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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995085
    Description:

    This paper investigates the characteristics of Canadian manufacturing plants that are related to the use of advanced technologies. The data used are taken from the 1989 Survey of Manufacturing Technology and are linked to administrative data taken from the Census of Manufacturers. Technology use is defined first as incidence (whether a technology is used) and second as intensity (the number of technologies used). These variables (incidence and intensity) are then related to a number of characteristics that represent the competencies of the plant reporting technology use -- its size, the size of its owning enterprise, the recent growth of the plant, the number of industries in which its owning enterprise operates, its age, and nationality. The results are then compared to several recent U.S. studies.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995086
    Description:

    This study examines the factors influencing a firm's decision to train, using data taken from several recent Statistic Canada surveys that explore advanced technology use by Canadian manufacturing plants. Advanced technology adoption has been both rapid and pervasive, leading to concerns about whether technology use is associated with an increase or a decrease in workers' skills. Based on the data collected through two surveys, this paper examines the relationship between technology use and the skill level of workers. It does so by first reporting on the opinions of managers of Canadian manufacturing establishments, who indicate that technology use leads to skill increases. Second, this paper examines the relationship between a plant's decision to train and certain other characteristics of the plant, including its technology use. Third, it investigates the factors related to the location of training in order to determine whether the training done by plants imparts primarily generic skills or plant-specific skills. Finally, it reports on survey results that show plants that introduced new technologies had to increase their expenditures for training.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995075
    Description:

    This study examines technology use in Canada's manufacturing sector, and how a set of technology-using manufacturing establishments performed relative to non-users. Data originates from a recent Statistics Canada survey, asking manufacturing firms about their use of 22 advanced manufacturing technologies, and panel data taken from the Census of Manufacturers.

    Results show that the use of advanced manufacturing technology is widespread, especially in large firms, that multiple-technology use is the norm, and that technologies are generally combined within, as opposed to across, production stages. The technology revolution has been felt more in the area of inspection and communications, and less in fabrication and assembly. In terms of performance, technology-using establishments pay higher wages, enjoy higher labour productivity, and are gaining market share at the expense of non-users.

    Release date: 1995-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995067
    Description:

    The role of technical innovation in economic growth is both a current matter of keen public policy interest, and active exploration in economic theory. However, formal economic theorizing is often constrained by considerations of mathematical tractability. Evolutionary economic theories which are realized as computerized microsimulation models offer significant promise both for transcending mathematical constraints and addressing fundamental questions in a more realistic and flexible manner. This paper sketches XEcon, a microsimulation model of economic growth in the evolutionary tradition.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995074
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of small and medium-sized firms that perform training. It uses data taken from a recent Statistics Canada survey that permit firms' training decisions to be analyzed within the broader context of their many activities and strategies.

    The study finds strong evidence for the hypothesis that human capital development facilitated by training is complementary to innovation and technological change. Training incidence is found to be closely related to the importance that a firm gives to research and development, the use of new technologies, and numerous other strategies that are related to innovation. Training is also greater where a firm emphasizes quality and a comprehensive human-resource strategy. The results point to the inherent complementarity of technology and human resources policy.

    Release date: 1995-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995073
    Description:

    This study investigates differences in the policies being pursued by innovative and non-innovative firms. It focuses on a broad group of strategies -- in marketing, finance, production, management and human resources and asks whether there are key areas in which the strategies being followed by innovative and non-innovative firms differ. It also asks how the activities of firms in each of these areas differs. Finally, it compares the performance of innovative and non-innovative firms. The study finds that innovative firms place a greater emphasis on management, human resources, marketing, financing, government programs and services, and production efficiencies. In most of these areas, innovative firms pursue activities more intensively. Finally, innovative firms are more successful than non-innovative firms.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995076
    Description:

    This study examines the differences in strategies and activities pursued by a sample of more-successful and less-successful group of growing small- and medium-sized enterprises. Amongst other matters, it examines different functional strategies -- the importance of management, human resource practices, marketing, financing, and the innovativeness of the firm. Innovative activities are the most important determinants of success; that is, for a wide range of industries, they serve to discriminate between the more- and the less-successful firms better than any other variable. Almost all of the strategy questions that relate to innovative activity receive higher scores from the more-successful group of firms than from the less-successful group of firms. This is also the case for innovative activities -- whether a firm possesses an R&D unit, its expenditure on R&D relative to total investment, and its R&D-to-sales ratio.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

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Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995085
    Description:

    This paper investigates the characteristics of Canadian manufacturing plants that are related to the use of advanced technologies. The data used are taken from the 1989 Survey of Manufacturing Technology and are linked to administrative data taken from the Census of Manufacturers. Technology use is defined first as incidence (whether a technology is used) and second as intensity (the number of technologies used). These variables (incidence and intensity) are then related to a number of characteristics that represent the competencies of the plant reporting technology use -- its size, the size of its owning enterprise, the recent growth of the plant, the number of industries in which its owning enterprise operates, its age, and nationality. The results are then compared to several recent U.S. studies.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995086
    Description:

    This study examines the factors influencing a firm's decision to train, using data taken from several recent Statistic Canada surveys that explore advanced technology use by Canadian manufacturing plants. Advanced technology adoption has been both rapid and pervasive, leading to concerns about whether technology use is associated with an increase or a decrease in workers' skills. Based on the data collected through two surveys, this paper examines the relationship between technology use and the skill level of workers. It does so by first reporting on the opinions of managers of Canadian manufacturing establishments, who indicate that technology use leads to skill increases. Second, this paper examines the relationship between a plant's decision to train and certain other characteristics of the plant, including its technology use. Third, it investigates the factors related to the location of training in order to determine whether the training done by plants imparts primarily generic skills or plant-specific skills. Finally, it reports on survey results that show plants that introduced new technologies had to increase their expenditures for training.

    Release date: 1995-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995075
    Description:

    This study examines technology use in Canada's manufacturing sector, and how a set of technology-using manufacturing establishments performed relative to non-users. Data originates from a recent Statistics Canada survey, asking manufacturing firms about their use of 22 advanced manufacturing technologies, and panel data taken from the Census of Manufacturers.

    Results show that the use of advanced manufacturing technology is widespread, especially in large firms, that multiple-technology use is the norm, and that technologies are generally combined within, as opposed to across, production stages. The technology revolution has been felt more in the area of inspection and communications, and less in fabrication and assembly. In terms of performance, technology-using establishments pay higher wages, enjoy higher labour productivity, and are gaining market share at the expense of non-users.

    Release date: 1995-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995067
    Description:

    The role of technical innovation in economic growth is both a current matter of keen public policy interest, and active exploration in economic theory. However, formal economic theorizing is often constrained by considerations of mathematical tractability. Evolutionary economic theories which are realized as computerized microsimulation models offer significant promise both for transcending mathematical constraints and addressing fundamental questions in a more realistic and flexible manner. This paper sketches XEcon, a microsimulation model of economic growth in the evolutionary tradition.

    Release date: 1995-06-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995074
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of small and medium-sized firms that perform training. It uses data taken from a recent Statistics Canada survey that permit firms' training decisions to be analyzed within the broader context of their many activities and strategies.

    The study finds strong evidence for the hypothesis that human capital development facilitated by training is complementary to innovation and technological change. Training incidence is found to be closely related to the importance that a firm gives to research and development, the use of new technologies, and numerous other strategies that are related to innovation. Training is also greater where a firm emphasizes quality and a comprehensive human-resource strategy. The results point to the inherent complementarity of technology and human resources policy.

    Release date: 1995-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995073
    Description:

    This study investigates differences in the policies being pursued by innovative and non-innovative firms. It focuses on a broad group of strategies -- in marketing, finance, production, management and human resources and asks whether there are key areas in which the strategies being followed by innovative and non-innovative firms differ. It also asks how the activities of firms in each of these areas differs. Finally, it compares the performance of innovative and non-innovative firms. The study finds that innovative firms place a greater emphasis on management, human resources, marketing, financing, government programs and services, and production efficiencies. In most of these areas, innovative firms pursue activities more intensively. Finally, innovative firms are more successful than non-innovative firms.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995076
    Description:

    This study examines the differences in strategies and activities pursued by a sample of more-successful and less-successful group of growing small- and medium-sized enterprises. Amongst other matters, it examines different functional strategies -- the importance of management, human resource practices, marketing, financing, and the innovativeness of the firm. Innovative activities are the most important determinants of success; that is, for a wide range of industries, they serve to discriminate between the more- and the less-successful firms better than any other variable. Almost all of the strategy questions that relate to innovative activity receive higher scores from the more-successful group of firms than from the less-successful group of firms. This is also the case for innovative activities -- whether a firm possesses an R&D unit, its expenditure on R&D relative to total investment, and its R&D-to-sales ratio.

    Release date: 1995-02-28

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