Statistics by subject – Housing and living arrangements

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All (32) (25 of 32 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114316
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity and geographic region.

    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Table: 98-312-X201100311705
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000211122
    Description:

    A look how age, income and family structure affects homeownership over time.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

  • Public use microdata: 12M0021X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for the 21st cycle (2007) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. Cycle 21 of the GSS collected data from persons aged 45 years and over living in private households in the 10 provinces of Canada. The survey covered a wide range of topics such as well-being, family composition, retirement decisions and plans, care giving and care receiving experiences, social networks and housing.

    Release date: 2009-05-04

  • Table: 89-633-X
    Description:

    Cycle 21 of the 2007 General Social Survey (GSS) was on "Family, Social Support and Retirement". Data were collected over a 9 month period from March to December 2007 with a sample of approximately 25,000 respondents representing the non-institutionalized population in the 10 provinces. These tables contain data on the prevalence of care given and received by seniors because of long-term health problems, selected employment consequences of providing care to seniors and self-rated stress experienced by caregivers. All tables are available by sex and age groups, and for Canada and the provinces or regions.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Table: 97-554-X2006002
    Description:

    These data tables present 2006 Census highlights on housing and shelter costs. The tables present data on the condition of dwelling, number of persons per room and tenure. They also display data on housing affordability for owners and renters.

    Available on the official day of release, they present information highlights via key indicators such as 2006 counts, percentage change (2001 to 2006) and percent distribution (2006), for various levels of geography. The tables also allow users to perform simple rank and sort functions.

    Release date: 2008-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049497
    Description:

    The proportion of Canadians receiving governmentsubsidized home care was almost stable between 1994/95 and 2003, rising only slightly from 2.5% to 2.7%. Over that period, the average age of people receiving this type of care fell from just under 65 to 62. Among people who needed help with personal care, the proportion receiving government-subsidized home care fell from one-half to one-third. In 1994/95, 8% of recipients of government-subsidized home care were incontinent; by 2003, the proportion had more than doubled to 17%.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006046
    Description:

    This study analyzes the impact of widowhood on income, as well as changes in the low-income rate and the sources of income among women and men 65 years of age and over, who became widowed at any point between 1993 and 2003. The source of data is Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2006-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410713124
    Description:

    This article examines housing costs within the context of income and assets, focusing on elderly homeowners but including younger families and renters for comparison. The low-income dimension is also explored.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004015
    Description:

    This article analyses the impact of widowhood on income, as well as changes in the low-income rate and the sources of income, among women 65 years of age and over, between 1990 and 2001, using data from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2004-07-22

Data (8)

Data (8) (8 of 8 results)

Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114316
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada examines many aspects related to senior women in Canada including their socio-demographic characteristics, life expectancy, living arrangements, social participation, Internet use, health, assistance with daily living and leading causes of death, as well as economic characteristics including their labour force participation and income. The focus will be on recent patterns, with discussion of historical trends where appropriate, including selected analysis by ethnocultural diversity and geographic region.

    Release date: 2016-03-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114154
    Description:

    Even though most grandparents live in separate households from their adult children and grandchildren, sometimes the grandparent and grandchild generations live together. This paper provides information on the number of grandparents who are in this particular situation, along with their living arrangements and their ethnocultural and sociodemographic characteristics.

    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114142
    Description:

    This article provides information on the care provided by caregivers to seniors with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. It focuses on how the intensity and nature of the care vary depending on seniors’ type of housing. Four types of housing are examined: care facilities, supportive housing, private households separate from the caregiver, and private households shared with the caregiver.

    Release date: 2015-02-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400111904
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Census of Population and 2011 General Social Survey in order to examine the conjugal histories and living arrangements for current seniors, defined as individuals aged at least 65, and "future seniors", defined as individuals aged 55 to 64.

    Release date: 2014-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000211122
    Description:

    A look how age, income and family structure affects homeownership over time.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050049497
    Description:

    The proportion of Canadians receiving governmentsubsidized home care was almost stable between 1994/95 and 2003, rising only slightly from 2.5% to 2.7%. Over that period, the average age of people receiving this type of care fell from just under 65 to 62. Among people who needed help with personal care, the proportion receiving government-subsidized home care fell from one-half to one-third. In 1994/95, 8% of recipients of government-subsidized home care were incontinent; by 2003, the proportion had more than doubled to 17%.

    Release date: 2006-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006046
    Description:

    This study analyzes the impact of widowhood on income, as well as changes in the low-income rate and the sources of income among women and men 65 years of age and over, who became widowed at any point between 1993 and 2003. The source of data is Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2006-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038969
    Description:

    The housing transition patterns of seniors had been the focus of some attention in 2004 against a backdrop of concerns about the dwindling demand for rental properties. This article takes a closer look at seniors who downsize, those who upsize and others who move for lifestyle reasons. It identifies the characteristics of senior movers, the life events associated with their move, and the various types of housing transitions they made.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047776
    Description:

    The years leading up to retirement may confront people with new challenges as well as opportunities. In addition to health, finances and several other factors, family relationships in general and satisfaction with marriage in particular greatly influence couples' experience of these years.

    This article uses data from the 2001 and 1995 General Social Surveys (GSS) to examine older couples' (aged 50 to 74 years) perceptions of their relationship during retirement or the years leading to retirement. Specifically, the analysis looks at couples' employment or retirement status, each individual's relative contribution to household income and the presence of adult children in the home as they relate to the quality of their relationship.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410713124
    Description:

    This article examines housing costs within the context of income and assets, focusing on elderly homeowners but including younger families and renters for comparison. The low-income dimension is also explored.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004015
    Description:

    This article analyses the impact of widowhood on income, as well as changes in the low-income rate and the sources of income, among women 65 years of age and over, between 1990 and 2001, using data from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2004-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016552
    Description:

    This article looks at 'living apart together' (LAT) relationships where unmarried couples who live in separate residences maintain an intimate relationship.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001008
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of seniors in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-569-X19990014851
    Description:

    This chapter aims at using a generational approach to describe the lifestyle of the elderly in the early 1990s. Individuals observed for the purpose of this chapter were born between 1920 and 1936, approximately corresponding to parents of baby boomers. Beyond the positive relationship between the likelihood of institutionalization and an individual's age, marital status also appeared to play a key role. The marked difference between men's and women's life expectancies in private households, combined with a declining propensity of women to remarry after being widowed or divorced, have made elderly women twice as likely to live alone as men. The private households in which the elderly live are most often small, unigenerational family homes. When the household extends beyond this framework, disparities between men and women begin to appear. A man is more likely to cohabit with other generations if his wife was still part of the household. On the other hand, single women are more likely to live alone or with persons to whom they were not related. Women over 65 living within multigenerational households had a greater completed fertility rate than those living in unigenerational households. The fact that mothers of baby boomers are likely to have had a relatively large number of children is thus reassuring concerning their future access to informal support networks. However, we should observe other phenomena that could influence the establishment of informal networks, especially divorce - the increase of which among baby boomers could have a major impact.

    Release date: 1999-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014573
    Description:

    This article examines some of the characteristics that appear to predispose widowed women to live on their own, with particular emphasis on the extent of their contact with family and friends.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014575
    Description:

    This article looks at three-generation households.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998115
    Description:

    Older immigrants arriving in Canada are not eligible for government transfer payments or welfare benefits for up to 10 years. Consequently, many of them choose to live with their relatives or sponsors in crowded three or more generation households. Cultural preferences also influence this tendency. The propensity for immigrant groups from developing regions to live in three or more generation households ranges up to 18 times those of their Canadian-born and the immigrant counterparts from the developed regions. The average income, percent receiving Old Age Security payments, percent widowed and duration of residence in Canada are significantly associated with proportions of immigrants living in such arrangements, and explain about 84% of birthplace variation for males and 81% for females.

    Release date: 1998-09-23

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11-522-X19990015676
    Description:

    As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Policy analysts continue to search for alternative, less costly forms of care for the elderly and have attempted to develop programs to delay or prevent nursing-home entry. Health care administrators required information for planning the future demand for nursing-home services. This study assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics in predicting and understanding nursing-home entry.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

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