Statistics by subject – Science and technology

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (22)

All (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2007006
    Description:

    This descriptive working paper provides highlights from the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey 2005. Data on innovative biotechnology firms are presented by region, sectors and firm size. The data include firm revenues, R&D activities, human resources, firm financing, age of firms, country of control and the proportion of publicly traded firms.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2007005
    Description:

    This working paper provides results from a pilot survey on nanotechnology, which was appended to the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey 2005. The paper presents the conceptual issues and survey challenges relating to measurement of nanotechnology-related activities, as well as preliminary data on nanotechnology firms in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-08-31

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005010
    Description:

    This paper looks into Canadian innovative biotechnology firms' access to financing capital. Results show that over 70% of biotech firms that attempted to raise financing capital were successful. Funds were primarily sought for R&D activities and came primarily from Canadian venture capitalists. Harsher market conditions were the main reasons put forward by investors to limit or reject biotechnology firms' funding requests.

    Release date: 2005-04-29

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005009
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2003 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the number of employees with biotechnology-related responsibilities that remained stable, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 375 in 2001 to 490 in 2003 and biotechnology revenues rose from $3.6 billion to $3.8 billion between 2001 and 2003. Also, biotechnology R&D spending increased by 11% between 2001 and 2003 and the amount of capital raised for biotechnology was up 73% during this period.

    Release date: 2005-04-27

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004017
    Description:

    Using data from the 1997 Biotechnology Firm Survey and the 1999 and 2001 cycles of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey, this article portrays the evolution of key indicators of Canadian biotechnology companies from 1997 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-10-22

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004006
    Description:

    Biotechnology is a pervasive technology used in several industrial sectors, making collecting sound data a real challenge. This paper describes the methodology of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Some of the specific issues dealt with are the definitions of biotechnology and innovative biotechnology firms, the target population, sampling, data collection procedures, and data quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003003
    Description:

    Results show that biotechnology companies in Canada are experiencing rapid growth and that Statistics Canada is now capturing more biotechnology activity. For example, between 1997 and 1999, Canadian biotechnology firms grew in number with core biotechnology firms increasing from 282 firms to 358. They brought in $1.9 billion in biotechnology revenues in 1999, compared with $813 million in 1997; they spent around $827 million on biotechnology research and development in 1999, compared with $494 million in 1997.

    Release date: 2003-03-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002003
    Description:

    This is the final of three papers providing data and an overview of the results of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999. Readers are encouraged to use the data. The next edition of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 2001 is expected to be administered in the spring of 2002 with results available early in 2003.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002004
    Description:

    Spin-off firms made up over 34% of the core group of firms from the 1999 biotechnology survey. They also made up over 112 of the 270 small (under 50 employees) size firms, by far the largest group of core biotechnology, and half of the human health related firms, the largest sector of biotechnology firms. Central to this paper is the question: What are the general characteristics of this sub-group of core biotechnology firms?

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001012
    Description:

    As of 1997, Canadian biotech industry was made of 282 core firms. Of these, 214 were small firms with less than 50 employees, 37 were medium firms with 51 to 150 employees, and 31 were large firms with over 150 employees. They earned $813 million from biotech products sales, $311 million of which were from exports. They employed 9,000 people in biotech related activities and had 8,924 products at all stages of development. Private placements, venture capital and labour sponsored funds were these firms main sources of financing capital. Access to capital was the most serious obstacle faced by the biotech firms in 1997. Marketing and distribution were their major reasons for entertaining strategic alliances, while universities were their most preferred R&D partners.

    Release date: 2001-09-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001011
    Description:

    This paper provides a summary of the strategies and business practices of biotechnology firms, and information on the business environment faced by these firms. These issues, considered in conjunction with information on revenue, research and development, import and export, product pipeline and human resources characteristics of biotechnology firms, contribute to a more comprehensive portrait of the biotechnology sector in Canada.

    Release date: 2001-08-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001007
    Description:

    This paper provides estimates for firms actively involved in the development of new products and processes using biotechnologies. The survey examines the use of biotechnology and the development of biotechnologies in Canada's industrial sector for the 1999 fiscal year. The Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999 was conducted as part of a project to develop biotechnology statistics and was funded under the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy. Several departments and agencies provided important inputs at various stages of the survey. They are Industry Canada, the Canadian Biotechnology Secretariat, Agriculture Canada, the National Research Council, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Health Canada, and Environment Canada.

    Release date: 2001-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M2001009
    Description:

    This paper examines the call for an international effort to co-ordinate the measuring of biotechnology so that the ensuing statistics and indicators maintain some level of international comparability.

    Release date: 2001-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M2000008
    Description:

    This report examines the factors contributing to the rapid growth of a small number of biotechnology firms in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-08-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M1999006
    Description:

    This report describes the basic characteristics of the firms using biotechnologies, the type of use of biotechnologies, the stage of use and future use, the obstacles to acquisition and implementation of biotechnologies, the advantages obtained, and internal and external sources of information leading to biotechnology use.

    Release date: 1999-11-19

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1998005
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) (3 results)

Reference (16)

Reference (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2007007
    Description:

    Results from the Survey of Innovation 2003 raised some interesting questions. First, an unexpected one-third of establishments in R&D services were not innovative. According to the guidelines of the Oslo Manual, innovative establishments are those that introduced a new or significantly improved product or process on to the market or into production, within a specified interval. Second, many of these non-innovative establishments indicated that satisfying existing customers was irrelevant to their firms success. This was very different response from all other types of firms.

    This working paper provides a potential explanation of these unexpected results, as well as an overview of available information on establishments in R&D services (NAICS 5417) in the context of professional services generally. The paper assembles descriptive data to show that non-innovative establishments in R&D services differ significantly from other non-innovative establishments and, while not innovative, they are nevertheless highly inventive. It presents some evidence to suggest that they are venture firms (firms relying on infusions of investment capital rather than revenues from sales to sustain their operations) and proposes a specific set of indicators that would facilitate resolution of the nature of firms in this industry group.

    Release date: 2007-12-20

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2007006
    Description:

    This descriptive working paper provides highlights from the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey 2005. Data on innovative biotechnology firms are presented by region, sectors and firm size. The data include firm revenues, R&D activities, human resources, firm financing, age of firms, country of control and the proportion of publicly traded firms.

    Release date: 2007-12-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2007005
    Description:

    This working paper provides results from a pilot survey on nanotechnology, which was appended to the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey 2005. The paper presents the conceptual issues and survey challenges relating to measurement of nanotechnology-related activities, as well as preliminary data on nanotechnology firms in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-08-31

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005010
    Description:

    This paper looks into Canadian innovative biotechnology firms' access to financing capital. Results show that over 70% of biotech firms that attempted to raise financing capital were successful. Funds were primarily sought for R&D activities and came primarily from Canadian venture capitalists. Harsher market conditions were the main reasons put forward by investors to limit or reject biotechnology firms' funding requests.

    Release date: 2005-04-29

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005009
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2003 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the number of employees with biotechnology-related responsibilities that remained stable, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 375 in 2001 to 490 in 2003 and biotechnology revenues rose from $3.6 billion to $3.8 billion between 2001 and 2003. Also, biotechnology R&D spending increased by 11% between 2001 and 2003 and the amount of capital raised for biotechnology was up 73% during this period.

    Release date: 2005-04-27

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004017
    Description:

    Using data from the 1997 Biotechnology Firm Survey and the 1999 and 2001 cycles of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey, this article portrays the evolution of key indicators of Canadian biotechnology companies from 1997 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-10-22

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2004006
    Description:

    Biotechnology is a pervasive technology used in several industrial sectors, making collecting sound data a real challenge. This paper describes the methodology of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Some of the specific issues dealt with are the definitions of biotechnology and innovative biotechnology firms, the target population, sampling, data collection procedures, and data quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003005
    Description:

    The main indicators of biotechnology activities in Canada are presented in this article. The data are from the 2001 Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Within the last few years, except for the amount of financing capital raised, an increase in all the indicators was noticed. For example, the number of innovative firms involved in biotechnology activities rose from 358 in 1999 to 375 in 2001. The Human Health sector outpaces all the other sectors in terms of the number of firms, human resources, biotechnology revenues, biotechnology research and development expenditures, amount of financing capital raised, and the number of products in the pipeline. Contrary to medium-sized and large firms where the personnel is more homogenous, small firms employ mostly highly-qualified workers. The 2001 data show a maturing trend in small firms. Most firms could not hire enough people to fill all their vacancies (estimated at 953 positions in Canada) for the 2001 year.

    Release date: 2003-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003003
    Description:

    Results show that biotechnology companies in Canada are experiencing rapid growth and that Statistics Canada is now capturing more biotechnology activity. For example, between 1997 and 1999, Canadian biotechnology firms grew in number with core biotechnology firms increasing from 282 firms to 358. They brought in $1.9 billion in biotechnology revenues in 1999, compared with $813 million in 1997; they spent around $827 million on biotechnology research and development in 1999, compared with $494 million in 1997.

    Release date: 2003-03-10

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002003
    Description:

    This is the final of three papers providing data and an overview of the results of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999. Readers are encouraged to use the data. The next edition of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 2001 is expected to be administered in the spring of 2002 with results available early in 2003.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2002004
    Description:

    Spin-off firms made up over 34% of the core group of firms from the 1999 biotechnology survey. They also made up over 112 of the 270 small (under 50 employees) size firms, by far the largest group of core biotechnology, and half of the human health related firms, the largest sector of biotechnology firms. Central to this paper is the question: What are the general characteristics of this sub-group of core biotechnology firms?

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001012
    Description:

    As of 1997, Canadian biotech industry was made of 282 core firms. Of these, 214 were small firms with less than 50 employees, 37 were medium firms with 51 to 150 employees, and 31 were large firms with over 150 employees. They earned $813 million from biotech products sales, $311 million of which were from exports. They employed 9,000 people in biotech related activities and had 8,924 products at all stages of development. Private placements, venture capital and labour sponsored funds were these firms main sources of financing capital. Access to capital was the most serious obstacle faced by the biotech firms in 1997. Marketing and distribution were their major reasons for entertaining strategic alliances, while universities were their most preferred R&D partners.

    Release date: 2001-09-25

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001011
    Description:

    This paper provides a summary of the strategies and business practices of biotechnology firms, and information on the business environment faced by these firms. These issues, considered in conjunction with information on revenue, research and development, import and export, product pipeline and human resources characteristics of biotechnology firms, contribute to a more comprehensive portrait of the biotechnology sector in Canada.

    Release date: 2001-08-28

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2001007
    Description:

    This paper provides estimates for firms actively involved in the development of new products and processes using biotechnologies. The survey examines the use of biotechnology and the development of biotechnologies in Canada's industrial sector for the 1999 fiscal year. The Biotechnology Use and Development Survey - 1999 was conducted as part of a project to develop biotechnology statistics and was funded under the Canadian Biotechnology Strategy. Several departments and agencies provided important inputs at various stages of the survey. They are Industry Canada, the Canadian Biotechnology Secretariat, Agriculture Canada, the National Research Council, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, Natural Resources Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Health Canada, and Environment Canada.

    Release date: 2001-03-30

  • Technical products: 88F0006X1998005
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in the "Information System for Science and Technology Project" to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents data tabulations taken from regular surveys on research and development (R&D) and S&T and made possible by the project.

    Release date: 1998-10-30

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: