Statistics by subject – Science and technology

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All (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X201000611361
    Description:

    This survey collects data to monitor science and technology related activities in Canada and to support the development of science and technology policy.

    Release date: 2010-12-08

  • Table: 88-001-X201000211095
    Description:

    Data for fiscal year 2008/2009 comprise science and technology (S&T) expenditures and full-time equivalent personnel allocated to biotechnology research and development (R&D) and related scientific activities (RSA) in selected federal government departments and agencies.

    Release date: 2010-03-10

  • Table: 88-001-X200900410909
    Description:

    The universe for the RDCI consists of all firms known or believed to be involved in the performance or funding of R&D. The frame for this survey has a long history spanning back to the conception of the survey more than 50 years ago. Firms are identified through many sources but most frequently firms are added from the CRA (Canada Revenue Agency) T661 files.

    Release date: 2009-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900110875
    Description:

    This study is a comparative analysis based on data from the Statistics Canada Bioproducts Development Survey (2003) and the Bioproducts Development and Production Survey 2006. This study examines the current state of the domestic industry, changes occurring over the period, and implications for agriculture.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210741
    Description:

    Innovation commercialization, the process of introducing a new or significantly improved product to market, is an important innovation activity for a plant and is the final stage in new product development. Without successful commercialization, innovations may not return any benefits for a plant's innovation efforts. The Survey of Innovation 2005 asked innovative manufacturing plants questions related to commercialization activities and provides information on the type of these activities being undertaken. Market success is measured in terms of the share of revenues in 2004 from product innovations introduced during the years 2002 to 2004.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Table: 88-001-X200800510678
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2008-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110595
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked non-innovative manufacturing plants why they did not innovate; that is, why they did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process to the market during the three-year reference period 2002 to 2004. Lack of market demand was the main response. An examination of repondents' other specified reasons shows that some non-innovators may actually be innovative although they do not perceive themselves to be. Innovative and non-innovative plants perceive success factors, such as developing and seeking new markets, in significantly different ways. Non-innovative plants are not expected to be innovative in the near future.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Table: 88-001-X200700610385
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2007-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210322
    Description:

    This article sheds light on selected characteristics of firms, both innovators and non-innovators that participated in a global supply chain. Using results from the Survey of Innovation 2005, four indicators of global supply chain participation are explored: sales; source of raw materials and components; source of new machinery and equipment; and contracting out of R&D services.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210317
    Description:

    This article summarizes the findings of an econometric study using data from the 2005 Canadian Survey of Innovation. The study looked at the decision of firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector to co-operate on innovation projects. The analysis reveals that the factors influencing the decision to co-operate in order to access external knowledge are very similar to those influencing cost-sharing motives. It also finds that public funding leads firms to co-operate in order to access external knowledge and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039532
    Description:

    Data from the Research and Development in Canadian Industry Survey reveal that between 1994 and 2002 - 31,190 enterprises undertook research and development (R&D) activities for at least one year. However, only 5% (1,699) can be considered persistent R&D performers, appearing on the R&D in Canadian Industry database for nine years. It appears that the size of the R&D expenditure groups that firms belong to influences their level of persistence in R&D performance. This article investigates that premise.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019104
    Description:

    This article analyses trends in business intramural research and development expenditures (BERD) in Alberta over the period between 1994 and 2003 using data from Statistics Canada's Research and Development in Canadian Industry (RDCI) Survey. In Alberta, R&D related to oil and gas activities accounts for much of the growth in BERD in the Oil and Gas Extraction, Manufacturing and Services industries. Of particular interest in the growth of R&D in the Scientific Research and Development Services industry which can be considered as an indicator of the growth of start-ups or venture capital based firms.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Table: 88-001-X20050048062
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028021
    Description:

    Between 1997 and 2003, the number of innovative biotechnology firms rose from 282 to 490. Biotechnology in Canada continued to expand between 2001 and 2003, generating revenues of almost $4 billion. Biotechnology companies have more than quadrupled their revenues since 1997, making biotechnology a fast growing activity.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037435
    Description:

    This study looks at growth in labour productivity in manufacturing companies that increased their use of advanced technology during the mid-1990s.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026932
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2003 Survey of Innovation to examine selected service industries.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026560
    Description:

    Food processing is one of Canada's largest manufacturing industries, consisting of more than 3,000 establishments. Employing close to 230,000 people in 1998, it boasted a gross domestic product of $15 billion that same year. The relationship between the use of advanced manufacturing technology and firm performance during the 1990s, as measured by growth in labour productivity and growth in market share, is the subject of a recently released Statistics Canada study, which finds that a high-technology orientation is closely associated with success.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035966
    Description:

    Two-thirds of advanced technology-using manufacturing establishments experienced some type of skill shortage in the latter part of the 1990s. Shortages were greatest for machine operators, industrial engineers and machinists, with about a quarter of plant managers reporting a shortage in each of these areas. Production managers and computer professionals were next, with one-in-five plants indicating a shortage.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025754
    Description:

    Findings from the Survey of innovation 1999 provide insights into the percent of innovative firms in manufacturing, why these firms innovate, their obstacles to innovation, and the impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

Data (6)

Data (6) (6 of 6 results)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900110875
    Description:

    This study is a comparative analysis based on data from the Statistics Canada Bioproducts Development Survey (2003) and the Bioproducts Development and Production Survey 2006. This study examines the current state of the domestic industry, changes occurring over the period, and implications for agriculture.

    Release date: 2009-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200900110849
    Description:

    This article explores differences in characteristics of innovative and non-innovative manufacturing plants in Canada using results from the Survey of Innovation (SOI) 2005. It finds that innovative plants are more likely than non-innovators to be large, to have employees with higher education credentials, to engage in research and development (R&D) and marketing activities and to have full-time R&D employees. Innovative plants are also more likely to receive external funding, to export and import, to use both formal and informal methods of intellectual property protection, and to have differences in how they rate the importance of success factors.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210741
    Description:

    Innovation commercialization, the process of introducing a new or significantly improved product to market, is an important innovation activity for a plant and is the final stage in new product development. Without successful commercialization, innovations may not return any benefits for a plant's innovation efforts. The Survey of Innovation 2005 asked innovative manufacturing plants questions related to commercialization activities and provides information on the type of these activities being undertaken. Market success is measured in terms of the share of revenues in 2004 from product innovations introduced during the years 2002 to 2004.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110595
    Description:

    The 2005 Survey of Innovation asked non-innovative manufacturing plants why they did not innovate; that is, why they did not introduce a new or significantly improved product or process to the market during the three-year reference period 2002 to 2004. Lack of market demand was the main response. An examination of repondents' other specified reasons shows that some non-innovators may actually be innovative although they do not perceive themselves to be. Innovative and non-innovative plants perceive success factors, such as developing and seeking new markets, in significantly different ways. Non-innovative plants are not expected to be innovative in the near future.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210322
    Description:

    This article sheds light on selected characteristics of firms, both innovators and non-innovators that participated in a global supply chain. Using results from the Survey of Innovation 2005, four indicators of global supply chain participation are explored: sales; source of raw materials and components; source of new machinery and equipment; and contracting out of R&D services.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210317
    Description:

    This article summarizes the findings of an econometric study using data from the 2005 Canadian Survey of Innovation. The study looked at the decision of firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector to co-operate on innovation projects. The analysis reveals that the factors influencing the decision to co-operate in order to access external knowledge are very similar to those influencing cost-sharing motives. It also finds that public funding leads firms to co-operate in order to access external knowledge and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060039532
    Description:

    Data from the Research and Development in Canadian Industry Survey reveal that between 1994 and 2002 - 31,190 enterprises undertook research and development (R&D) activities for at least one year. However, only 5% (1,699) can be considered persistent R&D performers, appearing on the R&D in Canadian Industry database for nine years. It appears that the size of the R&D expenditure groups that firms belong to influences their level of persistence in R&D performance. This article investigates that premise.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019104
    Description:

    This article analyses trends in business intramural research and development expenditures (BERD) in Alberta over the period between 1994 and 2003 using data from Statistics Canada's Research and Development in Canadian Industry (RDCI) Survey. In Alberta, R&D related to oil and gas activities accounts for much of the growth in BERD in the Oil and Gas Extraction, Manufacturing and Services industries. Of particular interest in the growth of R&D in the Scientific Research and Development Services industry which can be considered as an indicator of the growth of start-ups or venture capital based firms.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028021
    Description:

    Between 1997 and 2003, the number of innovative biotechnology firms rose from 282 to 490. Biotechnology in Canada continued to expand between 2001 and 2003, generating revenues of almost $4 billion. Biotechnology companies have more than quadrupled their revenues since 1997, making biotechnology a fast growing activity.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037435
    Description:

    This study looks at growth in labour productivity in manufacturing companies that increased their use of advanced technology during the mid-1990s.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040026932
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2003 Survey of Innovation to examine selected service industries.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026560
    Description:

    Food processing is one of Canada's largest manufacturing industries, consisting of more than 3,000 establishments. Employing close to 230,000 people in 1998, it boasted a gross domestic product of $15 billion that same year. The relationship between the use of advanced manufacturing technology and firm performance during the 1990s, as measured by growth in labour productivity and growth in market share, is the subject of a recently released Statistics Canada study, which finds that a high-technology orientation is closely associated with success.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035966
    Description:

    Two-thirds of advanced technology-using manufacturing establishments experienced some type of skill shortage in the latter part of the 1990s. Shortages were greatest for machine operators, industrial engineers and machinists, with about a quarter of plant managers reporting a shortage in each of these areas. Production managers and computer professionals were next, with one-in-five plants indicating a shortage.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025754
    Description:

    Findings from the Survey of innovation 1999 provide insights into the percent of innovative firms in manufacturing, why these firms innovate, their obstacles to innovation, and the impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

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