada than the 'outcomes' of the Chinese, Russian Federation, Pakistani and South Korean postsecondary education systems. Our results lend support to the idea that many Canadian employers and several other stakeholders (such as regulatory bodies, assessment agencies, etc.) may not value postsecondary educational qualifications from all source regions equally.

    Release date: 2011-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100311539
    Description:

    This study investigates job-related training taken by immigrant employees in Canada. Using the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), it examines the incidence, subject and objectives of, and satisfaction with, job-related training of immigrant and Canadian-born employees. Differences among sub-groups of immigrants are compared, as well as other characteristics related to the incidence of training. Perceptions of barriers to training among immigrants and the Canadian-born are also explored.

    Release date: 2011-08-30

Reference (18)

Reference (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3160
    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. The survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) and Statistics Canada. It is hoped that the findings will contribute to the ongoing dialogue by governments, industry and unions to ensure that the apprenticeship systems in Canada continue to respond to the demands of the 21st Century.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2017001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2015 looks at various factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through previous surveys on apprentices, the last one completed in 2007. The 2015 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Employment and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    A sample of over 28,000 respondents – who had either completed or discontinued an apprenticeship program between 2011 and 2013 – was collected.

    The Canada Overview Report presents a profile of apprentices and their experiences in apprenticeship programs in Canada, including technical training and on-the-job training; challenges and difficulties faced; awareness and use of financial support programs; the certification process, including Red Seal; labour market outcomes and job satisfaction; interprovincial mobility; and attitudes about skilled trades.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2615
    Release date: 2009-02-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008001
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008002
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008003
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008004
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008005
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008006
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008007
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008008
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-598-X2008009
    Description:

    The National Apprenticeship Survey (NAS) 2007 looks at factors affecting the completion, certification and transition of apprentices to the labour market. It builds on the content and experience gained through two previous surveys on apprentices, the first completed in 1989 and 1990 and the second in 1994 and 1995. The 2007 survey was a collaborative effort on the part of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), apprenticeship authorities in each of the provinces and territories, and Statistics Canada. The work was carried out under the guidance of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA). About 30,000 current and former apprentices took part in the survey interview process.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4423
    Release date: 2000-03-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1998004
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

  • Technical products: 75F0002M1996009
    Description:

    In this paper, we examine the predictors of an individual's ability to access occupations offering autonomy and authority in the workplace. This paper uses results from analysis of data from the 1993 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the 1994 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 1997-12-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4500
    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 3852
    Release date: 1995-07-06

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