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All (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018710
    Description:

    Recent trends in hospitalization and mortality attributable to diseases of the circulatory system

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-580-X
    Description:

    This study examines the rate of death and cancer incidence in Canadian Gulf and Kuwait War military personnel and compares them to those of other Canadian military personnel of the same era and to members of the general population.

    Release date: 2005-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005254
    Description:

    This study examines changes in the geographic concentration of Canada's major immigrant groups, with respect to their initial destination and subsequent redistribution during the past two decades. At the same time, it examines the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in determining immigrants' locational choices. The results show a large rise in concentration levels at the initial destination among major immigrant groups throughout the 1970s and 1980s; this subsided in the following decade. Redistribution after immigration was generally small-scale, and had inconsistent effects on changing concentration at initial destinations among immigrant groups and across arrival cohorts within an immigrant group. Even for immigrant and refugee groups whose initial settlement was strongly influenced by government intervention, redistribution only partly altered general geographic distribution. Finally, this study finds that the size of the pre-existing immigrant community is not a significant factor in immigrant locational choice when location fixed effects are accounted for.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005255
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The Initial Destinations and Redistribution of Canada's Major Immigrant Groups: Changes over the Past Two Decades. In 1981, about 58% of immigrants who had come to Canada in the previous 10 years lived in Toronto, Vancouver, and Montréal; by 2001, this had increased to 74% (Statistics Canada 2003), triggering debate on the merits of a more 'balanced geographic distribution of immigrants' (Citizenship and Immigration Canada-CIC 2001). Policies aimed at directing immigrants away from major gateway cities in many western countries have focused on the choice of initial destination, and little effort has been made to affect subsequent mobility. But such policies will work only if other, non-gateway regions, can keep immigrants or maintain balanced in- and out-migration. To this end, this study examines how Canada's major immigrant groups arriving over the past two decades have altered their geographic concentration through time, comparing immigrants arriving in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, in the concentration levels of their initial destinations, and in their subsequent geographic dispersal. It pays attention to the dispersal pattern of groups whose initial settlements were influenced by government policies and questions the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in geographic distribution.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Table: 91-547-X
    Description:

    This analytical report presents population projections of the Aboriginal groups for Canada, provinces and territories, and for different types of residential areas. The projections cover the 2001 to 2017 period and show the contribution of the Aboriginal groups to the general demographic profile of Canada in 2017, the 150th anniversary of its Confederation. The report includes a description of the model used to produce the projections, assumptions which were developed for the future evolution of fertility, mortality and migration of the Aboriginal groups, and the major conclusions from the analysis of five projection scenarios.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048042
    Description:

    Trends in rates of death involving firearms are examined from 1979 to 2002. Rates of firearms-related suicide, homicide, and unintentional death are reported over time and by province. Recent rates of gun-related death in Canada's four largest cities -Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver and Calgary -are compared.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005008
    Description:

    This report examines the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the Aboriginal population living in 11 metropolitan centres in 1981 and 2001. It studies the size, age and mobility of the population; the family structure of Aboriginal people; school participation and educational attainment; and the labour market characteristics and transfer dependence of Aboriginal people.

    It finds that Aboriginal people living in the nation's largest metropolitan centres were faring better overall in 2001 than they were two decades earlier.

    Nevertheless, these Aboriginal urban dwellers still faced many challenges, especially those in living in urban centres in the western provinces, where large gaps remained with their non-Aboriginal counterparts.

    The report examines the Aboriginal identity population, which refers to those persons who identified with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, North American Indian, Métis or Inuit. The concept of identity allows for historical comparability with the concept used in the 1981 Census to discuss changes over time. Data came from the censuses of 1981, 1996 and 2001, as well as the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    The metropolitan areas examined include Montreal, Ottawa-Hull (now known as Ottawa-Gatineau), Toronto, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.

    Release date: 2005-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2005007
    Description:

    The Population Estimates Program at Statistics Canada is using internal migration estimates derived from administrative sources of data. There are two versions of migration estimates currently available, preliminary (P), based on Child Tax Credit information and final (F), produced using information from income tax reports. For some reference dates they could be significantly different. This paper summarises the research undertaken in Demography Division to modify the current method for preliminary estimates in order to decrease those differences. After a brief analysis of the differences, six methods are tested: 1) regression of out-migration; 2) regression of in- and out-migration separately; 3) regression of net migration; 4) the exponentially weighted moving average; 5) the U.S. Bureau of Census approach; and 6) method of using the first difference regression. It seems that the methods in which final and preliminary migration data are combined to estimate preliminary net migration (Method 3) are the best approach to improve convergence between preliminary and final estimates of internal migration for the Population Estimation Program. This approach allows for "smoothing" of some erratic patterns displayed by the former method while preserving CTB data's ability to capture current shifts in migration patterns.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005003
    Description:

    This study documents the number and characteristics of growing, stable and declining communities and regions between 1981 and 2001 and puts them into a geographical perspective in terms of the degree of rurality.

    Release date: 2005-05-31

  • Table: 94F0048X
    Description:

    These profiles provide a statistical overview of Canada, presenting most of the univariate census variables for various levels of geography. The data for the census variables were collected from a 20% sample of the population, with the exception of the data for the age, sex and marital status variables, which were collected from the total population.

    Release date: 2005-04-26

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-541-X
    Description:

    This report presents the main results of population projections according to some ethnocultural variables (visible minority group, immigrant status, religion, mother tongue) for Canada, provinces and selected metropolitan areas. Based on the January 1st 2001 estimation of the permanent resident population, results of five projection scenarios from a micro-simulation model that take into account differentials in behaviors and intergenerational transfers are presented for the years 2001 to 2017.

    Release date: 2005-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009090
    Description:

    Predictors of death in seniors updates information on the leading cause of death for people aged 65 or older, and examines factors associated with death in seniors over an eight-year period. The analysis focuses on psychosocial factors (psychological distress, financial and family stress) in relation to mortality.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

Data (6)

Data (6) (6 of 6 results)

Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038968
    Description:

    This article uses Statistics Canada's most recent population projections for visible minority groups to draw a picture of the possible ethnocultural composition of the country when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary in 2017. It focuses on a number of issues: How many Canadians might belong to a visible minority group in the near future? How many landed immigrants might there be? What are the predominant visible minority groups likely to be? Is diversity likely to remain concentrated in Canada's major urban centres?

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018709
    Description:

    Estimates of life expectancy in 2002, focusing on male/female differences

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050018710
    Description:

    Recent trends in hospitalization and mortality attributable to diseases of the circulatory system

    Release date: 2005-11-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-580-X
    Description:

    This study examines the rate of death and cancer incidence in Canadian Gulf and Kuwait War military personnel and compares them to those of other Canadian military personnel of the same era and to members of the general population.

    Release date: 2005-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005254
    Description:

    This study examines changes in the geographic concentration of Canada's major immigrant groups, with respect to their initial destination and subsequent redistribution during the past two decades. At the same time, it examines the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in determining immigrants' locational choices. The results show a large rise in concentration levels at the initial destination among major immigrant groups throughout the 1970s and 1980s; this subsided in the following decade. Redistribution after immigration was generally small-scale, and had inconsistent effects on changing concentration at initial destinations among immigrant groups and across arrival cohorts within an immigrant group. Even for immigrant and refugee groups whose initial settlement was strongly influenced by government intervention, redistribution only partly altered general geographic distribution. Finally, this study finds that the size of the pre-existing immigrant community is not a significant factor in immigrant locational choice when location fixed effects are accounted for.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005255
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The Initial Destinations and Redistribution of Canada's Major Immigrant Groups: Changes over the Past Two Decades. In 1981, about 58% of immigrants who had come to Canada in the previous 10 years lived in Toronto, Vancouver, and Montréal; by 2001, this had increased to 74% (Statistics Canada 2003), triggering debate on the merits of a more 'balanced geographic distribution of immigrants' (Citizenship and Immigration Canada-CIC 2001). Policies aimed at directing immigrants away from major gateway cities in many western countries have focused on the choice of initial destination, and little effort has been made to affect subsequent mobility. But such policies will work only if other, non-gateway regions, can keep immigrants or maintain balanced in- and out-migration. To this end, this study examines how Canada's major immigrant groups arriving over the past two decades have altered their geographic concentration through time, comparing immigrants arriving in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, in the concentration levels of their initial destinations, and in their subsequent geographic dispersal. It pays attention to the dispersal pattern of groups whose initial settlements were influenced by government policies and questions the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in geographic distribution.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048042
    Description:

    Trends in rates of death involving firearms are examined from 1979 to 2002. Rates of firearms-related suicide, homicide, and unintentional death are reported over time and by province. Recent rates of gun-related death in Canada's four largest cities -Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver and Calgary -are compared.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005008
    Description:

    This report examines the demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the Aboriginal population living in 11 metropolitan centres in 1981 and 2001. It studies the size, age and mobility of the population; the family structure of Aboriginal people; school participation and educational attainment; and the labour market characteristics and transfer dependence of Aboriginal people.

    It finds that Aboriginal people living in the nation's largest metropolitan centres were faring better overall in 2001 than they were two decades earlier.

    Nevertheless, these Aboriginal urban dwellers still faced many challenges, especially those in living in urban centres in the western provinces, where large gaps remained with their non-Aboriginal counterparts.

    The report examines the Aboriginal identity population, which refers to those persons who identified with at least one Aboriginal group, that is, North American Indian, Métis or Inuit. The concept of identity allows for historical comparability with the concept used in the 1981 Census to discuss changes over time. Data came from the censuses of 1981, 1996 and 2001, as well as the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    The metropolitan areas examined include Montreal, Ottawa-Hull (now known as Ottawa-Gatineau), Toronto, Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.

    Release date: 2005-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2005007
    Description:

    The Population Estimates Program at Statistics Canada is using internal migration estimates derived from administrative sources of data. There are two versions of migration estimates currently available, preliminary (P), based on Child Tax Credit information and final (F), produced using information from income tax reports. For some reference dates they could be significantly different. This paper summarises the research undertaken in Demography Division to modify the current method for preliminary estimates in order to decrease those differences. After a brief analysis of the differences, six methods are tested: 1) regression of out-migration; 2) regression of in- and out-migration separately; 3) regression of net migration; 4) the exponentially weighted moving average; 5) the U.S. Bureau of Census approach; and 6) method of using the first difference regression. It seems that the methods in which final and preliminary migration data are combined to estimate preliminary net migration (Method 3) are the best approach to improve convergence between preliminary and final estimates of internal migration for the Population Estimation Program. This approach allows for "smoothing" of some erratic patterns displayed by the former method while preserving CTB data's ability to capture current shifts in migration patterns.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017033
    Description:

    Delayed marriage, postponement of children, and adults with increasingly long-lived parents have given rise to the 'sandwich generation'. These are individuals caught between the often conflicting demands of caring for children and caring for seniors. Although still relatively small (712,000 in 2002), the ranks of the sandwich generation are likely to grow.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005003
    Description:

    This study documents the number and characteristics of growing, stable and declining communities and regions between 1981 and 2001 and puts them into a geographical perspective in terms of the degree of rurality.

    Release date: 2005-05-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 91-541-X
    Description:

    This report presents the main results of population projections according to some ethnocultural variables (visible minority group, immigrant status, religion, mother tongue) for Canada, provinces and selected metropolitan areas. Based on the January 1st 2001 estimation of the permanent resident population, results of five projection scenarios from a micro-simulation model that take into account differentials in behaviors and intergenerational transfers are presented for the years 2001 to 2017.

    Release date: 2005-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20050009090
    Description:

    Predictors of death in seniors updates information on the leading cause of death for people aged 65 or older, and examines factors associated with death in seniors over an eight-year period. The analysis focuses on psychosocial factors (psychological distress, financial and family stress) in relation to mortality.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

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