Statistics by subject – Science and technology

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All (21)

All (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900110875
    Description:

    This study is a comparative analysis based on data from the Statistics Canada Bioproducts Development Survey (2003) and the Bioproducts Development and Production Survey 2006. This study examines the current state of the domestic industry, changes occurring over the period, and implications for agriculture.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110580
    Description:

    Data collected through Statistics Canada's life sciences statistics program indicate that Canada has a sizable biotechnology sector in comparison with larger countries in Europe. This program regularly provides assistance to other countries, which view Canada as a world leader in the development of biotechnology statistics. This article notes the future directions and challenges facing the program.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210324
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is actively involved with the international community in developing statistical information on nanotechnologies. This article summarizes the ongoing work of the OECD's newly-established Working Party on Nanotechnology, with particular emphasis on the role of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210323
    Description:

    Although nanotechnology can be thought of as a sector of its own, it is clear that nanotechnology is a cross-sector phenomenon with potentially significant impacts. Nanotechnologies can be found in areas as diverse as biotechnology and health, agriculture, electronics and computer technology, environment and energy, optics, and in materials and manufacturing.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210331
    Description:

    Highly qualified human resources in science and technology are vital for innovation and economic growth. Both are dependent on the stock of human capital which supplies the labour market with highly skilled workers and helps in the diffusion of advanced knowledge. This article profiles Canada's highly qualified personnel based on immigrant status and place of birth, field of study, and selected demographic and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029240
    Description:

    This article summarizes the Canadian experience in collecting and accessing information on government expenditure (both federal and provincial) on nanotechnology R&D in Canada. The steps taken to measure activities in the private sector on nanotechnology illustrate the many challenges facing measurement of nanotechnology activities.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029242
    Description:

    There is a growing supply of scientists and engineers with doctorates in the natural and applied sciences occupation but, on the other hand, there is a potential for future shortages of university professors concludes a forthcoming Statistics Canada study entitled Where are the Scientists & Engineers? One reason for the lower replacement numbers for university professors is that PhDs may be turning away from educational services towards higher paying industries for employment.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038769
    Description:

    In Canada, innovative biotechnology firms invest large amounts to develop new biotechnology products and processes. In 2003, they invested nearly $1.5 billion in research and development (R&D). In biotechnology, the development process is long and costly, with no guarantee of success. Some firms that discover a new biotechnology product or process with potential industrial applications may want to protect it against any infringement. The patent is a tool preferred by innovative biotechnology firms to protect their invention. This short article describes the patenting activities of biotechnology firms in 2003 and examines the relationship between patents and funding.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028021
    Description:

    Between 1997 and 2003, the number of innovative biotechnology firms rose from 282 to 490. Biotechnology in Canada continued to expand between 2001 and 2003, generating revenues of almost $4 billion. Biotechnology companies have more than quadrupled their revenues since 1997, making biotechnology a fast growing activity.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017768
    Description:

    This article presents data on nanotechnology firms from two perspectives. The first is the number and distribution of firms engaged in research and development of nanotechnologies. The second perspective examines companies providing services to nanotechnology firms. These data contribute to an emerging understanding of the level of nanotechnology activity in the business sector of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026561
    Description:

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology. Has it reached the point that warrants the development of a comprehensive statistical measurement program? If so, what indicators should be used? Major spending initiatives in nanotechnology investing are currently underway. There is precedence for using developed methods and techniques to address the questions 'who,' 'what,' 'where' and 'why.' Statistics Canada's experience may be invaluable in the development of a nanotechnology statistical program.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016474
    Description:

    In 2001, there were 375 biotechnology innovator firms in Canada, an increase of just under 5% from the 358 firms in 1999. Analysis beyond these overall statistics discloses a dynamic churning that is occurring among sectors, provinces and size groups.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026374
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016151
    Description:

    In recent years, comparing national innovative performances has become increasingly important as countries recognize the importance of innovation for economic growth.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016152
    Description:

    The Biotechnology Use & Development Survey-1999 provides insights into the transition from R&D to the commercial use of a technology in products and processes. Improvement in product quality is reported as the number one benefit derived from using biotechnologies. This article explores some of the characteristics of the firms that use biotechnologies addressing the questions: "Why use biotechnology?" and "Why not use biotechnology?"

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035970
    Description:

    This article looks at the use of biotechnology, obstacles to commercialization and information sources on biotechnology.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025752
    Description:

    With revenues of almost $2 billion, what are the characteristics and activities of firms that use or develop biotechnology as an important part of their firm's activities? Human Health biotechnology dominates both the revenue and spending in the biotechnology sector. Read this enlightening article for further details including dicussion on the geographic location and size of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035763
    Description:

    The growing trend towards a knowledge-based economy has impacted the way research is funded and performed in Canadian universities. As higher quality estimates of R&D activities by this sector are of increasing importance to policy makers, Statistics Canada has begun substantial revisions to the methods for calculating estimates for higher education R&D. The implementation of this plan will provide substantially improved estimates of both dollar values and personnel counts for this sector.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043662
    Description:

    This article will first identify key factors that have led to the emergence of logistics. It will then look at the considerations and challenges associated with measuring the emerging logistics services industry.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

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Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900110875
    Description:

    This study is a comparative analysis based on data from the Statistics Canada Bioproducts Development Survey (2003) and the Bioproducts Development and Production Survey 2006. This study examines the current state of the domestic industry, changes occurring over the period, and implications for agriculture.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110580
    Description:

    Data collected through Statistics Canada's life sciences statistics program indicate that Canada has a sizable biotechnology sector in comparison with larger countries in Europe. This program regularly provides assistance to other countries, which view Canada as a world leader in the development of biotechnology statistics. This article notes the future directions and challenges facing the program.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210324
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is actively involved with the international community in developing statistical information on nanotechnologies. This article summarizes the ongoing work of the OECD's newly-established Working Party on Nanotechnology, with particular emphasis on the role of Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210323
    Description:

    Although nanotechnology can be thought of as a sector of its own, it is clear that nanotechnology is a cross-sector phenomenon with potentially significant impacts. Nanotechnologies can be found in areas as diverse as biotechnology and health, agriculture, electronics and computer technology, environment and energy, optics, and in materials and manufacturing.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210331
    Description:

    Highly qualified human resources in science and technology are vital for innovation and economic growth. Both are dependent on the stock of human capital which supplies the labour market with highly skilled workers and helps in the diffusion of advanced knowledge. This article profiles Canada's highly qualified personnel based on immigrant status and place of birth, field of study, and selected demographic and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029240
    Description:

    This article summarizes the Canadian experience in collecting and accessing information on government expenditure (both federal and provincial) on nanotechnology R&D in Canada. The steps taken to measure activities in the private sector on nanotechnology illustrate the many challenges facing measurement of nanotechnology activities.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029239
    Description:

    Since the launch of cellular services in the mid-1980s, mobile phones have largely been a complement to the traditional phone line but that is beginning to change. Recent statistics show that more and more of those making plans for the evening have not only chosen to stay connected wherever they happen to be, they have also chosen to make their cell phone their only means of communication.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060029242
    Description:

    There is a growing supply of scientists and engineers with doctorates in the natural and applied sciences occupation but, on the other hand, there is a potential for future shortages of university professors concludes a forthcoming Statistics Canada study entitled Where are the Scientists & Engineers? One reason for the lower replacement numbers for university professors is that PhDs may be turning away from educational services towards higher paying industries for employment.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038769
    Description:

    In Canada, innovative biotechnology firms invest large amounts to develop new biotechnology products and processes. In 2003, they invested nearly $1.5 billion in research and development (R&D). In biotechnology, the development process is long and costly, with no guarantee of success. Some firms that discover a new biotechnology product or process with potential industrial applications may want to protect it against any infringement. The patent is a tool preferred by innovative biotechnology firms to protect their invention. This short article describes the patenting activities of biotechnology firms in 2003 and examines the relationship between patents and funding.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028021
    Description:

    Between 1997 and 2003, the number of innovative biotechnology firms rose from 282 to 490. Biotechnology in Canada continued to expand between 2001 and 2003, generating revenues of almost $4 billion. Biotechnology companies have more than quadrupled their revenues since 1997, making biotechnology a fast growing activity.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017768
    Description:

    This article presents data on nanotechnology firms from two perspectives. The first is the number and distribution of firms engaged in research and development of nanotechnologies. The second perspective examines companies providing services to nanotechnology firms. These data contribute to an emerging understanding of the level of nanotechnology activity in the business sector of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026561
    Description:

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology. Has it reached the point that warrants the development of a comprehensive statistical measurement program? If so, what indicators should be used? Major spending initiatives in nanotechnology investing are currently underway. There is precedence for using developed methods and techniques to address the questions 'who,' 'what,' 'where' and 'why.' Statistics Canada's experience may be invaluable in the development of a nanotechnology statistical program.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016474
    Description:

    In 2001, there were 375 biotechnology innovator firms in Canada, an increase of just under 5% from the 358 firms in 1999. Analysis beyond these overall statistics discloses a dynamic churning that is occurring among sectors, provinces and size groups.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026374
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's annual Economic Conference provides a forum for the exchange of empirical research among business, government, research and labour communities. The conference is also a means to promote economic and socio-economic analyses while subjecting existing data to critical assessment as part of an ongoing process of statistical development and review. This year's theme was Innovation in an Evolving Economy. At the May 6-7, 2002 conference there were 12 presentations, based directly on the analysis of Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) data. These presentations were given by SIEID analysts, by Statistics Canada analysts in other groups, by facilitated access researchers and by analysts using published or commissioned estimates.

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016151
    Description:

    In recent years, comparing national innovative performances has become increasingly important as countries recognize the importance of innovation for economic growth.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016152
    Description:

    The Biotechnology Use & Development Survey-1999 provides insights into the transition from R&D to the commercial use of a technology in products and processes. Improvement in product quality is reported as the number one benefit derived from using biotechnologies. This article explores some of the characteristics of the firms that use biotechnologies addressing the questions: "Why use biotechnology?" and "Why not use biotechnology?"

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035970
    Description:

    This article looks at the use of biotechnology, obstacles to commercialization and information sources on biotechnology.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025752
    Description:

    With revenues of almost $2 billion, what are the characteristics and activities of firms that use or develop biotechnology as an important part of their firm's activities? Human Health biotechnology dominates both the revenue and spending in the biotechnology sector. Read this enlightening article for further details including dicussion on the geographic location and size of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000035763
    Description:

    The growing trend towards a knowledge-based economy has impacted the way research is funded and performed in Canadian universities. As higher quality estimates of R&D activities by this sector are of increasing importance to policy makers, Statistics Canada has begun substantial revisions to the methods for calculating estimates for higher education R&D. The implementation of this plan will provide substantially improved estimates of both dollar values and personnel counts for this sector.

    Release date: 2000-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043662
    Description:

    This article will first identify key factors that have led to the emergence of logistics. It will then look at the considerations and challenges associated with measuring the emerging logistics services industry.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

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