Statistics by subject – Prices and price indexes

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (2)

All (2) (2 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980034329
    Description:

    Price inflation for Canadian consumers has thus far been much lower in the 1990s than in the previous two decades. This has especially been the case for the prices of consumer goods. In the 1990-97 period, the price index for consumer goods rose by just 16%. However, the 1990s inflation rate for consumer services was a markedly higher 26%.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M19970103363
    Description:

    The debate over problems in measuring inflation is not new. It has recently been revived by the publication of a report by an Advisory Commission to the U.S. Senate. The Commission, chaired by Michael J. Boskin, found that the U.S. Consumer Price Index (CPI) overestimates inflation by 1.1 percentage points a year. This article shows that the potential bias in the French CPI is on a far lower order of magnitude. It is hard to summarize the changes in a multitude of prices with a single figure. Even in the best-case theoretical scenario - a single consumer faced with a spending decision - the treatment of substitutions between existing products raises important problems. Nevertheless, it is possible to provide a fairly accurate description of the various possible alternatives and the statistical procedures used in France largely shield the country's index from criticism on this point. The introduction of new products creates serious difficulties that have not been entirely resolved in the United States, in France, or elsewhere: "new products" is used here in the broad sense to denote (1) genuinely new products on the market and (2) products already sold elsewhere but introduced in a new sales outlet, replacing existing products or not. The Boskin Commission estimates the upward bias in the U.S. CPI due to new products at 0.6 percentage points per year. The Commission's claim rest on fragile and probably exaggerated estimates. Our conclusion converges with the opinion of several U.S. statisticians.

    Release date: 1997-10-02

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) (2 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980034329
    Description:

    Price inflation for Canadian consumers has thus far been much lower in the 1990s than in the previous two decades. This has especially been the case for the prices of consumer goods. In the 1990-97 period, the price index for consumer goods rose by just 16%. However, the 1990s inflation rate for consumer services was a markedly higher 26%.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M19970103363
    Description:

    The debate over problems in measuring inflation is not new. It has recently been revived by the publication of a report by an Advisory Commission to the U.S. Senate. The Commission, chaired by Michael J. Boskin, found that the U.S. Consumer Price Index (CPI) overestimates inflation by 1.1 percentage points a year. This article shows that the potential bias in the French CPI is on a far lower order of magnitude. It is hard to summarize the changes in a multitude of prices with a single figure. Even in the best-case theoretical scenario - a single consumer faced with a spending decision - the treatment of substitutions between existing products raises important problems. Nevertheless, it is possible to provide a fairly accurate description of the various possible alternatives and the statistical procedures used in France largely shield the country's index from criticism on this point. The introduction of new products creates serious difficulties that have not been entirely resolved in the United States, in France, or elsewhere: "new products" is used here in the broad sense to denote (1) genuinely new products on the market and (2) products already sold elsewhere but introduced in a new sales outlet, replacing existing products or not. The Boskin Commission estimates the upward bias in the U.S. CPI due to new products at 0.6 percentage points per year. The Commission's claim rest on fragile and probably exaggerated estimates. Our conclusion converges with the opinion of several U.S. statisticians.

    Release date: 1997-10-02

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: