Statistics by subject – Population and demography

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All (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007452
    Description:

    The report examines income and low income in census metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2000. It examines the situation of families and the neighbourhoods they live in. It also examines the situation of recent immigrants, Aboriginal people and lone-parent family members.

    Median pre-tax income rose in virtually all Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) over the 1980 to 2000 period. Incomes increased at both the top and bottom of the income distribution, but tended to rise faster at the top. In nearly all cities, income increased faster in the higher income neighbourhoods - measured at the census tract (CT) level - than it did in lower income neighbourhoods. The incidence of low income was at similar levels in 1980 and 2000, but the demographic composition of low income changed, reflecting rising low-income rates among some 'at-risk' groups, as well as demographic changes in the CMA. By 2000, recent immigrants comprised more of the low-income population, and a greater share of the residents in low-income neighbourhoods than they did in 1980. Recent immigrants had much higher low-income rates in 2000 than in 1980. In 2000, Aboriginal people and people in single-parent families had much higher low-income rates than others and were over-represented in low-income neighbourhoods. The share of income that low-income families received from government transfers rose over the period. The location of low-income neighbourhoods changed in some CMAs, reflecting a decline in low-income neighbourhoods in the city centre and a rise in low-income neighbourhoods in more suburban areas.

    The report examines before-tax income in CMAs using the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040088407
    Description:

    This report examines homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and metropolitan levels. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides.

    Release date: 2004-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004229
    Description:

    This study examines trends in the internal migration of the Canadian-born and long-term immigrants into and out of Canada's three largest metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2004-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030046978
    Description:

    - Between 1979 and 2001, 599 deaths in Canada were attributed to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), only one of which was related to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), known as "mad cow disease."

    - CJD mortality rates rise with age and are highest among people in their seventies.

    Release date: 2004-07-21

  • Table: 89-597-X
    Description:

    This article presents information on health, education and language for Métis, Inuit and North American Indian children living in non-reserve areas. It uses the 'children and youth' component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

    Release date: 2004-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2004006
    Description:

    The paper assesses and compares new and old methodologies for official estimates of migration within and among provinces and territories for the period 1996/97 to 2000/01.

    Release date: 2004-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040016883
    Description:

    This article looks at rural and urban adult migrants, the distance they move and changes in their economic circumstances before and after moving.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030036850
    Description:

    This article examines which groups have high rates of injury and what activities are most likely to produce injuries.

    Release date: 2004-05-18

  • Table: 95F0313X2001009
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).This table is part of the topic 'Families and household living arrangements,' which presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and family structure. The 2001 Census data also include persons living in families, with relatives and with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into families of married couples and common-law couples (including same-sex couples), and lone-parent families.It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030026807
    Description:

    The pattern of suicide among immigrants is closer to that in their countries of birth than to that of the Canadian-born population. Suicide rates of immigrants are about half those of the Canadian-born. Among immigrants, suicide rates increase with age, but among people born in Canada, rates are highest in middle age.

    Release date: 2004-03-29

  • Table: 97F0017X2001008
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling,' which presents data on school attendance, the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    'School attendance' refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period from September 2000 to May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits toward a certificate, diploma or degree.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0017XIE2001008.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Table: 97F0011X2001056
    Description:

    his table is part of the topic 'Aboriginal Peoples of Canada,' which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey .

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue no. 97F0011XIE2001056.

    Release date: 2004-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2003002
    Description:

    This bulletin assesses the degree of spatial diversity across rural and urban Canada in terms of a number of demographic, social and economic indicators. A multivariate statistical method is used to reduce 27 commonly used and understood indicators to 6 dimensions. These dimensions are used to profile and to map the 288 census divisions (CDs) of Canada. This analysis investigates the nature of these dimensions, their spatial distribution and their relationship with the prevailing regional classifications. These results can help a variety of stakeholders and decision-makers to more fully understand the regional context in which they operate, in comparison with the rest of the country.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004067
    Description:

    This paper assesses the degree of spatial diversity exhibited across Canada by using 1996 Census of Population data, aggregated at the census division (CD) level. The approach taken in this research adopts a broad territorial focus, is exploratory in nature and emphasizes territorial performance in a comparative context.

    The study is based on a range of commonly used and understood demographic, social and economic variables. A factor analysis was conducted in order to identify underlying dimensions that characterize each CD across Canada. The factor analysis resulted in six factors, each of which provides a profile of the CDs on a number of key attributes.

    The research is primarily descriptive and will be of interest to a broad audience. It can be used to facilitate the diffusion of baseline data to a wide range of stakeholders, stimulate discussion on spatial diversity at the subprovincial level and enhance the debate on potential alternative development paths for each region. Note that this research is, in turn, constrained by the nature of the data available. The analysis is also static and focussed on a cross-section. The causes of the observed diversity are not explicitly accounted for in the study.

    Release date: 2004-03-17

  • Table: 97F0024X2001016
    Description:

    These data tables present selected variables from the 2001 Census according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The tables allow the user to perform simple rank and sort functions. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories.

    The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Table: 97F0024X
    Description:

    These tables were released on the official day of release for each of the census topics at various levels of geography. They present information highlights through key indicators, such as 2001 Census counts and percentage distribution. The tables also allow users to perform simple rank and sort functions.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Table: 95F0495X
    Description:

    The profiles are part of the census standard data products, which are data tables extracted from the 2001 Census database. They contain statistical information about all population, household, dwelling and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Table: 95F0495X2001012
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2001 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, visible minority groups, immigration, mother tongue, education, income, work and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Index and guides: 92-384-X
    Description:

    This report provides information on various aspects of the data on mobility and migration. It provides a review of the questions, concepts and definitions, along with a discussion of limitations inherent in the measurement of one-year and five-year mobility and migration in the censuses of Canada. Some background is provided on the processing of mobility data, from collection through to retrieval. The historical comparability of mobility and migration data from 1961 to 2001 is examined in terms of conceptual and processing changes. The analysis of the quality of 2001 data focuses mainly on the quality at the national and provincial level. Where possible, the five-year data and the one-year data are discussed separately.

    Release date: 2004-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20030016765
    Description:

    This article examines the rate of potential years of life lost--a measure used to quantify premature mortality in differing health regions. The rate was considerably higher in health regions with large proportions of Aboriginal residents, compared with other health regions. Much of this difference was attributable to injuries in the high-Aboriginal regions; notably, suicides and motor vehicle accidents.

    Release date: 2004-01-21

  • Table: 95F0495X2001011
    Description:

    This 2001 Census cumulative profile provides variables for Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (2003 Representation Order).

    The profiles are part of the census standard data products, which are data tables extracted from the 2001 Census database. They contain statistical information about all population, household, dwelling and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2004-01-08

Data (10)

Data (10) (10 of 10 results)

Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) (9 of 9 results)

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007452
    Description:

    The report examines income and low income in census metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2000. It examines the situation of families and the neighbourhoods they live in. It also examines the situation of recent immigrants, Aboriginal people and lone-parent family members.

    Median pre-tax income rose in virtually all Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) over the 1980 to 2000 period. Incomes increased at both the top and bottom of the income distribution, but tended to rise faster at the top. In nearly all cities, income increased faster in the higher income neighbourhoods - measured at the census tract (CT) level - than it did in lower income neighbourhoods. The incidence of low income was at similar levels in 1980 and 2000, but the demographic composition of low income changed, reflecting rising low-income rates among some 'at-risk' groups, as well as demographic changes in the CMA. By 2000, recent immigrants comprised more of the low-income population, and a greater share of the residents in low-income neighbourhoods than they did in 1980. Recent immigrants had much higher low-income rates in 2000 than in 1980. In 2000, Aboriginal people and people in single-parent families had much higher low-income rates than others and were over-represented in low-income neighbourhoods. The share of income that low-income families received from government transfers rose over the period. The location of low-income neighbourhoods changed in some CMAs, reflecting a decline in low-income neighbourhoods in the city centre and a rise in low-income neighbourhoods in more suburban areas.

    The report examines before-tax income in CMAs using the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2004067
    Description:

    This paper assesses the degree of spatial diversity exhibited across Canada by using 1996 Census of Population data, aggregated at the census division (CD) level. The approach taken in this research adopts a broad territorial focus, is exploratory in nature and emphasizes territorial performance in a comparative context.

    The study is based on a range of commonly used and understood demographic, social and economic variables. A factor analysis was conducted in order to identify underlying dimensions that characterize each CD across Canada. The factor analysis resulted in six factors, each of which provides a profile of the CDs on a number of key attributes.

    The research is primarily descriptive and will be of interest to a broad audience. It can be used to facilitate the diffusion of baseline data to a wide range of stakeholders, stimulate discussion on spatial diversity at the subprovincial level and enhance the debate on potential alternative development paths for each region. Note that this research is, in turn, constrained by the nature of the data available. The analysis is also static and focussed on a cross-section. The causes of the observed diversity are not explicitly accounted for in the study.

    Release date: 2004-03-17

  • Index and guides: 92-384-X
    Description:

    This report provides information on various aspects of the data on mobility and migration. It provides a review of the questions, concepts and definitions, along with a discussion of limitations inherent in the measurement of one-year and five-year mobility and migration in the censuses of Canada. Some background is provided on the processing of mobility data, from collection through to retrieval. The historical comparability of mobility and migration data from 1961 to 2001 is examined in terms of conceptual and processing changes. The analysis of the quality of 2001 data focuses mainly on the quality at the national and provincial level. Where possible, the five-year data and the one-year data are discussed separately.

    Release date: 2004-01-27

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