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All (20) (20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114324
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada presents a life course perspective of the physical, mental and social health of girls and women in Canada. It is intended to provide a summary of various aspects of women’s health, based on available recent survey and administrative data, as well as findings from published research papers and reports. It begins with a general overview of female health in Canada - with a look at the social determinants of health and the health of women who are immigrants to Canada - followed by four sections that describe female health in childhood, in adolescence, in adulthood, and at older ages. Each of these sections includes information on various health behaviours, disease and chronic conditions, and mental health. Sexual activity and reproduction are also examined, beginning in adolescence.

    Release date: 2016-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111905
    Description:

    The structure of the agriculture industry changed significantly over the last two decades. There are fewer but larger farms contributing to Canadian agriculture production. Since 1991, the average farm area increased, while the number of farm operators decreased. The average age of farm operators also increased.

    Release date: 2014-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030016765
    Description:

    This article examines the rate of potential years of life lost--a measure used to quantify premature mortality in differing health regions. The rate was considerably higher in health regions with large proportions of Aboriginal residents, compared with other health regions. Much of this difference was attributable to injuries in the high-Aboriginal regions; notably, suicides and motor vehicle accidents.

    Release date: 2004-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016353
    Description:

    This article describes changes in income-related differences in mortality in Canada from 1971 to 1996, including trends by specific causes of death.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20010009247
    Description:

    A comparative analysis of recent trends in Canadian and American fertility.The study describes fertility differences between the two countries and explores possible explanations for the higher fertility observed in the United States.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20010009248
    Description:

    The study examines major socio-demographic factors associated with the use of home-care services by elderly people living in private households.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005746
    Description:

    Since the 1950s, life expectancy at age 60 has grown considerably. A woman reaching age 60 in 1951 could expect to live an additional 19 years on average, whereas in 1996, a woman of that age could expect to live an average of 24 years. For men, however, the increase has been less pronounced; their life expectancy increased by just over three years during the same period.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025164
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes in immigration to Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044912
    Description:

    This article describes a group of Canadian postsecondary graduates who relocated to the United States.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004852
    Description:

    Fifteen years ago in this series, A. Romaniuc published a comprehensive study of how fertility in Canada had evolved over the century. It described the phenomenal increase of fertility in the postwar period, resulting in the baby boom. With the largest cohorts ever known in Canada, the baby boomers, by their numbers alone, will have left their mark on Canada's social, economic and political structure throughout their life cycle.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111298
    Description:

    The statistics in this section are mainly from two sources. Series Al-349 are from censuses, or derived from censuses, published by Statistics Canada or its predecessors. Series A350-416 are from the official records of the Department of Employment and Immigration or its predecessors.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031640
    Description:

    Starting in 1991, the participation rate of women has declined and shows no sign of resuming its long-standing upward trend. This note explores the rates of adult women aged 25 to 54 by different characteristics.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011662
    Description:

    Changes in Statistics Canada's annual population estimates, introduced in 1993, have an impact on a wide range of social, economic and demographic indicators. Any indicator that relies on population estimates will be affected by the new figures. This article describes the adjustment and examines its impact on health and vital statistics rates. With rare exceptions, all rates decrease as the denominators are adjusted upward. For example, accident rates, suicide rates, and age-specific fertility rates based on the adjustment population are lower than those previously calculated. The extent of the adjustment, however, depends on the geographic and demographic characteristics of the population at risk. Analysts whose work concentrates on special subgroups for whom the adjustment is particularly great (such as young adult men) may wish to pay closer attention to the new population figures. Although the new rates are lower than before, underlying trends and patterns over time or across subcategories are quite similar. The revised series incorporates estimates of net census undercoverage, and for the first time, includes non-permanent residents. In 1991, net census undercoverage and non-permanent residents together amounted to about one million persons, or 3.6% of the revised Canadian population of 28,120,100.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114324
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada presents a life course perspective of the physical, mental and social health of girls and women in Canada. It is intended to provide a summary of various aspects of women’s health, based on available recent survey and administrative data, as well as findings from published research papers and reports. It begins with a general overview of female health in Canada - with a look at the social determinants of health and the health of women who are immigrants to Canada - followed by four sections that describe female health in childhood, in adolescence, in adulthood, and at older ages. Each of these sections includes information on various health behaviours, disease and chronic conditions, and mental health. Sexual activity and reproduction are also examined, beginning in adolescence.

    Release date: 2016-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111905
    Description:

    The structure of the agriculture industry changed significantly over the last two decades. There are fewer but larger farms contributing to Canadian agriculture production. Since 1991, the average farm area increased, while the number of farm operators decreased. The average age of farm operators also increased.

    Release date: 2014-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20030009188
    Description:

    The visible minority population is growing rapidly in Canada and accounts for an increasing proportion of the birth rate. How do the various visible minority groups in Canada's population differ from one another with respect to fertility? The study shows that fertility is higher for visible minority women as a group than for the rest of the population, that fertility varies appreciably from one visible minority group to another, and that removing the effects of the groups' socio-economic characteristics, including religious denomination, does not eliminate fertility differentials.

    Release date: 2006-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030016765
    Description:

    This article examines the rate of potential years of life lost--a measure used to quantify premature mortality in differing health regions. The rate was considerably higher in health regions with large proportions of Aboriginal residents, compared with other health regions. Much of this difference was attributable to injuries in the high-Aboriginal regions; notably, suicides and motor vehicle accidents.

    Release date: 2004-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20020009227
    Description:

    The first assesses how the fertility of immigrant women evolved between 1976-1981 and 1996-2001. It examines whether the fertility behaviour of immigrant women is tending to converge with that of Canadian-born women, and if so, how rapidly this is occurring for different immigrant groups. It also estimates the fertility of immigrants' children, the second-generation of Canadians.

    Release date: 2003-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20020016353
    Description:

    This article describes changes in income-related differences in mortality in Canada from 1971 to 1996, including trends by specific causes of death.

    Release date: 2002-07-04

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20010009247
    Description:

    A comparative analysis of recent trends in Canadian and American fertility.The study describes fertility differences between the two countries and explores possible explanations for the higher fertility observed in the United States.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20010009248
    Description:

    The study examines major socio-demographic factors associated with the use of home-care services by elderly people living in private households.

    Release date: 2002-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005746
    Description:

    Since the 1950s, life expectancy at age 60 has grown considerably. A woman reaching age 60 in 1951 could expect to live an additional 19 years on average, whereas in 1996, a woman of that age could expect to live an average of 24 years. For men, however, the increase has been less pronounced; their life expectancy increased by just over three years during the same period.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000025164
    Description:

    This article looks at the changes in immigration to Canada during the 20th century.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044912
    Description:

    This article describes a group of Canadian postsecondary graduates who relocated to the United States.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004852
    Description:

    Fifteen years ago in this series, A. Romaniuc published a comprehensive study of how fertility in Canada had evolved over the century. It described the phenomenal increase of fertility in the postwar period, resulting in the baby boom. With the largest cohorts ever known in Canada, the baby boomers, by their numbers alone, will have left their mark on Canada's social, economic and political structure throughout their life cycle.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031640
    Description:

    Starting in 1991, the participation rate of women has declined and shows no sign of resuming its long-standing upward trend. This note explores the rates of adult women aged 25 to 54 by different characteristics.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19950011662
    Description:

    Changes in Statistics Canada's annual population estimates, introduced in 1993, have an impact on a wide range of social, economic and demographic indicators. Any indicator that relies on population estimates will be affected by the new figures. This article describes the adjustment and examines its impact on health and vital statistics rates. With rare exceptions, all rates decrease as the denominators are adjusted upward. For example, accident rates, suicide rates, and age-specific fertility rates based on the adjustment population are lower than those previously calculated. The extent of the adjustment, however, depends on the geographic and demographic characteristics of the population at risk. Analysts whose work concentrates on special subgroups for whom the adjustment is particularly great (such as young adult men) may wish to pay closer attention to the new population figures. Although the new rates are lower than before, underlying trends and patterns over time or across subcategories are quite similar. The revised series incorporates estimates of net census undercoverage, and for the first time, includes non-permanent residents. In 1991, net census undercoverage and non-permanent residents together amounted to about one million persons, or 3.6% of the revised Canadian population of 28,120,100.

    Release date: 1995-07-27

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19940009313
    Description:

    The sandwich generation, middle-aged people caught between growing children and aging parents, has attracted the attention of the media in recent years. The following text restricts itself to the demographic dimension of the sandwich generation, while at the same time not implying that dimension should be separated from the social and political issues underlying the phenomenon, of concern to individuals.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

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