Statistics by subject – Non-wage benefits

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Analysis (37)

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2018-01-18

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017009
    Description:

    This document describes the procedures for using linked administrative data sources to estimate paid parental leave rates in Canada and the issues surrounding this use.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013032
    Description:

    This article addresses three questions: (1) What were the employment dynamics of a specific cohort of immigrant and native-born workers over the 20 years from 1991 to 2010? (2) To what extent did initial differences in earnings and pension coverage between the two groups narrow during this period? (3) Which factors were associated with the narrowing of these differences? The data are from the linked Census 1991-Longitudinal Worker File and pertain to real annual wages and salaries and pension coverage of immigrants aged 25 to 34 in 1991 who arrived in Canada from 1985 to 1990 and native-born workers of the same age.

    Release date: 2013-11-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111878
    Description:

    In Canada, unionization rates declined in the 1980s and the 1990s, but remained relatively stable over the 2000s. However, the rates evolved differently across various characteristics, including gender, age groups, provinces, and industries. In this analysis, unionization rates are examined across various characteristics over the last three decades.

    Release date: 2013-11-26

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111862
    Description:

    Absences from work can be expressed in terms of days lost per year, on the basis of Labour Force Survey data. In this In Brief, the new data on work absences for 2012 are introduced, and the differences between private and public sector employees' absences are examined in more detail.

    Release date: 2013-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213243
    Description:

    To compensate for earnings lost by employees on leave, some employers provide parents with a Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB), also known as a top-up. The SUB is a government initiative that employers use as a means of reducing the net earnings loss of their employees on leave. This article examines who is likely to receive a top-up and whether the benefit influences mother's return-to-work behaviour.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 71-606-X2009001
    Description:

    This series of analytical reports provides an overview of the Canadian labour market experiences of immigrants to Canada, based on data from the Labour Force Survey. These reports examine the labour force characteristics of immigrants, by reporting on employment and unemployment at the Canada level, for the provinces and large metropolitan areas. They also provide more detailed analysis by region of birth, as well as in-depth analysis of other specific aspects of the immigrant labour market.

    The first two reports analyzed the 2006 labour market experiences of immigrants. The third report updates many of these characteristics for 2007, including analysis by province, sex, educational attainment and selected age groups. The fourth report analyzed 2007 employment rates for immigrants based on where they obtained their highest postsecondary education. This fifth report analyzed employment quality characteristics of immigrants using 2008 data.

    Release date: 2009-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710113179
    Description:

    By 2017, Aboriginal persons of working age (15 and older) are projected to number close to a million about 3.4% of the working-age population overall. With anticipated labour shortages in many areas, this growing population may constitute an important pool of workers. Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in Western Canada are compared in terms of employment, occupational distribution, and skill level.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006286
    Description:

    We analyze the degree to which Canadian families are covered by private pension plans and document how their savings for retirement (made through contributions to tax-assisted retirement savings programs) have evolved over the last two decades. We find that two-parent families, lone-parent families and other individuals located in the bottom quintile of the earnings distribution are not better prepared for retirement than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. On the other hand, those located in the top quintile are better prepared than their counterparts were in the mid-1980s or the early 1990s. As a result, Canadian families' preparedness for retirement, which was fairly unequal in the mid-1980s, has become even more unequal over the last two decades. This finding has important implications for the future. Recent research has shown that the maturation of the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPPs) has led to a substantial reduction in income inequality among the elderly between the early 1980s and the mid-1990s. In the absence of offsetting trends, the growing inequality in Canadian families preparedness for retirement implies that that the distribution of family income among seniors should become more unequal in the years to come.

    Release date: 2006-09-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005248
    Description:

    We examine the evolution of low-paid work and the position of economically vulnerable families in Canada over the last two decades. Despite substantial growth in workers' educational attainment and experience, the proportion of jobs paying less than $10.00 per hour has remained fairly stable since the early 1980s. However, union coverage in low-paid jobs has dropped, especially for males. The risk of job loss has changed little but the proportion of newly hired employees who hold temporary jobs has increased markedly, thereby indicating important changes in the employer-employee relationship. Despite their rising educational attainment, most low earners (except women aged 25 to 29) have not seen their chances of escaping low earnings improved between the 1980s and the 1990s.

    Of all full-time employees, 5% were low-paid and lived in low income families in 1980 and 2000. In 2000, individuals with no high school diploma, recent immigrants, unattached individuals, lone mothers and persons living alone accounted for fully 71% of all full-time workers in low-paid jobs and in low-income, but only 37% of all full-time workers. While members of these five groups account for the majority of low-paid workers in low-income families, two of these groups have seen their economic position declined significantly: low-educated couples and recent immigrants.

    Release date: 2005-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005249
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from recent research papers in the Business and Labour Market Analysis Division of Statistics Canada, regarding low-paid work and economically vulnerable families. It begins by focusing on the evolution of wages in Canada between 1981 and 2004, and then turns to a close-hand look at low-paid work over these two decades. Next, it asks to what extent low-paid workers live in low income families, before documenting the deteriorating position in the labour marker of low-educated couples and recent immigrants.

    Release date: 2005-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005239
    Description:

    Using hourly wage data from the Labour Force Survey as well as previous household surveys covering the 1981-2004 period, we assess whether the relative importance of low-paid jobs and well-paid jobs has changed over the last two decades. Since it is unclear whether trends in wage levels obtained from all the aforementioned surveys are unbiased, we refrain from making definitive statements regarding the evolution of low-paid and well-paid jobs over the 1981-2004 period. When assessing whether well-paid jobs are disappearing in Canada, we focus our attention on recent trends, i.e. on changes in the fraction of jobs falling in certain (real) wage categories during the 1997-2004 period.

    We find little evidence that the relative importance of well-paid jobs - however defined - has fallen over the last two decades or since the second half of the 1990s. We also find little evidence that the relative importance of low-paid jobs, those paying less than $10.00 per hour, has risen during these two periods. We show, along with numerous previous studies, that the wage gap between young workers and their older counterparts has risen substantially over the last two decades but that the wage gap between university graduates and other workers has shown little change. More important, we show that, within age groups, wages of newly hired male and female employees - those with two years of seniority or less - have fallen substantially relative to those of others. Second, in the private sector, the fraction of new employees employed in temporary jobs has risen substantially, increasing from 11% in 1989 to 21% in 2004. Among employees with one year of seniority or less, the incidence of temporary work rose from 14% in 1989 to 25% in 2004. Third, pension coverage has fallen among men of all ages and among females under 45. Taken together, these findings suggest that Canadian firms (existing or newly-born) have responded to growing competition within industries and from abroad by reducing their wage offers for new employees, by offering temporary jobs to a growing proportion of them and by offering less often pension plans that guarantee defined benefits at the time of retirement.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310913100
    Description:

    This article examines the many dimensions of seasonality in employment to determine the extent to which each contributes to frequent reliance on Employment Insurance (EI) benefits.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20030026491
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the statistics compiled from Human Resources and Development Canada data to determine whether new parents have responded to recent changes to the maternity, parental and adoption benefits available under the Employment Insurance program.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20030026515
    Description:

    This paper looks at benefits offered to employees and how they are correlated with other indicators of 'good' jobs. Some of the benefits examined are employer-sponsored insurance and extended medical and plans.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310313087
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market activity of mothers before and after the 2000 amendment to the Employment Insurance (EI) program. The amendment enables working parents to care for a newborn for a longer period of time, while still ensuring them secure re-entry into the labour market.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

Reference (8)

Reference (8) (8 of 8 results)

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