Statistics by subject – Labour mobility, turnover and work absences

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Analysis (113)

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017076
    Description:

    Despite a long-standing interest in labour mobility among researchers and policy makers, relatively little has been known about the barriers impeding the mobility of unemployed Canadians. Using data from the 2016 General Social Survey, this study informs this discussion. It provides, for the first time in Canada, representative survey-based information on barriers to labour mobility collected directly from unemployed individuals aged 15 to 64 who were not students.

    Release date: 2017-11-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016380
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their job in many industrialized countries (OECD 2013). Faced with job loss, displaced workers may choose to return to school to help them reintegrate into the labour force. Job losses in a given local labour market may also induce workers who have not yet been laid off to pre-emptively enrol in postsecondary (PS) institutions, as a precautionary measure. Combining microdata and grouped data, this study examines these two dimensions of the relationship between layoffs and PS enrolment over the 2001-to-2011 period.

    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016001
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their jobs as firms reduce the size of their workforce in response to growing competition, technological changes, changing trade patterns and numerous other factors. Thousands of workers also start a job with a new employer as new firms enter a product market and existing firms expand or replace employees who recently left. This worker reallocation process across employers is generally seen as contributing to productivity growth and rising living standards. To measure this labour reallocation process, labour market indicators such as hiring rates and layoff rates are needed. In response to growing demand for subprovincial labour market information and taking advantage of unique administrative datasets, Statistics Canada is producing hiring rates and layoff rates by economic region of residence. This document describes the data sources, conceptual and methodological issues, and other matters pertaining to these two indicators.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016060
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents annual estimates of hiring rates and layoff rates for Canada’s 69 economic regions (ERs) for the 2003-to-2013 period. It addresses several questions: (1) To what extent do hiring rates and layoff rates differ across Canada’s ERs? (2) What is the profile of ERs that display relatively low or relatively high layoff rates? (3) To what extent did the 2008/2009 recession affect hiring rates and layoff rates in various ERs? The study uses data from the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) to examine these issues. Attention is restricted to employees who were aged 18 to 64. Employees are defined as individuals with wages and salaries but no self-employment income in a given year. Incorporated self-employed individuals are excluded. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016376
    Description:

    The degree to which workers move across geographic areas in response to emerging employment opportunities or negative labour demand shocks is a key element in the adjustment process of an economy, and its ability to reach a desired allocation of resources.

    This study estimates the causal impact of real after-tax annual wages and salaries on the propensity of young men to migrate to Alberta or to accept jobs in that province while maintaining residence in their home province. To do so, it exploits the cross-provincial variation in earnings growth plausibly induced by increases in world oil prices that occurred during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2016-04-11

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2016001
    Description:

    The 2011 Workplace Survey (WS) was an experimental survey funded by Employment and Social Development Canada. It was the first version of a cross-sectional survey that was to be conducted annually. It was meant to help improve the content and collection tools used for subsequent cycles. The survey covered job vacancies, among other things. According to that survey, there were 392,500 job vacancies in December 2011, representing 2.7% of all filled and unfilled positions in Canada that month. This article presents the results of the WS and examines whether the trends observed in the job vacancies are reflected in selected Labour Force Survey (LFS) indicators. Since the WS was a pilot survey and response rates varied depending on the question, some results cannot be provided.

    Release date: 2016-03-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015047
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents an overview of interprovincial paid employment over the 2002-to-2011 period. Interprovincial workers are individuals who maintain a permanent residence in a given province or territory but work in another. The results are based on Statistics Canada’s Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database and pertain to employees aged 18 or older who earned at least $1,000 in 2002 dollars.

    Release date: 2015-06-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114011
    Description:

    This study uses data from the 2011 National Household Survey to examine the migration patterns of ‘infrastructure tradespersons’ over the period 2006 to 2011. In this study, infrastructure tradespersons are defined as Canadian residents aged 25 to 44 with a certification in trades and whose major field of study was in construction trades, mechanics and repair, precision production, or heavy equipment machinery/crane operation.

    Release date: 2014-06-05

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014360
    Description:

    This study examines which factors underlie the narrowing of wage differences seen between young bachelor’s degree holders and high school graduates from the 2000-to-2002 period to the 2010-to-2012 period and the widening of differences in full-time paid employment rates between these two groups.

    Four types of factors are considered: those associated with changes in labour supply, labour demand, institutions and employer–employee contracts, and general economic conditions.

    Changes in the population of bachelor’s degree holders relative to the population of high school graduates are used to capture changes in relative labour supply.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-04-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014359
    Description:

    This paper examines the long-term labour market premiums associated with completing a college certificate and a bachelor's degree, compared to completing a high school diploma. Several labour market outcomes of individuals are examined with longitudinal data over a 20-year period spanning their mid-30s to their mid-50s.

    With the creation of a new linked file consisting of the 1991 Census of Population and the Longitudinal Worker File (LWF), it is now possible to follow individuals in the labour market for a longer period of time than is feasible with existing survey data. The purpose of this study is to compare labour market outcomes of individuals with different levels of educational attainment over a 20-year period spanning their mid-30s to their mid-50s. Three levels of education are considered, corresponding to the decisions made by students following high school graduation: a high school diploma, a college certificate, and a bachelor's degree. Longitudinal data are used to track total earnings (wages and salaries plus net self-employment income), coverage in an employer-sponsored pension plan, employment, union membership, and permanent and temporary layoffs over the period 1991 to 2010.

    Release date: 2014-02-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014355
    Description:

    This study documents the prevalence and nature of re-employment among workers who left long-term jobs in paid employment at age 50 or older. The analysis is based on a 28-year administrative panel dataset, the Longitudinal Worker File, capitalizing on its large sample size and detailed information on mobility across employers. The study examines the prevalence, time and covariates of re-employment as a paid employee and in unincorporated self-employment; the nature of paid re-employment, including job duration, mobility across industry and firm size; the distribution of average earnings in re-employment compared with the long-term job; and the covariates of low and high relative earnings in re-employment.

    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013032
    Description:

    This article addresses three questions: (1) What were the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over the 20 years from 1991 to 2010? (2) To what extent did initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrow during this period? (3) Which factors were associated with the narrowing of these differences? The data are from the linked Census 1991-Longitudinal Worker File and pertain to real annual wages and salaries and pension coverage of immigrants aged 25 to 34 in 1991 who arrived in Canada from 1985 to 1990 and native-born workers of the same age.

    Release date: 2013-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013352
    Description:

    With the leading edge of the baby boom generation now in their mid-sixties, there is considerable interest in how and when these individuals will retire. To help place this issue in a broader context, this paper provides information on the employment histories of individuals who were aged 33 to 38 in 1983 and aged 60 to 65 in 2010.

    The longest observed duration of employment is used as an organizing framework, with summary measures presented on indicators such as years of employment, job turnover, annual and cumulative earnings, permanent and temporary layoffs, and years of pensionable service. Cohort members are loosely categorized as 'marginally attached workers', 'mobile workers', or 'long-term-job holders' according to their employment characteristics, with about one-tenth, one-quarter, and two-thirds of cohort members in these groups, respectively.

    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-09-19

Reference (22)

Reference (22) (22 of 22 results)

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