Statistics by subject – Work and retirement

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114826
    Description:

    Since 2007—prior to the economic downturn of 2008/2009—the overall labour force participation of Canadians declined by about two percentage points. The first part of the study investigates the extent to which aging affected changes in labour market participation rates since 2007, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). In the second part, the reasons behind the increase in the participation rates of Canadians aged 55 and over, which have been trending upwards since 1996, are explored.

    Release date: 2017-06-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114360
    Description:

    Using data from the 2014 Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS), this article examines the extent to which individuals in the labour force are preparing for retirement and provides another perspective on the relationship between financial literacy and retirement planning.

    Release date: 2016-03-23

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015371
    Description:

    This paper investigates whether registered pension plans (RPPs) help households prepare financially for retirement or simply substitute for other forms of private saving. This issue is addressed using a panel of 1.8 million Canadian households, from 1991 to 2010, which appear in the Longitudinal Administrative Databank. The analysis controls for correlations in savings across accounts due to unobserved tastes for saving by exploiting the fact that employer contribution rates increase discontinuously on earnings above the average industrial wage, a unique feature of occupational pensions in Canada, the effect being estimated in a Regression Kink Design.

    Release date: 2015-12-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114155
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD), this study examines whether the expected retirement age varies according to the unemployment rate of the economic region. In addition, the study verifies if the relationship between the unemployment rate of the economic region and the probability of permanent retirement remains when other factors are accounted for.

    Release date: 2015-04-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014355
    Description:

    This study documents the prevalence and nature of re-employment among workers who left long-term jobs in paid employment at age 50 or older. The analysis is based on a 28-year administrative panel dataset, the Longitudinal Worker File, capitalizing on its large sample size and detailed information on mobility across employers. The study examines the prevalence, time and covariates of re-employment as a paid employee and in unincorporated self-employment; the nature of paid re-employment, including job duration, mobility across industry and firm size; the distribution of average earnings in re-employment compared with the long-term job; and the covariates of low and high relative earnings in re-employment.

    Release date: 2014-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2013352
    Description:

    With the leading edge of the baby boom generation now in their mid-sixties, there is considerable interest in how and when these individuals will retire. To help place this issue in a broader context, this paper provides information on the employment histories of individuals who were aged 33 to 38 in 1983 and aged 60 to 65 in 2010.

    The longest observed duration of employment is used as an organizing framework, with summary measures presented on indicators such as years of employment, job turnover, annual and cumulative earnings, permanent and temporary layoffs, and years of pensionable service. Cohort members are loosely categorized as 'marginally attached workers', 'mobile workers', or 'long-term-job holders' according to their employment characteristics, with about one-tenth, one-quarter, and two-thirds of cohort members in these groups, respectively.

    Release date: 2013-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2013029
    Description:

    Population aging and the recent global financial crisis underscore the importance of the discussions of the adequacy of retirement preparation in Canada and the soundness of the Canadian retirement income system. The focus of this study is to examine whether the accumulated private savings of Canadian households is adequate for their retirement, given their expected entitlement to public and private pension when they retire.

    Release date: 2013-06-14

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2012001
    Description:

    This article uses the concept of expected working life, developed in a previous article, and expands it to include involuntary retirements based on certain scenarios. We also examine the effect of level of education on expected working life.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201200111750
    Description:

    This article provides estimates of the expected working life and post-retirement life-expectancy of workers when they reach 50 years of age. Estimates for various educational attainment categories are also provided, by taking both voluntary and involuntary retirements into account.

    Release date: 2012-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012014
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the most recent statistical developments relating to the financial well-being of retirees. This summary is based on selected research done at Statistics Canada on the contribution of income, consumption, and financial wealth to the well-being of older Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-08-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200311698
    Description:

    This article examines the job-search behaviour of the older unemployed by comparing it with that of their younger counterparts, using data from the Employment Insurance Coverage Survey from 2006 to 2010. It looks at age differences in the number of hours spent looking for work and the methods used. It also examines two aspects that may affect the probability of finding a job quickly - looking for work outside one's community and the willingness of the unemployed to accept job offers with a lower wage than in the previous job. Lastly, it examines the level of optimism of the older unemployed about their chances of finding an acceptable job quickly, as well as what, in their view, would help them most in their efforts.

    Release date: 2012-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2012001
    Description:

    In rural and small town areas, self-employed individuals generally operate small(er) enterprises. Most are unincorporated but some are incorporated. These small(er) self-employment enterprises typically provide important services in rural and small town areas. Examples range from general stores to hair styling salons to plumbing and electrician enterprises to dentists.This bulletin analyzes the relative importance of each of these self-employment businesses in rural and small town Canada. It examines the age structure of self-employed workers to determine whether there is an impending surge of retirements among the rural self-employed.

    Release date: 2012-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111431
    Description:

    Over the last two decades, the bankruptcy rate in Canada has been trending upwards, regardless of changing economic conditions; the age of people filing for bankruptcy has also been rising. Using the 2007 General Social Survey, this article identifies pre-retirees aged 45 to 64 who have experienced a bankruptcy and examines how they are preparing for retirement.

    Release date: 2011-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011067
    Description:

    Studies of pre- and post-retirement annual income have focused on the extent to which income falls at this crucial stage in life. Although these studies vary in scope and intent, the overall consensus is that the Canadian retirement income system provides income replacement rates that are in the excess of 60% to 70% for a plurality of Canadians, especially for those who had low incomes during their prime working years. However, little has been published on the extent to which retirees maintain their same levels of consumption. Using data from the Survey of Family Expenditures (FAMEX) and from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this study develops a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by individuals in their late 40s (in the early 1980s) differ from those of a group of households headed by individuals in their early 70s (in the late 2000s). It finds that, even though the nature of consumption changes over time, the overall levels of consumption "per adult" do not decline by substantial amounts among Canadians as they age.

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111400
    Description:

    A substantial proportion of working seniors are self-employed. This article uses census data to study self-employment among senior men and women. Trends in self-employment rates and categories are presented, along with occupational and industrial profiles. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with self-employment.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111402
    Description:

    This study examines four distinct states of retirement among older Canadians: fully retired; partially retired; previously retired but returned to work; and never retired. Using the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Healthy Aging, it presents the socio-economic characteristics of each group, and discusses their differing work patterns and health.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010713253
    Description:

    Most Canadians retire by the age of 65. Some, however, continue to work well into their senior years. This article uses census data to study labour market activity among senior men and women. Trends in seniors employment rates and occupational and industrial profiles are outlined. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with employment and work intensity.

    Release date: 2010-09-21

Reference (6)

Reference (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Index and guides: 98-200-X2016027
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series presents a detailed profile of working seniors in Canada. It includes information on the work activity levels, sources of income and occupations of senior men and women. Trends over the past two decades are examined.

    Release date: 2017-11-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • Technical products: 75-512-X
    Description:

    This book provides technical documentation of variables, methodologies and extended lists of references used in developing the research findings reported in "New Frontiers of Research on Retirement". It will be used around the world by researchers and teachers, as well as by students preparing theses related to patterns of transition to retirement. This documentation is important because a large part of book is devoted to scientific papers that are based upon Statistics Canada's data and which require substantial innovations of useful concepts and data.

    Release date: 2008-09-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This document presents the results of the Pension Plans in Canada Survey as of January 1, 2003. It gives a brief overview of changes over time in the participation of men and women in registered pension plans, the coverage of the labour force by these plans, membership in defined benefit and defined contribution plans, and total contributions paid into these plans. The document also briefly describes retirement compensation arrangements with an analysis covering the period 1991 to 2001.

    Release date: 2004-09-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4500
    Release date: 1995-11-30

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