Statistics by subject – Science and technology

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All (51)

All (51) (25 of 51 results)

Data (9)

Data (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Table: 88-001-X20050088979
    Description:

    Gross domestic expenditures on research and development (GERD) represents total R&D expenditures performed in a country's national territory during a given year. GERD includes R&D performed within a country and funded from abroad but excludes payments sent abroad for R&D performed in other countries.

    Release date: 2005-12-09

  • Table: 88-001-X20050078978
    Description:

    This bulletin presents recent information on the performance and funding of Federal government expenditures on scientific activities, 2005/2006. The statistics presented are derived from the survey of science and technology (S&T) activities of federal departments and agencies. The data in this publication are consistent with expenditures of departments and agencies as reported in the Main Estimates 2005/2006, but do not reflect changes to 2005/2006 spending plans which may result from supplementary estimates or other departmental planning decisions.

    Release date: 2005-12-08

  • Table: 88-001-X20050068977
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of postsecondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments.

    Release date: 2005-12-07

  • Table: 88-001-X20050058436
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains estimates of total spending on research and development (R&D) in the health field in Canada. Tables demonstrate expenditures on health R&D by both performer and funder from 1988 to 2004 preliminary estimates. Historical data indicates that in Canada, health R&D expenditures as a percentage of Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development (GERD), are growing.

    Release date: 2005-07-27

  • Table: 88-001-X20050048062
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Table: 88-001-X20050037933
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and full-time equivalent allocated to biotechnology for the fiscal year 2003-2004 were collected from selected federal departments and agencies. Survey results contribute to the work of the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy.

    The S&T data collected for biotechnology are composed of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and related scientific activities (RSA) for both intramural and extramural performers and also the full-time equivalent associated with these activities.

    Release date: 2005-05-11

  • Table: 88-001-X20050027847
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2005-05-03

  • Table: 88-524-X
    Description:

    The tables provide information on the innovation in the business unit; business unit success factors; new or significantly improved products and processes; unfinished or abandoned innovation activities; innovation activities; sources of information for innovation; co-operative and collaborative arrangements for innovation; obstacles to innovation; impact of innovation; protection of intellectual property and government support programs. The CD provides 1,134 statistical tables based on the Survey of Innovation 2003. The estimates are presented on a national and provincial/territorial level by selected service industries.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Table: 88-001-X20050017848
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 28, No. 11 of this publication series, released in November 2004. Science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2005-01-25

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038760
    Description:

    In recent years, the Government of Canada has made substantial new investment in university research with research funding of $4.0 billion in 2003. To commercialize their technologies, Canadian universities and hospitals created 64 spin-off companies in 2003, for a total of 876 created to date. This article highlights some of the changes between 2001 and 2003, as well as presenting the latest regional results.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038768
    Description:

    Measuring industrial research and development interests many analysts of science and technology. Comparing Canada with other G-7 countries is common in other areas. This article links those two concepts and provides highlights.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038769
    Description:

    In Canada, innovative biotechnology firms invest large amounts to develop new biotechnology products and processes. In 2003, they invested nearly $1.5 billion in research and development (R&D). In biotechnology, the development process is long and costly, with no guarantee of success. Some firms that discover a new biotechnology product or process with potential industrial applications may want to protect it against any infringement. The patent is a tool preferred by innovative biotechnology firms to protect their invention. This short article describes the patenting activities of biotechnology firms in 2003 and examines the relationship between patents and funding.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038761
    Description:

    For many organizations involved in economic development, business incubation is a key to creating and nurturing new business. There is currently very little information available on the business incubator sector in Canada. A new Statistics Canada pilot survey will collect and benchmark vital information on this largely unknown sector of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050038767
    Description:

    In the context of the progressive depletion of the world's fossil fuel reserves, energy research and development (R&D) is turning towards renewable resources. This article shows a rise during the period 2000 to 2002, compared with the period 1994 to 1996, in the share of R&D dedicated to energy "alternatives", and in particular to renewable energy resources. Between the same periods, expenditures for "traditional" types of energy R&D have fallen.

    Release date: 2005-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028018
    Description:

    Does innovation thrive best in industry clusters? That is, is a company more likely to be innovative if it is located close to many of its rivals? And what role does research at a local university play on industrial innovation? A recent study based on data from a Statistics Canada innovation survey, finds that firms located near their rivals or universities are no more innovative than other firms in the same industry are, except at extremely short distances.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028020
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 2003 surveyed establishments in 36 services industries with a view to better understand innovation in the service sector. The services industries surveyed included information and communications technology industries (ICT); selected professional, scientific and technical services, selected natural resources industries and selected transportation industries. Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003, which examined innovation in selected service industries, show that establishments in ICT service industries are most likely to be innovative. In Canada, the three industries with the highest rates of innovation were all ICT industries.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028021
    Description:

    Between 1997 and 2003, the number of innovative biotechnology firms rose from 282 to 490. Biotechnology in Canada continued to expand between 2001 and 2003, generating revenues of almost $4 billion. Biotechnology companies have more than quadrupled their revenues since 1997, making biotechnology a fast growing activity.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028017
    Description:

    Statistics Canada has been working with NRC-IRAP on a series of projects to better understand the characteristics of growth firms. The first phase of the study concluded that one needed to take into account a company's stage in its lifecycle, its industry and even the "management style" to better understand how these growth factors applied.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028016
    Description:

    In a recent study using data from the Canadian Survey of Innovation 1999, the authors examined the effect of R&D tax credits on innovation activities of Canadian manufacturing firms. They found positive effects on the propensity of firms to perform R&D activities such the introduction to the market of a new product or process that was a world first. However, there is no significant effect on more general firm performance indicators such as profitability, domestic market share or international market share.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005032
    Description:

    Estimates of GDP are sensitive to whether a business expenditure is treated as an investment or an intermediate input. Shifting an expenditure category from intermediate expenditures to investment expenditures increases GDP. While the international guide to measurement (the SNA (93)) recognizes that R&D has certain characteristics that make it more akin to an investment than an intermediate expenditure, it did not recommend that R&D be treated as an investment because of problems in finding a "clear criteria for delineating [R&D] from other activities".

    This paper examines whether the use of the OECD Frascati definition is adequate for this purpose. It argues that it is too narrow and that attempts to modify the National Accounts would not be well served by its adoption. In particular, it argues that the appropriate concept of R&D that is required for the Accounts should incorporate a broad range of science-based innovation costs and that this broader R&D concept is amenable to measurement.

    Finally, the paper argues that failing to move in the direction of an expanded definition of R&D capital will have consequences for comparisons of Canadian GDP to that of other countries - in particular, our largest trading partner, the United States. It would provide a biased estimate of Canada's GDP relative to the United States. If all science-based innovation expenditures are to be capitalized, GDP will increase. But it appears that Canada's innovation system is directed more towards non-R&D science-based expenditures than the innovation systems of many other countries. If Canada were to only capitalize the narrow Frascati definition of R&D expenditures and not a broader class of science-based innovation expenditures, we would significantly bias estimates of Canadian GDP relative to those for other countries, such as the United States, whose innovation systems concentrate more on traditional R&D expenditures.

    Release date: 2005-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005010
    Description:

    This paper tracks the growth and decline of information and communications technology (ICT) industries that were synonymous with the so-called new economy boom of the late-1990s and its subsequent bust period in the early 2000s. The analysis focuses on the question of whether the ICT bust has been accompanied by a structural shift illustrated by less firm turnover. It shows that to date there is little evidence of a structural shift. Entry rates of new establishments within the ICT sector were above those of other sectors within the economy during both the ICT boom and bust. This is evidence that both firms and entrepreneurs continued to see opportunities to develop new products and markets even during a time of retrenchment. The location of the ICT sector also show little evidence of a change.

    Release date: 2005-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017769
    Description:

    The two most commonly used measures of R&D intensity are R&D spending as a percentage of total revenue, commonly applied at the firm level, and R&D spending as a percentage of value-added, when measuring R&D in the total economy. This article highlights the interval 1997 to 2002, a period for which consistent data are available, to compare the two measures.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017770
    Description:

    A vast majority of the technology generated by federal research is destined to regulatory and stewardship applications. Some of it does have commercial applications and is licensed to the private sector. This article presents revised data and details by department.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017771
    Description:

    Preliminary data indicate the biotechnology sector continued its phenomenal growth in Canada between 2001 and 2003, generating almost $4 billion in revenues. Biotechnology companies have more than quadrupled their revenues since 1997, making biotech a quickly growing activity.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017767
    Description:

    While Statistics Canada has been measuring certain aspects of commercialization for a long time, the current usage of the word is challenging the statistical system. Universities and federal labs sometimes commercialize their technologies and we measure their license revenues and spin-off firms. In the private sector, commercialization is called "survival". How do we provide a framework and indicators of "everything"?

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050017768
    Description:

    This article presents data on nanotechnology firms from two perspectives. The first is the number and distribution of firms engaged in research and development of nanotechnologies. The second perspective examines companies providing services to nanotechnology firms. These data contribute to an emerging understanding of the level of nanotechnology activity in the business sector of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2005-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

Reference (24)

Reference (24) (24 of 24 results)

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