Statistics by subject – Income, pensions and wealth

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-004-M
    Description:

    The papers in this series cover a variety of topics related to labour statistics. The studies are intended to show recent or historical trends observed with the surveys produced by the Labour statistics Division, i.e. the Labour Force Survey, Survey of Employment Payrolls and Hours, Employment insurance coverage Survey, survey on Employment insurance statistics as well as administrative data sources. All the papers in this analytical series go through institutional and peer review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate as a government statistical agency and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.

    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114134
    Description:

    This study compares the wealth holdings of family units covered by workplace pension plans with those of other family units. It focuses on families and unattached individuals who had no significant business equity and whose major income recipient was aged 30 to 54 and employed as a paid worker. The paper also examines whether wealth differences observed between families with registered pension plan (RPP) assets and other families persist when key sociodemographic differences between the two populations are taken into account.

    Release date: 2015-01-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014355
    Description:

    This study documents the prevalence and nature of re-employment among workers who left long-term jobs in paid employment at age 50 or older. The analysis is based on a 28-year administrative panel dataset, the Longitudinal Worker File, capitalizing on its large sample size and detailed information on mobility across employers. The study examines the prevalence, time and covariates of re-employment as a paid employee and in unincorporated self-employment; the nature of paid re-employment, including job duration, mobility across industry and firm size; the distribution of average earnings in re-employment compared with the long-term job; and the covariates of low and high relative earnings in re-employment.

    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013352
    Description:

    With the leading edge of the baby boom generation now in their mid-sixties, there is considerable interest in how and when these individuals will retire. To help place this issue in a broader context, this paper provides information on the employment histories of individuals who were aged 33 to 38 in 1983 and aged 60 to 65 in 2010.

    The longest observed duration of employment is used as an organizing framework, with summary measures presented on indicators such as years of employment, job turnover, annual and cumulative earnings, permanent and temporary layoffs, and years of pensionable service. Cohort members are loosely categorized as 'marginally attached workers', 'mobile workers', or 'long-term-job holders' according to their employment characteristics, with about one-tenth, one-quarter, and two-thirds of cohort members in these groups, respectively.

    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2013029
    Description:

    Population aging and the recent global financial crisis underscore the importance of the discussions of the adequacy of retirement preparation in Canada and the soundness of the Canadian retirement income system. The focus of this study is to examine whether the accumulated private savings of Canadian households is adequate for their retirement, given their expected entitlement to public and private pension when they retire.

    Release date: 2013-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012014
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the most recent statistical developments relating to the financial well-being of retirees. This summary is based on selected research done at Statistics Canada on the contribution of income, consumption, and financial wealth to the well-being of older Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012010
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines the income replacement rates achieved in old age by Canadians who experienced marital dissolution, through either widowhood or divorce, after age 55. It is based on results published in the research paper Income Replacement Rates Among Canadian Seniors: The Effect of Widowhood and Divorce.

    Release date: 2012-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2012343
    Description:

    The financial security of widowed and divorced women during their retirement years has long been a concern. This paper places this issue within the context of research on replacement rates, the extent to which family income during the working years (here, the mid-50s) is "replaced" as individuals move into their late 70s. Using a longitudinal database and fixed-effects econometric models, the paper assesses the effect of widowhood/widowerhood and divorce after age 55 on replacement rates during the retirement years.

    Release date: 2012-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011074
    Description:

    Discussions of pension adequacy for elderly Canadians have used the rate at which income falls with age; the income replacement rate or the ratio of post-retirement income to pre-retirement income. Use of income streams to assess post-retirement welfare requires a standard against which adequacy of the replacement rates can be judged. Because some expenditures (for example, work-related expenses) can be expected to fall after retirement, a declining income stream does not necessarily signal financial problems for seniors. More importantly, income as normally measured captures only part of what is available to seniors if households possess assets, which in retirement are not being used to generate measured income.

    This paper uses a different metric, referred to as "potential" income. Potential income is the sum of realized income and the income that could be realized from owned assets such as mutual funds and housing. Households prepare for retirement by saving and borrowing and investing the proceeds. The assets accumulated over a lifetime may or may not be drawn down in later years. If they are not, income streams underestimate the "potential" income available to support retirement. This paper takes this potential into account when comparing the pre- and post-retirement financial status of Canadian households.

    Release date: 2011-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011335
    Description:

    In this study, the income management strategies of Canadian couples are examined using data from the 2007 General Social Survey. The extent to which "older" couples, in which at least one spouse or partner is aged 45 or older, employ an allocative, pooled, or separate strategy is explored. Results show that the income management strategies used by these couples are correlated with relationship characteristics, such as common-law status, duration of relationship, and the presence of children. As well, the likelihood of using a separate approach is positively correlated with levels of educational attainment and with the amount of income received by wives or female partners.

    Release date: 2011-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211455
    Description:

    Some households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these interhousehold transfers add up to a sizeable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, voluntary interhousehold transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income. This article examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary interhousehold transfers, and provides a profile of voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada. It uses recent data on interhousehold transfers from income, expenditure and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211428
    Description:

    It is often assumed that over the life course most older workers will pay off their debts and save for retirement. However, research from the United States suggests that an increasing number of seniors who are in pre-retirement or are retired are now struggling with debt. This article uses the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to look at the proportion, type and level of debt among Canadian retirees age 55 and over. It examines the socio-economic and demographic factors influencing the likelihood of carrying any debt in retirement. The financial circumstances of indebted retirees are also examined, including three indicators of financial security.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111431
    Description:

    Over the last two decades, the bankruptcy rate in Canada has been trending upwards, regardless of changing economic conditions; the age of people filing for bankruptcy has also been rising. Using the 2007 General Social Survey, this article identifies pre-retirees aged 45 to 64 who have experienced a bankruptcy and examines how they are preparing for retirement.

    Release date: 2011-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010066
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending and from its predecessor, the Survey of Family Expenditures, this paper investigates the relative incomes of retirement-age and working-age Canadians from 1969 to 2006, taking into account both explicit household income and the implicit income generated by owner-occupied housing. Over this 37-year period, the explicit incomes of retirement-age households increased at a more rapid pace than those of working-age households. Implicit income from owner-occupied housing also increased rapidly during this time, matching the rate at which the explicit income of retirement-age households increased. On average, this implicit source of earnings raised the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over) by 16%. Taking both forms of income into account, the incomes of retirement-age households (aged 70 and over), relative to the incomes of working-age households (aged 40 to 49), increased from 45% in 1969 to 59% in 2006. During this period, Canadians invested in housing assets that provided additional income upon retirement.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010325
    Description:

    Homeownership affects investment, consumption, and savings decisions of households, and plays a major role in post-retirement well-being. This paper examines two questions. First, to what extent do Canadians acquire and retain homeownership at different life-course stages, particularly after retirement? Second, has the age profile of homeownership changed over generations?

    Using data from eight Canadian censuses of population, conducted between 1971 and 2006, we find a strong regularity in the age profile of homeownership across generations of Canadians. The homeownership rate rises quickly with the age of household maintainers (i.e., the person(s) who pay(s) for shelter costs) in the period before the age of 40, and continues to climb thereafter at a slower pace until reaching the plateau near age 65, when about three quarters of Canadian households own their homes. We find that the homeownership rate changes little from age 65 to 74 but starts declining after age 75. As well, we note that the level at which homeownership plateaus has risen steadily across birth cohorts since the 1970s.

    Release date: 2010-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111133
    Description:

    This Economic Fact Sheet provides data on the labour market, hourly wages, pension coverage and registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) for women and men.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901111022
    Description:

    New data from the Pension Satellite Account show there have been several notable shifts so far this decade in the structure of pension assets. Assets have nearly quadrupled, mostly due to higher investment income. Contributions rose steadily, but barely kept up with the increase in withdrawals as the population aged rapidly.

    Release date: 2009-11-12

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5013
    Release date: 2017-06-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M
    Description:

    The papers in this series are based on the Survey of Financial Security which is a study of what families own (assets) and what they owe (debts). Various topics are covered by this survey, such as the value of family assets (home; other property; vehicles; bank accounts; term deposits; life insurance; and investments in registered savings plans, bonds, mutual funds, stocks, etc.), the amount of family debts (amount owed on mortgages, car loans, credit cards, other charge accounts, student loans, etc.), major on-going expenses for housing and child care, and any employer pensions plans that members of the family belong to. Information is also available on the demographic, employment, income and educational characteristics of family members. This research paper series covers various topics relating to survey content, concepts and operations.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This document presents the results of the Pension Plans in Canada Survey as of January 1, 2003. It gives a brief overview of changes over time in the participation of men and women in registered pension plans, the coverage of the labour force by these plans, membership in defined benefit and defined contribution plans, and total contributions paid into these plans. The document also briefly describes retirement compensation arrangements with an analysis covering the period 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-09-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2000001
    Description:

    The intent of this document is to provide an inventory of the surveys, databases, publications, articles and work in progress in Statistics Canada that relate to Canada's retirement income programs. The inventory provides information on publications, output and relevant data elements produced by the surveys and databases. It does not provide an exhaustive description of these data sources, but instead focuses on the information that can be used for purposes of researching/analysing retirement income programs. Some of the information contained does not specifically relate to these programs but might be used as a secondary source when doing research in this area.

    Release date: 2000-03-06

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