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All (59) (25 of 59 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001014
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1990 to 2001 as well as the Provincial GERD from 1990 to 1999. Up until 1985, GERD included research and development (R&D) expenditures in the Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) only. Beginning in 1985, Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) activities are also included in GERD. An additional series of tables showing R&D expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1989, or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1989, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001015
    Description:

    This paper provides an explanation of the estimation procedures used to calculate 1999-2000 research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector, as well as further refinement based upon investigations.

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Table: 88-001-X20010127904
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 25 No. 9 of this publication series, released in November 2001. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016031
    Description:

    This article, the second of three, describes elementary and secondary school participation and performance in science and technology (S&T) courses.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016030
    Description:

    This article, the first of three, gives an overview of this study of the determinants of elementary and high school mathematics and science performance, the economic returns of adult literacy, and the diffusion of science and technology (S&T) graduates into the work force.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Table: 88-001-X20010117907
    Description:

    The provincial government sector consists of all provincial government departments, ministries and agencies and provincial research organizations. The Provincial Research Organizations (PRO) are surveyed separately and are not reported here. The PRO values are reported in Vol. 24, No. 4 of these publications.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Table: 88-001-X20010107909
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national R&D effort is small in dollar terms, its impact, particularly in the university sector, is significant. Questionnaires were mailed to 95 private non-profit organizations thought to be supporting research and development activities. Twenty-two organizations reported performing research and development.

    Release date: 2001-12-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 88F0017M
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in an Information System for Science and Technology Project which purpose is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology in Canada. This series publishes analytical work relating to science and technology issues. These documents relate to specific questions or complex analyses derived from survey results conducted at Statistics Canada. More speculative studies related to science and technology issues are also published.

    Release date: 2001-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M2001012
    Description:

    This report covers the use and planned use of 26 advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs) at the establishment level. Additional information on skill requirements, technology development and implementation practices, results of technology adoption, barriers to adoption and firms' research and development activities was obtained from the 1998 Survey of Advanced Technologies in Canadian Manufacturing.

    Release date: 2001-11-29

  • Table: 88-001-X20010097912
    Description:

    This bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 2001-2002. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of the science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. According to international convention, S&T is divided into two fields; Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) and Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). These fields of science are further divided into Research and Development (R&D) and Related Scientific Activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2001-11-20

  • Table: 88-001-X20010087913
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total R&D expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes research and development performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for research and development performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2001-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035967
    Description:

    In 1997, 41% of engineering services firms identified themselves as innovators, but only 4% of them had introduced breakthrough products or processes that had the potential of putting these firms in the role of global leaders. There's more than meets the eye in interpreting the myriad of indicators describing the "system of innovation".

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035970
    Description:

    This article looks at the use of biotechnology, obstacles to commercialization and information sources on biotechnology.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035972
    Description:

    Based on information from the 1997 Biotechnology Firm Survey, we know biotechnology firms generated $813 million in biotech revenues; employed 9,000 people in biotech-related activities and had almost 9,000 products across all stages of development. Explore issues such as - What are the main features of this sector? What is the extent of networking activities by the firms? And what kinds of problems are they facing when selling their products?

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035966
    Description:

    Two-thirds of advanced technology-using manufacturing establishments experienced some type of skill shortage in the latter part of the 1990s. Shortages were greatest for machine operators, industrial engineers and machinists, with about a quarter of plant managers reporting a shortage in each of these areas. Production managers and computer professionals were next, with one-in-five plants indicating a shortage.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035968
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is conducting a pilot survey on Knowledge Management Practices beginning in September 2001. The primary objectives are to determine what business practices are used to support the sharing, transfer, acquisition and retention of knowledge by Canadian firms and whether the firms find these practices effective.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Table: 88-001-X20010077914
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments."

    Release date: 2001-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001174
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the industrial structure in the Canadian manufacturing sector and its relationship to technological change by examining the take-up of advanced technologies and how it is related to the stochastic growth process in the plant population. Its framework is grounded in the view that growth is a stochastic process that involves learning. Experimentation with new technologies rewards some firms with superior growth and profitability. Examining how growth is associated with the choice of different technology strategies indicates which of these is being rewarded.

    The evolution of this process is studied by examining the relationship between the uptake of advanced technologies and the performance of plants in the manufacturing sector. This is done by using cross-sectional data on advanced technology use and by combining it with longitudinal panel data on plant performance. In particular, the paper examines the relationship between the use of information and communications technology (ICT) and the growth in a plant's market share and its relative productivity.

    The study finds that a considerable amount of market share is transferred from declining firms to growing firms over a decade. At the same time, the growers increase their productivity relative to the losers. Those technology users that were using communications technologies or that combined technologies from different classes increased their relative productivity the most. In turn, gains in relative productivity were accompanied by gains in market share. Other factors that were associated with gains in market share were the presence of R&D facilities and other innovative activities.

    Release date: 2001-10-03

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001013
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This is the second in a series of working papers that will examine the results from the Survey of Innovation 1999. This second paper examines innovative manufacturing firms at the provincial level. It includes descriptive statistics and statistical tables for selected questions from the survey.

    Release date: 2001-09-27

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001012
    Description:

    As of 1997, Canadian biotech industry was made of 282 core firms. Of these, 214 were small firms with less than 50 employees, 37 were medium firms with 51 to 150 employees, and 31 were large firms with over 150 employees. They earned $813 million from biotech products sales, $311 million of which were from exports. They employed 9,000 people in biotech related activities and had 8,924 products at all stages of development. Private placements, venture capital and labour sponsored funds were these firms main sources of financing capital. Access to capital was the most serious obstacle faced by the biotech firms in 1997. Marketing and distribution were their major reasons for entertaining strategic alliances, while universities were their most preferred R&D partners.

    Release date: 2001-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001175
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector experience occupational skill shortages, and to the extent that they do, whether these shortages appear to act as impediments to advanced technology adoption. Plants adopting advanced technology report shortages, particularly when it comes to professionals, such as scientists and engineers, and to technical specialists. Whether these shortages pose labour-market problems depends very much on the solutions adapted by the establishments experiencing the shortages. This paper finds that labour shortages did not appear to block technology adoption since those establishments that reported shortages were also the most technologically advanced. Although they faced a greater need for skilled labour, they were able to solve their shortages.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001173
    Description:

    Using survey data, this paper investigates problems that firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector face in their decision to adopt advanced technology. The data show that while the use of advanced technology is relatively important (users account for over 80% of all shipments), it is not widespread among firms (users represent only about one-third of all establishments). One explanation lies in the fact that while advanced technologies provide a wide range of benefits, firms also face a series of problems that impede them from adopting advanced technology. These impediments fall into five groups: cost-related, institution-related, labour-related, organization-related, and information-related.

    While it might be expected that impediments would be higher for non-users than users of technologies, the opposite occurs. We posit that the reason for this is that innovation involves a learning process. Innovators and technology users face problems that they have to solve and the more innovative firms have greater problems. We test this by examining the factors that are related to whether a firm reports that it faced impediments. Our multivariate analysis reveals that impediments are reported more frequently among technology users than non-users; and more frequently among innovating firms than non-innovating ones. We conclude that the information on impediments in technology and other related surveys (innovation) should not be interpreted as impenetrable barriers that prevent technology adoption. Rather, these surveys indicate areas where successful firms face and solve problems.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001009
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D. In this report some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel are presented. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001011
    Description:

    This paper provides a summary of the strategies and business practices of biotechnology firms, and information on the business environment faced by these firms. These issues, considered in conjunction with information on revenue, research and development, import and export, product pipeline and human resources characteristics of biotechnology firms, contribute to a more comprehensive portrait of the biotechnology sector in Canada.

    Release date: 2001-08-28

Data (12)

Data (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X20010127904
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 25 No. 9 of this publication series, released in November 2001. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Table: 88-001-X20010117907
    Description:

    The provincial government sector consists of all provincial government departments, ministries and agencies and provincial research organizations. The Provincial Research Organizations (PRO) are surveyed separately and are not reported here. The PRO values are reported in Vol. 24, No. 4 of these publications.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Table: 88-001-X20010107909
    Description:

    This release provides data on the research and development activities of the private non-profit sector. Although the contribution of this sector to the national R&D effort is small in dollar terms, its impact, particularly in the university sector, is significant. Questionnaires were mailed to 95 private non-profit organizations thought to be supporting research and development activities. Twenty-two organizations reported performing research and development.

    Release date: 2001-12-05

  • Table: 88-001-X20010097912
    Description:

    This bulletin provides recent information on the performance and funding of Federal Government Expenditures on Scientific Activities, 2001-2002. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of the science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. According to international convention, S&T is divided into two fields; Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) and Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH). These fields of science are further divided into Research and Development (R&D) and Related Scientific Activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2001-11-20

  • Table: 88-001-X20010087913
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total R&D expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes research and development performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for research and development performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2001-11-02

  • Table: 88-001-X20010077914
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments."

    Release date: 2001-10-26

  • Table: 88-001-X20010067915
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 1999 survey of industrial research and development activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of research and development in Canada. The use of CCRA data results in a small understatement in total figures for the most recent years reported.

    Release date: 2001-07-16

  • Table: 88-001-X20010057916
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development . The number of research and development personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on research and development . The Frascati Manual states that "Data on the utilisation of scientific and technical personnel provide concrete measurements for international comparisons of resources devoted to research and development.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Table: 88-001-X20010047917
    Description:

    Biotechnology is an enabling technology - one that has been compared to electricity or microelectronics - because it has the potential to transform production processes, products and services in a wide range of sectors of the economy. At present, major applications of biotechnology are taking place in health, agriculture and agrifood, and natural resources (e.g. forestry and mining). This survey is intended to quantify the level of industrial activity in biotechnology research and development by sector of application and to reveal trends in spending.

    Release date: 2001-05-18

  • Table: 88-001-X20010037919
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and person-years allocated to biotechnology for the year 1999-2000 were collected from selected federal departments and agencies. The criterion for selection was significant activity in this field. Survey results contribute to the work of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy.

    Release date: 2001-05-18

  • Table: 88-001-X20010027920
    Description:

    Canadian health research is conducted in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign.

    Release date: 2001-03-30

  • Table: 88-001-X20010017921
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 24, No. 5 of this publication, released in November, 2000. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2001-01-31

Analysis (30)

Analysis (30) (25 of 30 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016031
    Description:

    This article, the second of three, describes elementary and secondary school participation and performance in science and technology (S&T) courses.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010016030
    Description:

    This article, the first of three, gives an overview of this study of the determinants of elementary and high school mathematics and science performance, the economic returns of adult literacy, and the diffusion of science and technology (S&T) graduates into the work force.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 88F0017M
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in an Information System for Science and Technology Project which purpose is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology in Canada. This series publishes analytical work relating to science and technology issues. These documents relate to specific questions or complex analyses derived from survey results conducted at Statistics Canada. More speculative studies related to science and technology issues are also published.

    Release date: 2001-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M2001012
    Description:

    This report covers the use and planned use of 26 advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs) at the establishment level. Additional information on skill requirements, technology development and implementation practices, results of technology adoption, barriers to adoption and firms' research and development activities was obtained from the 1998 Survey of Advanced Technologies in Canadian Manufacturing.

    Release date: 2001-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035967
    Description:

    In 1997, 41% of engineering services firms identified themselves as innovators, but only 4% of them had introduced breakthrough products or processes that had the potential of putting these firms in the role of global leaders. There's more than meets the eye in interpreting the myriad of indicators describing the "system of innovation".

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035970
    Description:

    This article looks at the use of biotechnology, obstacles to commercialization and information sources on biotechnology.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035972
    Description:

    Based on information from the 1997 Biotechnology Firm Survey, we know biotechnology firms generated $813 million in biotech revenues; employed 9,000 people in biotech-related activities and had almost 9,000 products across all stages of development. Explore issues such as - What are the main features of this sector? What is the extent of networking activities by the firms? And what kinds of problems are they facing when selling their products?

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035966
    Description:

    Two-thirds of advanced technology-using manufacturing establishments experienced some type of skill shortage in the latter part of the 1990s. Shortages were greatest for machine operators, industrial engineers and machinists, with about a quarter of plant managers reporting a shortage in each of these areas. Production managers and computer professionals were next, with one-in-five plants indicating a shortage.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035968
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is conducting a pilot survey on Knowledge Management Practices beginning in September 2001. The primary objectives are to determine what business practices are used to support the sharing, transfer, acquisition and retention of knowledge by Canadian firms and whether the firms find these practices effective.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001174
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the industrial structure in the Canadian manufacturing sector and its relationship to technological change by examining the take-up of advanced technologies and how it is related to the stochastic growth process in the plant population. Its framework is grounded in the view that growth is a stochastic process that involves learning. Experimentation with new technologies rewards some firms with superior growth and profitability. Examining how growth is associated with the choice of different technology strategies indicates which of these is being rewarded.

    The evolution of this process is studied by examining the relationship between the uptake of advanced technologies and the performance of plants in the manufacturing sector. This is done by using cross-sectional data on advanced technology use and by combining it with longitudinal panel data on plant performance. In particular, the paper examines the relationship between the use of information and communications technology (ICT) and the growth in a plant's market share and its relative productivity.

    The study finds that a considerable amount of market share is transferred from declining firms to growing firms over a decade. At the same time, the growers increase their productivity relative to the losers. Those technology users that were using communications technologies or that combined technologies from different classes increased their relative productivity the most. In turn, gains in relative productivity were accompanied by gains in market share. Other factors that were associated with gains in market share were the presence of R&D facilities and other innovative activities.

    Release date: 2001-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001175
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector experience occupational skill shortages, and to the extent that they do, whether these shortages appear to act as impediments to advanced technology adoption. Plants adopting advanced technology report shortages, particularly when it comes to professionals, such as scientists and engineers, and to technical specialists. Whether these shortages pose labour-market problems depends very much on the solutions adapted by the establishments experiencing the shortages. This paper finds that labour shortages did not appear to block technology adoption since those establishments that reported shortages were also the most technologically advanced. Although they faced a greater need for skilled labour, they were able to solve their shortages.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001173
    Description:

    Using survey data, this paper investigates problems that firms in the Canadian manufacturing sector face in their decision to adopt advanced technology. The data show that while the use of advanced technology is relatively important (users account for over 80% of all shipments), it is not widespread among firms (users represent only about one-third of all establishments). One explanation lies in the fact that while advanced technologies provide a wide range of benefits, firms also face a series of problems that impede them from adopting advanced technology. These impediments fall into five groups: cost-related, institution-related, labour-related, organization-related, and information-related.

    While it might be expected that impediments would be higher for non-users than users of technologies, the opposite occurs. We posit that the reason for this is that innovation involves a learning process. Innovators and technology users face problems that they have to solve and the more innovative firms have greater problems. We test this by examining the factors that are related to whether a firm reports that it faced impediments. Our multivariate analysis reveals that impediments are reported more frequently among technology users than non-users; and more frequently among innovating firms than non-innovating ones. We conclude that the information on impediments in technology and other related surveys (innovation) should not be interpreted as impenetrable barriers that prevent technology adoption. Rather, these surveys indicate areas where successful firms face and solve problems.

    Release date: 2001-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010015787
    Description:

    Canada's new media sector continues to grow, despite the collapse of many dot-coms on the world market, not to mention the need for new revenue models and legal disputes on matters of intellectual property and Internet rights. While these issues persist, Canada's new media producers are creating original Canadian content products of high quality.

    Release date: 2001-08-16

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010015781
    Description:

    This article examines characteristics of the specialized design services industry in Canada. While the industry is relatively small, it is strategically important as good design can make products and services more competitive.

    Release date: 2001-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001165
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which customers/suppliers innovation networks are related to the size and pattern of inter-industry goods flows. It does so by devising a diversification index to measure the nature of inter-industry links that arise from the flow of goods and services from suppliers to customers. It then relates these diversification patterns to the importance of customer and supplier innovation networks.

    Input/output matrices are used to measure the extent of inter-industry links and the pattern of inter-industry goods flows. The importance of customer/supplier networks is derived from data coming from the 1993 Survey of Innovation and Advanced Technology.

    The study finds that the importance of supplier and of customer innovation networks is related to the structure of inter-industry trade flows. Where there are a small number of important backward inter-industry links, firms are more likely to make greater use of supplier partnerships. On the other hand, the importance of customer links increases when there is a large number of industry linkages downstream.

    Release date: 2001-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025754
    Description:

    Findings from the Survey of innovation 1999 provide insights into the percent of innovative firms in manufacturing, why these firms innovate, their obstacles to innovation, and the impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010025752
    Description:

    With revenues of almost $2 billion, what are the characteristics and activities of firms that use or develop biotechnology as an important part of their firm's activities? Human Health biotechnology dominates both the revenue and spending in the biotechnology sector. Read this enlightening article for further details including dicussion on the geographic location and size of Canadian biotechnology firms.

    Release date: 2001-05-02

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M2001011
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of the technological and performance indicators, organized into a system of innovation. The elements of the system are linked together as inputs, outcomes and impacts in order to form a coherent picture of the relationship between technological change and its economic impact.

    Release date: 2001-04-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001154
    Description:

    This paper examines the ways that innovation status as opposed to technology use affects the training activities of manufacturing plants. It examines training that is introduced as a response to specific skill shortages versus training that is implemented in response to the introduction of advanced equipment.

    Advanced technology users are more likely to have workers in highly skilled occupations, to face greater shortages for these workers, and they are more likely to train workers in response to these shortages than are plants that do not use advanced technologies.

    The introduction of new techniques is also accompanied by differences in the incidence of training, with advanced technology users being more likely to introduce training programs than non-users. Here, innovation status within the group of technology users also affects the training decision. In particular, innovating and non-innovating technology users diverge with regards to the extent and nature of training that is undertaken in response to the introduction of new advanced equipment. Innovators are more likely to provide training for this purpose and to prefer on-the-job training to other forms. Non-innovators are less likely to offer training under these circumstances and when they do, it is more likely to be done in a classroom, either off-site or at the firm.

    These findings emphasize that training occurs for more than one reason. Shortages related to insufficient supply provide one rational. But it is not here that innovative firms stand out. Rather they appear to respond differentially to the introduction of new equipment by extensively implementing training that is highly firm-specific. This suggests that innovation requires new skills that are not so much occupation specific (though that is no doubt present) but general cognitive skills that come from operating in an innovative environment that involves improving the problem-solving capabilities of many in the workforce. These problem-solving capabilities occur in a learning-by-doing setting with hands on experience.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010015586
    Description:

    Knowledge leads to innovation and innovation, in turn, sets in motion a new cycle of learning as firms try to find solutions to complex problems. A survey of innovation covering the three-year period 1994-96 ranks more than 2,000 firms on a knowledge-intensity scale.

    Release date: 2001-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010015585
    Description:

    The adoption of the Internet by Canadian households continues to grow. With the cable industry having gone through considerable change over the last decade and the entry of cable operators into the Internet access service market, competition will extend to new markets.

    Release date: 2001-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010015584
    Description:

    According to the findings of the 1999 Survey of Innovation, one third of innovative manufacturing firms in Canada develop new products and processes in collaboration with partners. The three most important reasons for this collaboration are 1. accessing critical expertise, 2. accessing R&D, and 3. prototype development. Eighty-eight percent (88%) of collaborating firms have partners in Canada and two thirds have partners in the United States.

    Release date: 2001-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010015591
    Description:

    The Quebec Institute of Statistics hosted a forum for Statistics Canada and provincial government experts dealing with the subject of science and technology statistics.

    Release date: 2001-03-13

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010015588
    Description:

    Where? How often? Why? For what? The Internet is becoming an important fixture in Canadian households. More Canadians are becoming "plugged-in" to the Internet. Despite this increasing use, there are disparities in Internet use.

    Release date: 2001-03-13

Reference (17)

Reference (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001014
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1990 to 2001 as well as the Provincial GERD from 1990 to 1999. Up until 1985, GERD included research and development (R&D) expenditures in the Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) only. Beginning in 1985, Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) activities are also included in GERD. An additional series of tables showing R&D expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1989, or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1989, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001015
    Description:

    This paper provides an explanation of the estimation procedures used to calculate 1999-2000 research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector, as well as further refinement based upon investigations.

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001013
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This is the second in a series of working papers that will examine the results from the Survey of Innovation 1999. This second paper examines innovative manufacturing firms at the provincial level. It includes descriptive statistics and statistical tables for selected questions from the survey.

    Release date: 2001-09-27

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001012
    Description:

    As of 1997, Canadian biotech industry was made of 282 core firms. Of these, 214 were small firms with less than 50 employees, 37 were medium firms with 51 to 150 employees, and 31 were large firms with over 150 employees. They earned $813 million from biotech products sales, $311 million of which were from exports. They employed 9,000 people in biotech related activities and had 8,924 products at all stages of development. Private placements, venture capital and labour sponsored funds were these firms main sources of financing capital. Access to capital was the most serious obstacle faced by the biotech firms in 1997. Marketing and distribution were their major reasons for entertaining strategic alliances, while universities were their most preferred R&D partners.

    Release date: 2001-09-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001009
    Description:

    Canada's economic growth and competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in research and development (R&D). The number of R&D personnel is a supplementary measure to the statistics on intramural expenditures on R&D. In this report some statistical estimates and definitions concerning R&D personnel are presented. Data on R&D personnel are derived from surveys and from estimates based on various data sources.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001011
    Description:

    This paper provides a summary of the strategies and business practices of biotechnology firms, and information on the business environment faced by these firms. These issues, considered in conjunction with information on revenue, research and development, import and export, product pipeline and human resources characteristics of biotechnology firms, contribute to a more comprehensive portrait of the biotechnology sector in Canada.

    Release date: 2001-08-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001010
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This is the first in a series of working papers that will examine the results from the Survey of Innovation 1999. This first paper examines innovative manufacturing firms. It includes descriptive statistics and statistical tables for selected questions from the survey. Subsequent papers will include an examination of innovation in manufacturing at the provincial level, and innovation in selected natural resource industries at the national level and at the provincial level.

    Release date: 2001-06-27

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001004
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. This working paper presents descriptive statistics on business environment, success factors, use and planned use of advanced technologies, use and planned use of advanced practices, source of information, obstacles and impact.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001008
    Description:

    This document presents historical tables displaying Federal Government expenditures and personnel in the Natural and Social Sciences, 1991-92 to 2000-2001. Expenditures and personnel for each fiscal year to 1998-99 are actual while the data for 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 are forecasts and estimates respectively.

    Release date: 2001-05-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2000003
    Description:

    In the spring of 1999, the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division of Statistics Canada (SIEID) decided to review the methods it uses to estimate Higher Education R&D Expenditures (HERD) and Health Gross Expenditures on R&D (Health GERD). The manner in which research is performed and funded in Canadian universities and research hospitals has evolved in recent years, and current methodologies may not take these changes into account. By improving HERD, the health GERD estimates will also benefit. It may be possible to improve them yet again by building upon recent work at Statistics Canada on biotechnology R&D in Canadian Industry.

    In September 1999, an initial study and its recommendations generated a positive reaction from a group of professionals in the university and health research fields. SIEID then created a Working Group and hired a facilitator to examine current estimation methods, to recommend revisions where appropriate, and to produce a framework for an improved program in this area. This document is the final report written by the facilitator, Mireille Brochu.

    Release date: 2001-05-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2000002
    Description:

    This document presents historical tables displaying federal government expenditures and personnel in the natural and social sciences, 1991-92 to 2000-2001. Expenditures and personnel for each fiscal year to 1998-99 are actual while the data for 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 are forecasts and estimates respectively.

    Release date: 2001-05-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001005
    Description:

    This document presents the provincial distribution of federal government expenditures on science and technology (S&T). The statistics presented in this report are supplements of data published in the service bulletin "Science statistics" Vol. 25, no. 1, catalogue no. 88-001XIB.

    Release date: 2001-04-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001006
    Description:

    Canadian health research is conducted in universities, teaching hospitals, business enterprises, government laboratories and private non-profit organizations. This research is funded from a variety of sources including public, private, domestic and foreign. This is the second time Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division (SIEID) of Statistics Canada has published an estimate of health R&D spending in Canada.

    Release date: 2001-04-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001007
    Description:

    This paper provides estimates for firms actively involved in the development of new products and processes using biotechnologies. The survey examines the use of biotechnology and the development of biotechnologies in Canada's industrial sector for the 1999 fiscal year. The Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999 was conducted as part of a project to develop biotechnology statistics and was funded under the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy. Several departments and agencies provided important inputs at various stages of the survey. They are Industry Canada, the Canadian Biotechnology Secretariat, Agriculture Canada, the National Research Council, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Health Canada, and Environment Canada.

    Release date: 2001-03-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001002
    Description:

    This paper provides an explanation of the new estimation procedures used for the first time for the fiscal year 1998-99 to calculate research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector.

    Release date: 2001-02-26

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001003
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. It was based on a list of businesses classified to construction industries taken from the Statistics Canada's Business Register. The survey consists of eight sections with questions on business environment; success factors; use and planned use of advanced technologies; use and planned use of advanced practices; mergers, acquisitions and expansions; sources of information; obstacles; and impact.

    Release date: 2001-02-26

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001001
    Description:

    This publication presents the national estimates of research and development expenditures (GERD) from 1989 to 2000 as well as the provincial GERD from 1989 to 1998. Up until 1985, GERD included research and development (R&D expenditures in the natural sciences and engineering (NSE) only. Beginning in 1985, social sciences and humanities (SSH) activities are also included in GERD. An additional series of tables showing R&D expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1988, or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1988, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 2001-02-26

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