Statistics by subject – Workplace organization, innovation, performance

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Analysis (51)

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-603-X
    Description:

    This article presents results from the first Survey of Sexual Misconduct in the Canadian Armed Forces. Namely, the prevalence of general sexualized behaviour in the workplace; discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity; personal experiences of discrimination or sexualized behaviour; the prevalence of sexual assault; and knowledge of policies on sexual misconduct and perceptions of responses to sexual misconduct are examined. Where possible, results are analyzed by sex, environmental command, type of service, age, rank, and number of years of service.

    Release date: 2016-11-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016057
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article addresses the extent to which immigrants contribute to economic growth. For the first time, the business ownership and job-creation activities of immigrants are addressed. A longer, more detailed study is also available.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016375
    Description:

    This paper provides, for the first time, an overview of immigrant business ownership and the associated job creation in Canada. This research is possible because a new dataset has been created in which the immigration status of business owners can be determined. The analysis focuses on two types of businesses: private incorporated businesses and the unincorporated self-employed. Results are presented for immigrants who have entered Canada since 1980 and who were in the country in 2010, hereafter simply referred to as immigrants in Canada. In addition, two entering cohorts of immigrants are tracked to determine the business ownership trajectory during the first 5 to 10 years in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-03-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-622-M
    Description:

    The Canadian Economy in Transition is a series of new analytical reports that investigate the dynamics of industrial change in the Canadian economy. Many of these studies focus on the growth and development of industries that are often described as vanguards of the new economy, such as information and communications technology industries and science-based industries (heavy investors in research and development and human capital). Other studies examine the role that knowledge workers play in Canada's industrial evolution. In addition, future studies will investigate productivity performance in different industrial sectors.

    This new series brings together a coherent set of research reports that provide users with a wide variety of empirical perspectives on the economy's changing industrial structure. These perspectives include the dynamics of productivity, profitability, employment, output, investment, occupational structure and industrial geography.

    Release date: 2015-10-08

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-08-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014038
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the results of a data linkage project that created experimental long-term estimates of firm entry and exit rates for the Canadian business sector. It is part of a series of papers that examines firm dynamics using micro-economic data.

    Release date: 2014-08-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713168
    Description:

    As in Europe and other parts of North America, compensation claims for lost workdays in Canada have generally declined. Although this event is encouraging, the rate of decrease may not be uniform for all age groups, industries or regions. Workplace injuries among young workers aged 15 to 24 are of particular interest in this look at injury claim rates in Ontario and British Columbia.

    Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (Ontario) WorkSafeBC (British Columbia)

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006012
    Description:

    In recent years, cities have become increasingly interested in their ability to generate, attract and retain human capital. One measure of human capital is employment in science- and engineering-based occupations. This paper provides a comparison of the employment shares of these specialized occupations across Canadian and U.S. cities by using data from the Canadian and the U.S. censuses from 1980-1981 and 2000-2001. The paper, therefore, provides a perspective on how Canadian cities performed relative to their U.S. counterparts over a twenty-year period. It also seeks to evaluate how cities of different sizes have performed, because large cities may be advantaged over smaller cities in terms of factors influencing both the demand for, and supply of, scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006011
    Description:

    This paper compares the size and composition of science and engineering employment in Canada and the United States. It examines the share of paid employment and paid earnings accounted for by the science and engineering workforce in both countries. Our tabulations distinguish between a core group and a related group of science and engineering workers. The core group includes computer and information scientists, life and related scientists, physical and related scientists, social and related scientists, and engineers. The related group includes workers in health-related occupations, science and engineering managers, science and engineering technologists and technicians, a residual class of other science and engineering workers, and post-secondary educators in science and engineering fields. We examine the employment and earnings shares of science and engineering workers over the 1980/1981 to 2000/2001 period. Detailed industry comparisons are reported for 2000/2001.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610213158
    Description:

    Employment equity and human rights legislation ensures access to the labour market for those with disabilities. Accommodating them in their job and in the workplace is an important part of the issue. A look at the types and severity of disabilities experienced by those aged 15 to 64 in the labour force, and a comparison of some of their characteristics with the non-disabled population.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006236
    Description:

    In a setting where training or promotion opportunity depend on expected initial ability, the effects of signalling initial skills on wages may last well beyond the period when knowledge of a workers' skill set is fully known. This paper proposes extending recent tests for signalling to better accommodate training differences by using firm-level characteristics and applying these tests to a large sample of MBA and law graduates from different ranked schools.

    Release date: 2006-01-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510713146
    Description:

    Workers who use computers earn more than those who do not. Is this a productivity effect or merely selection (that is, workers selected to use computers are more productive to begin with). After controlling for selection, the average worker enjoys a wage premium of 3.8% upon adopting a computer. This premium, however, obscures important differences by education and occupation. Long-run returns to computer use are over 5% for most workers. Differences between short-run and long-run returns suggest that workers may share training costs through sacrificed wages.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005260
    Description:

    The exploration of newly available administrative data in a number of countries has led to a growing realization that a careful study of the interaction between employer and employee characteristics is needed to fully understand labour market outcomes. The objective of this paper is to develop this theme by examining the design of social policy and its interaction with the labour market. The focus is on the Canadian unemployment insurance (UI) program. This analysis uses administrative data on the universe of employees, firms, and UI recipients in Canada over an 11 year period to examine the operation of UI from the perspective of the firm, paying particular attention to longitudinal issues associated with the pattern and causes of cross-subsidies. The findings show that persistent transfers through UI are present at both industry and firm levels. These cross-subsidies are concentrated among a small fraction of firms. An analysis using firm fixed effect indicates that almost 60 percent of explained variation in persistent cross-subsidies can be attributed to firm effects. Calculations of overall efficiency loss are very sensitive to the degree to which firm level information is used. A full appreciation of how social programs like UI interact with the labour market requires recognition of the characteristics and human resource practices of firms, and might be more fruitfully explored by implicit contract models of unemployment.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2004007
    Description:

    This paper examines the issue of whether investment in information and communication technologies, combined with organizational changes and worker skills, contribute to better performance in Canadian firms.

    Release date: 2004-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004020
    Description:

    This paper investigates how changes in technology use of individual plants in the Canadian manufacturing sector are related to two measures of performance --productivity growth and market-share growth.

    Release date: 2004-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613092
    Description:

    This article provides a look at some of the triggers of workplace stress among employed Canadians. It compares the self-employed and hired employees, full-time and part-time employees, and occupation groups.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310613093
    Description:

    This article describes productivity trends since 1981, the role of different industries and information technology (IT) in the recent acceleration, and the implications for Canada's prosperity.

    Release date: 2003-09-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-584-M
    Description:

    Analysts from Statistics Canada and Human Resources Canada are collaborating on a series of studies addressing topics such as an overview on the changing nature of work and the terms of work; the link between the education level of the establishment's workforce and its technology adoption and innovation practices; the effect of foreign competition on the productivity-enhancing behaviour of companies; which firms have high vacancy rates in Canada; a profile of job vacancies in Canada: and the effect of employer characteristics on the gender gap. These reports will be released sequentially throughout 2001.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2003008
    Description:

    This study investigates the relation between human resource management (HRM) practices, such as using financial (compensation pay) as well as non-financial benefits (employee involvement practices and training) to provide a more stimulating environment for its workers, and the novelty of innovation by Canadian establishments.

    Release date: 2003-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 71-584-M2003007
    Description:

    This study examines whether innovative work practices (such as teamwork, job rotation and profit-sharing) reduce employee turnover in both the manufacturing and services sectors.

    Release date: 2003-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003202
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors underlying firm failure, and compares the failure mechanisms for young firms against those of older organizations. This paper suggests that there are systematic differences between the determinants of firm failure for firms that fail early in life and those that fail after having successfully negotiated the early liabilities of newness and adolescence. Data from 339 Canadian corporate bankruptcies confirm that younger firms fail because of inadequacies in managerial knowledge and financial management abilities. On the other hand, older firms are more likely to fail because of an inability to adapt to environmental change.

    Release date: 2003-08-08

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