Statistics by subject – Science and technology

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  • Table: 88-001-X20040127851
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total R&D expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes R&D performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for R&D performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2004-12-10

  • Table: 88-001-X20040117852
    Description:

    This bulletin presents recent information on the performance and funding of Federal government expenditures on scientific activities, 2004-2005. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. The data in this publication are consistent with expenditures of departments and agencies as reported in the Main Estimates 2004-2005, but do not reflect changes to 2004-2005 spending plans which may result from supplementary estimates or other departmental planning decisions.

    Release date: 2004-11-24

  • Table: 88-001-X20040107853
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of postsecondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments.

    Release date: 2004-11-23

  • Table: 88-001-X20040097861
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2002 survey of industrial R&D activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of R&D in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of R&D in Canada. The use of CCRA data results in a small understatement in total figures for the most recent years reported and this is explained in the note on Methodology on page 9. The 2002 survey conducted in 2003 collects data on actual R&D spending in 2002, on preliminary figures for 2003, and on spending intentions for 2004.

    Release date: 2004-08-05

  • Table: 88-001-X20040077864
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and person-years allocated to biotechnology for the year 2002-2003 were collected from selected federal departments and agencies. The criterion for selection was significant activity in this field. Survey results contribute to the work of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy. The data collected for biotechnology are composed of research and development (R&D) and related scientific activities (RSA) expenditures, for intramural and extramural activities, by performer, and also the person-years associated with these activities.

    Release date: 2004-07-19

  • Table: 88-001-X20040087863
    Description:

    Expenditures on Health R&D are growing as a percentage of Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development (GERD). Between the years 1996 and 2000, research and development expenditures in the health field represented approximately 18% of total R&D expenditures in Canada. In the last three years, this percentage has grown to 20% (2001), 22% (2002) and 23% (2003 preliminary estimates). This service bulletin presents details of expenditures on Health R&D performance and funding.

    Release date: 2004-07-19

  • Table: 88-001-X20040067865
    Description:

    The provincial government sector consists of all provincial government departments, ministries and agencies and provincial research organizations (PRO). The PRO are surveyed separately and are not reported here. The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by Scientific and technological policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for inter-provincial and inter-sectoral comparisons. The surveys that generate these statistics also provide input for the development of a national aggregated R&D series. These national Research and Development estimates are used by businesses, governments and international organizations such as the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Table: 88-001-X20040057866
    Description:

    Statistics presented are derived from seven Provincial Research Organizations All of these organizations have been established by their respective provincial and territorial governments, with a variety of enabling legislation and powers, to provide technical support to primary and secondary industries, to assist in the exploitation of provincial and territorial natural resources and to enhance the economy of their provinces and territories.

    Release date: 2004-05-20

  • Table: 88-001-X20040047867
    Description:

    This release provides data on the Research and Development activities of the private non-profit sector. The growing partnerships between Universities, Hospitals and Research Institutes has reduced the impact of the Private Non-Profit sector in the national Research and Development effort. Due to the decreasing magnitude of this sector, we will no longer feature the PNP data in our Service Bulletin series. Statistics Canada will continue to collect the data as it contributes to Gross Expenditures on Research and Development (GERD). Users are invited to contact us for special requests. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the private non-profit organizations for their continued cooperation.

    Release date: 2004-04-08

  • Table: 88-001-X20040037868
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 27 No. 8 of this publication series, released in December 2003. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2004-02-12

  • Table: 88-001-X20040017871
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of post-secondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments"1 The higher education sector is one of the sectors that make up the national research and development (R&D) system. For most policy analysis, the R&D system is sub-divided into five performing sectors: the federal government, provincial governments, business enterprise, higher education, and private non-profit. It is also sub-divided into six funding sectors: the five above plus all foreign sources.

    Release date: 2004-01-28

  • Table: 88-001-X20040027869
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total research and development expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes research and development performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for research and development performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2004-01-28

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  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004020
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1993 to 2004 as well as the provincial GERD from 1993 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-12-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004021
    Description:

    This working paper outlines the critical growth factors resulting from interviews with senior business managers. It also explores additional sources of data and makes recommendations for the content of possible future surveys.

    Release date: 2004-12-10

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007457
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004019
    Description:

    This publication is an explanation of the estimation procedures used to calculate 2002-2003 research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector. This estimation procedure was revised in 2000 as R&D activities in the higher education sector have increased in importance to policy developers, major funders of these activities, and also to the performing institutions themselves. In 2002-2003 the R&D expenditures for higher education were estimated to total $7.4 billion, an increase of 16% over 2001-2002 revised estimates.

    Release date: 2004-11-23

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004018
    Description:

    This paper examines the first Canadian attempt to assess the impacts on the economy of the transfer of technology for federally-funded research.

    Release date: 2004-11-02

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004017
    Description:

    Using data from the 1997 Biotechnology Firm Survey and the 1999 and 2001 cycles of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey, this article portrays the evolution of key indicators of Canadian biotechnology companies from 1997 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-10-22

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004016
    Description:

    These papers are the product of five research workshops held between 1997 and 2002. Published by Kluwer Academic Publishers of Boston, these papers appear only in these books, they are listed here by volume and author as an aid to research into technological and related organizational change.

    Release date: 2004-10-08

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004015
    Description:

    This working paper analyses data from the 1999 Survey of Innovation, comparing the percentage of innovative establishments in Canadian communities to the national estimate. Trends by type of geographic area and by location are also discussed.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004014
    Description:

    This paper provides detailed information on public, private, domestic and foreign sources of funding for Canadian health research.

    Release date: 2004-07-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004013
    Description:

    This paper presents an index of specialization (the location quotient) for Canada's 50 largest communities. It also presents the initial analysis comparing changes in specialization in selected high-technology industries with changes in employment in these communities.

    Release date: 2004-07-16

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004012
    Description:

    This document provides an overview of currently available data on federal government support for scientific activities by industry groups. The statistics presented are derived from government listings of the recipients of federal payments made in connection with scientific activity from1997/98 to 2001/02.

    Release date: 2004-07-15

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004011
    Description:

    The information in this document is intended primarily to be used by scientific and technological (S&T) policy makers, both federal and provincial, largely as a basis for inter-provincial and inter-sectoral comparisons. The statistics are aggregates of the provincial government science surveys conducted by Statistics Canada under contract with the provinces, and cover the period 1994/95 to 2002/03.

    Release date: 2004-06-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004009
    Description:

    The Canadian economy is characterized by the size of the service sector. Elsewhere, the research and development (R&D) activity contributes to the growth of the economy. Paradoxically, R&D is sometime considered as an activity performed by the manufacturing sector. This article sheds light on the importance of efforts dedicated to R&D in the business services sector.

    Release date: 2004-04-14

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004008
    Description:

    For 2002, the rate of technology adoption in the public sector stood at close to double that of the private sector: 82% versus 42%. Quite obviously, not all turn-of-the-century technological change within the public sector was directly linked to the Year 2000 phenomena. Rather, public sector organizations appear to refresh their technologies on a continual basis. It also appears that the public sector remains committed to supporting the acquisition of significantly improved technologies through training.

    This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made with the private sector, with special attention given to employment size groups. The paper outlines the methods employed to acquire new technologies. It also provides an overview of three sectors within the public sector: educational services, health care and social services, and public administration.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004006
    Description:

    Biotechnology is a pervasive technology used in several industrial sectors, making collecting sound data a real challenge. This paper describes the methodology of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Some of the specific issues dealt with are the definitions of biotechnology and innovative biotechnology firms, the target population, sampling, data collection procedures, and data quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004005
    Description:

    This document presents the geographical distribution of federal government expenditures on science and technology. The statistics presented in this report are supplements of data published in the Service Bulletin 'Science Statistics' Volume 28, Number 3, Catalogue no. 88-001XIE.

    Included in this report are tables presenting expenditures and staff of federal government scientific establishments for the fiscal year 2001/02.

    Release date: 2004-02-12

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004002
    Description:

    This publication explains the estimation procedures used to calculate 2001/02 research and development (R&D) expenditures in the Higher Education sector. The Higher Education Research and Development (HERD) performance figures are estimated using a new technique that was developed in 2000 and first applied to the 1998/99 data. It assumes that the total expenditures on HERD are equal to the sum of

    a) sponsored research (available from Canadian Association of University Business Officers [CAUBO] sources)b) an estimate of indirect expenditures on sponsored researchc) a value for the fraction of faculty time devoted to sponsored and non-sponsored researchd) an estimate of indirect expenditures related to faculty time on researche) teaching hospitals data not included in CAUBO data.

    Release date: 2004-01-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004003
    Description:

    This publication presents the national gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) from 1992 to 2003, as well as the provincial GERD from 1992 to 2001. Up until 1985, GERD only included research and development (R&D) expenditures in the Natural Sciences and Engineering (NSE) field. Beginning in 1985, Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) activities have also been included in GERD. An additional series of tables showing R&D expenditures at the national level in either science from 1963 to 1991, or at the provincial level from 1979 to 1991, may be obtained from the Science and Innovation Surveys Section of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division.

    Release date: 2004-01-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004004
    Description:

    These notes capture some of the presentations and the subsequent discussions that took place during the meeting of Statistics Canada's Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division. For two full days, over 20 people talked about innovation from different perspectives and sought common understanding of the issues and consensus on where work on the subject should take the form of medium or longer terms. The meeting had a Canadian bias as it was part of the foresight progam of the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, but it would not have been as productive had Jan Fagerberg not been able to join the group and share the work of the Towards a European Area of Research and Innovation (TEARI) project, which he leads. The meeting was further enriched by the insights gained as members of different communities of discourse exchanged their knowledge and arrived at common conclusions.

    Release date: 2004-01-26

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

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