Statistics by subject – Science and technology

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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210742
    Description:

    In its recently released science and technology (S&T) strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage (Government of Canada 2007), the federal government stated its commitment to improving its ability to measure and report on the impact of federal S&T expenditures. In response to this challenge, the Policy Research Initiative (PRI) collaborated with departments and agencies that conduct and fund S&T to explore these issues. This article provides a summary from one of the PRI reports, The Transmission of Technology and Knowledge to Innovative Manufacturing Firms by Publicly Funded Research Organizations.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110595
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked non-innovative manufacturing plants why they did not innovate; that is, why they did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process to the market during the three-year reference period 2002 to 2004. Lack of market demand was the main response. An examination of repondents' other specified reasons shows that some non-innovators may actually be innovative although they do not perceive themselves to be. Innovative and non-innovative plants perceive success factors, such as developing and seeking new markets, in significantly different ways. Non-innovative plants are not expected to be innovative in the near future.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210316
    Description:

    The most recent Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation (2005) distinguished five types of innovation. The questions on types of innovation were redesigned in response to the 1997 revision of the Oslo Manual, which incorporated new insights on innovation in the service industries, and broadened the concept of process innovation to include not only production processes but also methods of product delivery. This article examines the five different types of innovation in Canadian manufacturing establishments and industry groups.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019619
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked innovative manufacturing establishments questions related to how they acquired knowledge and technology for innovation and from whom. This article analyzes the two thirds of manufacturing establishments that were innovative that is they introduced a new or significantly improved product or process during the three reference years, 2002 to 2004 and sheds light on their purchase of knowledge and technology, the importance of information sources, and their collaborative partners.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
    Description:

    Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039539
    Description:

    A program of facilitated access to micro-data is now in place, whereby external researchers are sworn in as 'deemed employees' of Statistics Canada and enter into a contractual arrangement with the department to conduct approved research projects.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029243
    Description:

    Innovative firms cite industry associations as important sources of ideas more frequently than they cite federal government research laboratories or universities according to data from Statistics Canada's 2003 Innovation Survey. We need a better understanding of the contributions and impact of nonprofit innovation enablers such as industry associations, and to achieve that we need to overcome obstacles to identifying them and their contributions in the data. Without this understanding, policy makers may overlook an important class of actual and potential innovation enablers.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019104
    Description:

    This article analyses trends in business intramural research and development expenditures (BERD) in Alberta over the period between 1994 and 2003 using data from Statistics Canada's Research and Development in Canadian Industry (RDCI) Survey. In Alberta, R&D related to oil and gas activities accounts for much of the growth in BERD in the Oil and Gas Extraction, Manufacturing and Services industries. Of particular interest in the growth of R&D in the Scientific Research and Development Services industry which can be considered as an indicator of the growth of start-ups or venture capital based firms.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028020
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 2003 surveyed establishments in 36 services industries with a view to better understand innovation in the service sector. The services industries surveyed included information and communications technology industries (ICT); selected professional, scientific and technical services, selected natural resources industries and selected transportation industries. Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003, which examined innovation in selected service industries, show that establishments in ICT service industries are most likely to be innovative. In Canada, the three industries with the highest rates of innovation were all ICT industries.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037437
    Description:

    This analysis gives some insights into how small firms that have made the transition to medium size are different from the rest of the pack in innovativeness, patent use, confidentiality agreements, and research and development tax credits collaboration. It is based on the 1999 Survey of Innovation.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037430
    Description:

    This article describes the increasing penetration of direct-to-home satellite, wireless and digital cable television technologies.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026928
    Description:

    More information on community innovation is required by policy developers. Data from the 1999 Survey of Innovation reveals that the national estimate of innovative manufacturing establishments is 81%.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036375
    Description:

    A theoretical link between innovation and economic growth has been contemplated since the late 1700s. Professor Ajay Agrawal discusses the significance of knowledge spillovers, the relation to innovation and growth, and the closely related concept of absorptive capacity. Clearly, the immense complexity of the issue of innovation and economic growth has increased scholarly interest in the topic.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016147
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturing firms fall into two groups: The first uses patents and trademarks as a part of successful innovation strategy consisting of regular R&D financed by R&D grants and tax credits introducing world-first innovations. These are usually large firms in the technology-intensive core sector. The second group includes firms of all sizes in all sectors that rely mostly on trade secrets. They typically transfer technology from abroad by introducing Canada-first innovations and rely on government information services more than on R&D grants and tax credits.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035762
    Description:

    The first survey of innovation, advanced technologies and practices in the Canadian construction sector was recently conducted. Of the five types of technologies listed in the survey, communications technologies have the highest percentage of use (46% of businesses). Of all the techonolgies, three computer-related technologies had the highest percentage of use : e-mail (38%), company computer networks (25%) and computer aided design (23%). The three advanced practices with the largest percentage of business using them, each with one third of businesses, are: design-build contracts, computerized inventory control and computerized estimating software.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

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Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210742
    Description:

    In its recently released science and technology (S&T) strategy, Mobilizing Science and Technology to Canada's Advantage (Government of Canada 2007), the federal government stated its commitment to improving its ability to measure and report on the impact of federal S&T expenditures. In response to this challenge, the Policy Research Initiative (PRI) collaborated with departments and agencies that conduct and fund S&T to explore these issues. This article provides a summary from one of the PRI reports, The Transmission of Technology and Knowledge to Innovative Manufacturing Firms by Publicly Funded Research Organizations.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110595
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked non-innovative manufacturing plants why they did not innovate; that is, why they did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process to the market during the three-year reference period 2002 to 2004. Lack of market demand was the main response. An examination of repondents' other specified reasons shows that some non-innovators may actually be innovative although they do not perceive themselves to be. Innovative and non-innovative plants perceive success factors, such as developing and seeking new markets, in significantly different ways. Non-innovative plants are not expected to be innovative in the near future.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210316
    Description:

    The most recent Statistics Canada Survey of Innovation (2005) distinguished five types of innovation. The questions on types of innovation were redesigned in response to the 1997 revision of the Oslo Manual, which incorporated new insights on innovation in the service industries, and broadened the concept of process innovation to include not only production processes but also methods of product delivery. This article examines the five different types of innovation in Canadian manufacturing establishments and industry groups.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019619
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked innovative manufacturing establishments questions related to how they acquired knowledge and technology for innovation and from whom. This article analyzes the two thirds of manufacturing establishments that were innovative that is they introduced a new or significantly improved product or process during the three reference years, 2002 to 2004 and sheds light on their purchase of knowledge and technology, the importance of information sources, and their collaborative partners.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20070019621
    Description:

    Advances in science, medical research and information and communications technologies (ICTs) are bringing about significant economic and societal transformations, the full impacts of which are only beginning to emerge. Canada's ICT sector, comprised of both manufacturing and service industries, e industries, is one of several important players in the strategy towards improving the country's innovation performance. In particular, the ICT service industries are leading the way in terms of economic growth and innovative activity.

    Release date: 2007-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039539
    Description:

    A program of facilitated access to micro-data is now in place, whereby external researchers are sworn in as 'deemed employees' of Statistics Canada and enter into a contractual arrangement with the department to conduct approved research projects.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029243
    Description:

    Innovative firms cite industry associations as important sources of ideas more frequently than they cite federal government research laboratories or universities according to data from Statistics Canada's 2003 Innovation Survey. We need a better understanding of the contributions and impact of nonprofit innovation enablers such as industry associations, and to achieve that we need to overcome obstacles to identifying them and their contributions in the data. Without this understanding, policy makers may overlook an important class of actual and potential innovation enablers.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019104
    Description:

    This article analyses trends in business intramural research and development expenditures (BERD) in Alberta over the period between 1994 and 2003 using data from Statistics Canada's Research and Development in Canadian Industry (RDCI) Survey. In Alberta, R&D related to oil and gas activities accounts for much of the growth in BERD in the Oil and Gas Extraction, Manufacturing and Services industries. Of particular interest in the growth of R&D in the Scientific Research and Development Services industry which can be considered as an indicator of the growth of start-ups or venture capital based firms.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028020
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 2003 surveyed establishments in 36 services industries with a view to better understand innovation in the service sector. The services industries surveyed included information and communications technology industries (ICT); selected professional, scientific and technical services, selected natural resources industries and selected transportation industries. Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003, which examined innovation in selected service industries, show that establishments in ICT service industries are most likely to be innovative. In Canada, the three industries with the highest rates of innovation were all ICT industries.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037437
    Description:

    This analysis gives some insights into how small firms that have made the transition to medium size are different from the rest of the pack in innovativeness, patent use, confidentiality agreements, and research and development tax credits collaboration. It is based on the 1999 Survey of Innovation.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037430
    Description:

    This article describes the increasing penetration of direct-to-home satellite, wireless and digital cable television technologies.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026928
    Description:

    More information on community innovation is required by policy developers. Data from the 1999 Survey of Innovation reveals that the national estimate of innovative manufacturing establishments is 81%.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036375
    Description:

    A theoretical link between innovation and economic growth has been contemplated since the late 1700s. Professor Ajay Agrawal discusses the significance of knowledge spillovers, the relation to innovation and growth, and the closely related concept of absorptive capacity. Clearly, the immense complexity of the issue of innovation and economic growth has increased scholarly interest in the topic.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016147
    Description:

    Canadian manufacturing firms fall into two groups: The first uses patents and trademarks as a part of successful innovation strategy consisting of regular R&D financed by R&D grants and tax credits introducing world-first innovations. These are usually large firms in the technology-intensive core sector. The second group includes firms of all sizes in all sectors that rely mostly on trade secrets. They typically transfer technology from abroad by introducing Canada-first innovations and rely on government information services more than on R&D grants and tax credits.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035762
    Description:

    The first survey of innovation, advanced technologies and practices in the Canadian construction sector was recently conducted. Of the five types of technologies listed in the survey, communications technologies have the highest percentage of use (46% of businesses). Of all the techonolgies, three computer-related technologies had the highest percentage of use : e-mail (38%), company computer networks (25%) and computer aided design (23%). The three advanced practices with the largest percentage of business using them, each with one third of businesses, are: design-build contracts, computerized inventory control and computerized estimating software.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

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