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All (6)

All (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1996002
    Description:

    This paper attempts to rescue a small but nonetheless important segment of the Canadian population from neglect, those classified by the census as long-term residents in collective dwellings. In 1991, 440,000 Canadians belonged to this population, living in nursing homes, correctional institutions, rooming houses and the like. The changing age-sex structure of the Canadian population caused their number to increase between 1971 and 1991, despite the fact that Canadian men and women were less likely at most ages to live in collective dwellings in the latter year.

    Non-census data on several segments of this population are reviewed, especially for people in health-related institutions and in correctional facilities, and reveal that long-term residents are in each case a small fraction of a much larger population with a relatively brief contact with the institution on average. This review concludes that non-census data can provide a useful context for the study of the population in collective dwellings, but that the census is at present the only data source providing a comprehensive overview, despite the limited data collected and the even more limited data published.

    Special tabulations from the 1971, 1981 and 1991 censuses are used to explore its changing size and age-sex structure with particular attention to three of its components, people in health-related institutions, in service collective dwellings and in religious institutions. A significant difference between people in collective dwellings and those in private dwellings is that the former have, whether willingly or unwillingly, left the family circle. Hence, marital status is a key variable, and is used to show the close relationship between the changing marital status of the population, in particular the declining numbers of the never married and the growing numbers of separated, widowed or divorced older women, and structural changes.

    Release date: 1996-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1996001
    Description:

    This paper describes the methodology for fertility projections used in the 1993-based population projections by age and sex for Canada, provinces and territories, 1993-2016. A new version of the parametric model known as the Pearsonian Type III curve was applied for projecting fertility age pattern. The Pearsonian Type III model is considered as an improvement over the Type I used in the past projections. This is because the Type III curve better portrays both the distribution of the age-specific fertility rates and the estimates of births. Since the 1993-based population projections are the first official projections to incorporate the net census undercoverage in the population base, it has been necessary to recalculate fertility rates based on the adjusted population estimates. This recalculation resulted in lowering the historical series of age-specific and total fertility rates, 1971-1993. The three sets of fertility assumptions and projections were developed with these adjusted annual fertility rates.

    It is hoped that this paper will provide valuable information about the technical and analytical aspects of the current fertility projection model. Discussions on the current and future levels and age pattern of fertility in Canada, provinces and territories are also presented in the paper.

    Release date: 1996-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022889
    Description:

    This paper looks at causes, counts and rates of work-related deaths by selected demographic and job characteristics. It also touches briefly on the financial cost of such fatalities.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Table: 91-545-X
    Description:

    This report documents many changes which occurred among youth in official language minorities, from changes in population size and concentration in various parts of the country to changes in bilingualism, language use, education, employment and families.

    Release date: 1996-05-17

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

  • Table: 91-545-X
    Description:

    This report documents many changes which occurred among youth in official language minorities, from changes in population size and concentration in various parts of the country to changes in bilingualism, language use, education, employment and families.

    Release date: 1996-05-17

  • Table: 10F0008X
    Description:

    Two sets of profiles are available; the first (2A) presents the basic data collected from all Canadian households; the second (2B) presents the detailed socio-economic data collected from a 20% sample of households.

    Release date: 1996-04-01

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1996002
    Description:

    This paper attempts to rescue a small but nonetheless important segment of the Canadian population from neglect, those classified by the census as long-term residents in collective dwellings. In 1991, 440,000 Canadians belonged to this population, living in nursing homes, correctional institutions, rooming houses and the like. The changing age-sex structure of the Canadian population caused their number to increase between 1971 and 1991, despite the fact that Canadian men and women were less likely at most ages to live in collective dwellings in the latter year.

    Non-census data on several segments of this population are reviewed, especially for people in health-related institutions and in correctional facilities, and reveal that long-term residents are in each case a small fraction of a much larger population with a relatively brief contact with the institution on average. This review concludes that non-census data can provide a useful context for the study of the population in collective dwellings, but that the census is at present the only data source providing a comprehensive overview, despite the limited data collected and the even more limited data published.

    Special tabulations from the 1971, 1981 and 1991 censuses are used to explore its changing size and age-sex structure with particular attention to three of its components, people in health-related institutions, in service collective dwellings and in religious institutions. A significant difference between people in collective dwellings and those in private dwellings is that the former have, whether willingly or unwillingly, left the family circle. Hence, marital status is a key variable, and is used to show the close relationship between the changing marital status of the population, in particular the declining numbers of the never married and the growing numbers of separated, widowed or divorced older women, and structural changes.

    Release date: 1996-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M1996001
    Description:

    This paper describes the methodology for fertility projections used in the 1993-based population projections by age and sex for Canada, provinces and territories, 1993-2016. A new version of the parametric model known as the Pearsonian Type III curve was applied for projecting fertility age pattern. The Pearsonian Type III model is considered as an improvement over the Type I used in the past projections. This is because the Type III curve better portrays both the distribution of the age-specific fertility rates and the estimates of births. Since the 1993-based population projections are the first official projections to incorporate the net census undercoverage in the population base, it has been necessary to recalculate fertility rates based on the adjusted population estimates. This recalculation resulted in lowering the historical series of age-specific and total fertility rates, 1971-1993. The three sets of fertility assumptions and projections were developed with these adjusted annual fertility rates.

    It is hoped that this paper will provide valuable information about the technical and analytical aspects of the current fertility projection model. Discussions on the current and future levels and age pattern of fertility in Canada, provinces and territories are also presented in the paper.

    Release date: 1996-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960022889
    Description:

    This paper looks at causes, counts and rates of work-related deaths by selected demographic and job characteristics. It also touches briefly on the financial cost of such fatalities.

    Release date: 1996-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19950009311
    Description:

    The 1990 report compared the situation of the Canadian population with that of the United States, Canada's historical partner in the settlement of North America, showing their similarities and differences and how each has developed over time. Continuing in the same vein, the 1993 report described the Mexican situation in comparison with the population of Canada. It seemed worthwhile to consider why and how Canada's two most densely populated provinces, Quebec and Ontario, are alike and differ.

    Release date: 1996-01-19

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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