Statistics by subject – Prices and price indexes

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006043
    Description:

    The paper examines the pricing behaviour of 81 Canadian manufacturing industries from 1974 to 1996. It explores the domestic and foreign factors that affect price formation in Canada and the circumstances in which Canadian prices respond to foreign (U.S.) influences (the law of one price), as opposed to domestic factors (i.e., labour, energy costs and productivity growth). It finds that: (1) Canadian manufacturing prices are, on average, set using a mixture of a cost mark-up pricing rule and the law-of-one-price rule: both domestic factors (such as input prices and productivity) and foreign factors (such as competing U.S. prices) exert important influences on Canadian prices; (2) Canadian prices are more sensitive to U.S. prices if the industry faces higher import competition and if home and foreign products are less differentiated. Compared to prices of domestic products, prices of imported foreign products are more responsive to foreign prices. However, the price of imports also responds to Canadian prices; though this pricing-to-market phenomenon is reduced as imports increase in importance; (3) Industry differences exist. Domestic prices respond more to productivity changes in industries where competition is more intense and where products are more homogeneous. Imports respond more to domestic factors when they account for a smaller share of the domestic market; (4) As the pressure from foreign markets increases, in a period of an appreciating Canadian dollar, changes in prices are influenced more by fluctuations in foreign prices. In comparison, when the pressure from foreign markets decreases, in a period of a depreciating Canadian dollar, changes in Canadian prices are more responsive to input cost changes at home. Disequilibria that were generated by previous shocks are overcome more quickly during periods when the exchange rate appreciated.

    Release date: 2006-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006041
    Description:

    During the post-1970 period, Canadian manufacturing prices have alternately increased and fallen relative to U.S. prices' just the reverse of the cycle in the Canada' U.S. exchange rate. But not all manufacturing industries have experienced the same amplitude of relative price changes. This paper examines the industry characteristics that are related to the shifts in competitiveness, measured as the relative price ratio between Canadian prices and U.S. prices adjusted by the exchange rate. We find that relative factor input costs and relative productivity growth are the two most important factors influencing changes in relative Canada' U.S. prices. Competitive pressures emanating from trade are important determinants of the extent to which relative productivity differences are passed through to cross-country relative prices in the manufacturing sector. We also find that the magnitude of domestic market competition and export intensity affects the short-run relative price shifts over the cycle of exchange rate.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006042
    Description:

    This survey analyzes the highlights of consumer prices in 2005 focusing on the various components of the Consumer Price Index such as energy, services and durable goods, This study also looks at the provincial dimension and compares Canadian prices to other countries.

    Release date: 2006-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2005018
    Description:

    Since the early 1990s, increased attention has been focused on the possibility that the rate of inflation may be being overstated as a result of measurement biases in the estimation of the Consumer Price Index (CPI). One source of this possible error is caused by outlet substitution bias. This type of distortion can result when consumers shift their patronage from one retail outlet to another. As superstores and warehouse type stores continue to open and capture a larger share of the market, the existing CPI sample could become increasingly unrepresentative. If the prices are lower at the new outlets and this decrease in costs is not accurately captured in the CPI, the index will exhibit an upward bias.

    Release date: 2006-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005007
    Description:

    The objective of this bulletin is to document the trend in the price to move goods, information and people across space.

    Release date: 2006-03-22

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006043
    Description:

    The paper examines the pricing behaviour of 81 Canadian manufacturing industries from 1974 to 1996. It explores the domestic and foreign factors that affect price formation in Canada and the circumstances in which Canadian prices respond to foreign (U.S.) influences (the law of one price), as opposed to domestic factors (i.e., labour, energy costs and productivity growth). It finds that: (1) Canadian manufacturing prices are, on average, set using a mixture of a cost mark-up pricing rule and the law-of-one-price rule: both domestic factors (such as input prices and productivity) and foreign factors (such as competing U.S. prices) exert important influences on Canadian prices; (2) Canadian prices are more sensitive to U.S. prices if the industry faces higher import competition and if home and foreign products are less differentiated. Compared to prices of domestic products, prices of imported foreign products are more responsive to foreign prices. However, the price of imports also responds to Canadian prices; though this pricing-to-market phenomenon is reduced as imports increase in importance; (3) Industry differences exist. Domestic prices respond more to productivity changes in industries where competition is more intense and where products are more homogeneous. Imports respond more to domestic factors when they account for a smaller share of the domestic market; (4) As the pressure from foreign markets increases, in a period of an appreciating Canadian dollar, changes in prices are influenced more by fluctuations in foreign prices. In comparison, when the pressure from foreign markets decreases, in a period of a depreciating Canadian dollar, changes in Canadian prices are more responsive to input cost changes at home. Disequilibria that were generated by previous shocks are overcome more quickly during periods when the exchange rate appreciated.

    Release date: 2006-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006041
    Description:

    During the post-1970 period, Canadian manufacturing prices have alternately increased and fallen relative to U.S. prices' just the reverse of the cycle in the Canada' U.S. exchange rate. But not all manufacturing industries have experienced the same amplitude of relative price changes. This paper examines the industry characteristics that are related to the shifts in competitiveness, measured as the relative price ratio between Canadian prices and U.S. prices adjusted by the exchange rate. We find that relative factor input costs and relative productivity growth are the two most important factors influencing changes in relative Canada' U.S. prices. Competitive pressures emanating from trade are important determinants of the extent to which relative productivity differences are passed through to cross-country relative prices in the manufacturing sector. We also find that the magnitude of domestic market competition and export intensity affects the short-run relative price shifts over the cycle of exchange rate.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006042
    Description:

    This survey analyzes the highlights of consumer prices in 2005 focusing on the various components of the Consumer Price Index such as energy, services and durable goods, This study also looks at the provincial dimension and compares Canadian prices to other countries.

    Release date: 2006-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2005018
    Description:

    Since the early 1990s, increased attention has been focused on the possibility that the rate of inflation may be being overstated as a result of measurement biases in the estimation of the Consumer Price Index (CPI). One source of this possible error is caused by outlet substitution bias. This type of distortion can result when consumers shift their patronage from one retail outlet to another. As superstores and warehouse type stores continue to open and capture a larger share of the market, the existing CPI sample could become increasingly unrepresentative. If the prices are lower at the new outlets and this decrease in costs is not accurately captured in the CPI, the index will exhibit an upward bias.

    Release date: 2006-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005007
    Description:

    The objective of this bulletin is to document the trend in the price to move goods, information and people across space.

    Release date: 2006-03-22

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: