Statistics by subject – Work transitions and life stages

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  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016027
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series presents a detailed profile of working seniors in Canada. It includes information on the work activity levels, sources of income and occupations of senior men and women. Trends over the past two decades are examined.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016385
    Description:

    This study contributes to the debate about the role of self-employment in helping women improve family–work balance by offering Canadian evidence from a uniquely rich dataset that links individual records from the 2006 Census of Population to records from the 2011 National Household Survey. Unlike most previous studies estimating the determinants of women’s self-employment, the analysis focuses directly on transitions from wage employment to self-employment among new mothers.

    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014355
    Description:

    This study documents the prevalence and nature of re-employment among workers who left long-term jobs in paid employment at age 50 or older. The analysis is based on a 28-year administrative panel dataset, the Longitudinal Worker File, capitalizing on its large sample size and detailed information on mobility across employers. The study examines the prevalence, time and covariates of re-employment as a paid employee and in unincorporated self-employment; the nature of paid re-employment, including job duration, mobility across industry and firm size; the distribution of average earnings in re-employment compared with the long-term job; and the covariates of low and high relative earnings in re-employment.

    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013352
    Description:

    With the leading edge of the baby boom generation now in their mid-sixties, there is considerable interest in how and when these individuals will retire. To help place this issue in a broader context, this paper provides information on the employment histories of individuals who were aged 33 to 38 in 1983 and aged 60 to 65 in 2010.

    The longest observed duration of employment is used as an organizing framework, with summary measures presented on indicators such as years of employment, job turnover, annual and cumulative earnings, permanent and temporary layoffs, and years of pensionable service. Cohort members are loosely categorized as 'marginally attached workers', 'mobile workers', or 'long-term-job holders' according to their employment characteristics, with about one-tenth, one-quarter, and two-thirds of cohort members in these groups, respectively.

    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201200111750
    Description:

    This article provides estimates of the expected working life and post-retirement life-expectancy of workers when they reach 50 years of age. Estimates for various educational attainment categories are also provided, by taking both voluntary and involuntary retirements into account.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012014
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the most recent statistical developments relating to the financial well-being of retirees. This summary is based on selected research done at Statistics Canada on the contribution of income, consumption, and financial wealth to the well-being of older Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111402
    Description:

    This study examines four distinct states of retirement among older Canadians: fully retired; partially retired; previously retired but returned to work; and never retired. Using the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Healthy Aging, it presents the socio-economic characteristics of each group, and discusses their differing work patterns and health.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-646-X
    Description:

    The Survey of Older Workers is sponsored by the Labour Market Policy branch of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The survey is designed to assess the labour market intentions and transitions of older Canadians. The subject matter is intended to identify "factors" that influence the decision to retire or remain working. In this context pensions, general finances, the role of dependents, the nature of work, health considerations etc., will be of primary concern in trying to understand workers' intentions and motivations.

    Release date: 2010-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010613251
    Description:

    This study examines associations between health factors and early exits from the labour market. Using all available cycles of the National Population Health Survey, the likelihood of workers age 40 to 52 in 1994/1995 stopping work in the subsequent 12 years is examined controlling for sociodemographic factors.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Public use microdata: 89M0030X
    Description:

    The Survey of Older Workers (SOW) is a survey that was conducted in October and November of 2008 .The survey was conducted on behalf of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada with the objective to develop a statistical database providing estimates surrounding the issues of work and retirement as perceived by older workers in the 10 provinces. The fundamental objective of the SOW is an attempt to understand the components that are integral in the decision to either continue working or retire. In essence we are trying to obtain a better understanding of factors that are driving the decisions of older workers in regards to working and retirement.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5158
    Release date: 2009-12-02

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (54)

Analysis (54) (25 of 54 results)

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016385
    Description:

    This study contributes to the debate about the role of self-employment in helping women improve family–work balance by offering Canadian evidence from a uniquely rich dataset that links individual records from the 2006 Census of Population to records from the 2011 National Household Survey. Unlike most previous studies estimating the determinants of women’s self-employment, the analysis focuses directly on transitions from wage employment to self-employment among new mothers.

    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014355
    Description:

    This study documents the prevalence and nature of re-employment among workers who left long-term jobs in paid employment at age 50 or older. The analysis is based on a 28-year administrative panel dataset, the Longitudinal Worker File, capitalizing on its large sample size and detailed information on mobility across employers. The study examines the prevalence, time and covariates of re-employment as a paid employee and in unincorporated self-employment; the nature of paid re-employment, including job duration, mobility across industry and firm size; the distribution of average earnings in re-employment compared with the long-term job; and the covariates of low and high relative earnings in re-employment.

    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013352
    Description:

    With the leading edge of the baby boom generation now in their mid-sixties, there is considerable interest in how and when these individuals will retire. To help place this issue in a broader context, this paper provides information on the employment histories of individuals who were aged 33 to 38 in 1983 and aged 60 to 65 in 2010.

    The longest observed duration of employment is used as an organizing framework, with summary measures presented on indicators such as years of employment, job turnover, annual and cumulative earnings, permanent and temporary layoffs, and years of pensionable service. Cohort members are loosely categorized as 'marginally attached workers', 'mobile workers', or 'long-term-job holders' according to their employment characteristics, with about one-tenth, one-quarter, and two-thirds of cohort members in these groups, respectively.

    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201200111750
    Description:

    This article provides estimates of the expected working life and post-retirement life-expectancy of workers when they reach 50 years of age. Estimates for various educational attainment categories are also provided, by taking both voluntary and involuntary retirements into account.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012014
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the most recent statistical developments relating to the financial well-being of retirees. This summary is based on selected research done at Statistics Canada on the contribution of income, consumption, and financial wealth to the well-being of older Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111402
    Description:

    This study examines four distinct states of retirement among older Canadians: fully retired; partially retired; previously retired but returned to work; and never retired. Using the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Healthy Aging, it presents the socio-economic characteristics of each group, and discusses their differing work patterns and health.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-646-X
    Description:

    The Survey of Older Workers is sponsored by the Labour Market Policy branch of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The survey is designed to assess the labour market intentions and transitions of older Canadians. The subject matter is intended to identify "factors" that influence the decision to retire or remain working. In this context pensions, general finances, the role of dependents, the nature of work, health considerations etc., will be of primary concern in trying to understand workers' intentions and motivations.

    Release date: 2010-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010613251
    Description:

    This study examines associations between health factors and early exits from the labour market. Using all available cycles of the National Population Health Survey, the likelihood of workers age 40 to 52 in 1994/1995 stopping work in the subsequent 12 years is examined controlling for sociodemographic factors.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010328
    Description:

    This paper examines the extent to which family income during working years is replaced during the retirement years. It does so by tracking cohorts as they age from their mid-50s to their late 70s, using a taxation-based longitudinal data source that covers 26 years from 1982 to 2007. Earlier work by the same authors examined this question with respect to the 50% of the population with strong labour force attachment during their mid-50s. This paper extends that work to include almost all Canadians (80% to 85% of the population). The adult-equivalent-adjusted family income available to the median Canadian during his or her late 70s is about 80% of that observed when the same person was in his or her mid-50s (a replacement rate of 0.8). Replacement rates in retirement are negatively correlated with income earned around age 55. Median replacement rates are 1.1 among individuals in the bottom income quintile, 0.75 in the middle quintile, and 0.7 in the top quintile. In retirement, public pensions and other transfers more than replace earnings and other income of bottom quintile individuals. However, some individuals have very low replacement rates. For example, 20% of individuals in the middle income quintile had replacement rates below 0.6. More recent cohorts had higher family incomes in retirement than did earlier cohorts as a result of higher earnings and private-pension income.

    Release date: 2010-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110782
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a demographic portrait of justice-related occupations and their evolution between 1991 and 2006. Four groups are analysed in more detail: police officers, private security officers, court workers and correctional service officers. Most of the data analysed are from the 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, and some complementary information from other sources is also used. The evolution of the age structure of these groups is analyzed and compared to the age structure of all Canadian workers. Questions related to the aging and renewal of the workforce are also addressed.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811113219
    Description:

    Retirement is a process rather than a discrete event. Many older workers who start receiving a pension stay in the labour market in some capacity for roughly two to three years before they completely cease employment. And many who quit paid work at one point subsequently return to the labour market, especially in the first year after leaving their career job. For a substantial proportion of older workers, this 'bridge employment appears to be a choice rather than a necessity.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110705
    Description:

    Data from the General Social Survey confirm what most working age Canadians probably already know; that is, they are working longer hours either on the job or at home on unpaid domestic chores. In 2005, for example, people between the ages of 25 and 54, the years when women and men are both most likely to be part of the paid work force and raising families, spent about 9 hours per day on all work activities, including paid and unpaid work. This compared with slightly over 8 hours per day nearly 20 years ago in 1986.

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110553
    Description:

    This article examines trends in the amount of time Canadians sleep. Sleep is important for our health and for our ability to interact and be sociable with others. Comparing groups of people in different job and family situations can help to identify influences, apart from our bodies' physiology, that affect our sleep. The article also investigates the differences in sleep times consistently reported between men and women.

    Release date: 2008-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710813192
    Description:

    For some years now, attention has been focused on the predicted retirement patterns of the baby-boom generation since a wave of early departures could seriously disrupt the labour force. However, recent studies and indicators suggest that baby boomers may not in fact be collectively fleeing employment for 'freedom 55. In 2006, a record proportion of 60 to 64 year-olds were in the labour force (45%) and the retirement age remained steady at 61.5. The article examines labour market trends of the population aged 55 to 64 and the employment characteristics of workers in this age group vis à vis those aged 25 to 54.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

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