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All (10)

All (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111387
    Description:

    The Paid Work chapter of Women in Canada examines the labour market experiences of women and compares it to that of men. In particular, it compares the employment and unemployment trends by age for women and men. It also discusses how part-time work, multiple job holding, unionization, self-employment and the work experiences of mothers have changed over time.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310455
    Description:

    This article examines driving and commuting patterns from a gender perspective. Trip chaining, the practice of stopping at intermediate points during a journey, is analyzed using data from the 2005 Canadian Vehicle Survey. Next-stage destinations and the number of stops made while driving are compared for men and women.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046499
    Description:

    This article examines what happens to the time use of young people when they add a job to their daily schedule.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036007
    Description:

    This article examines the time use patterns of Canadians over the past decade, using data from the 1986, 1992 and 1998 General Social Surveys.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010015702
    Description:

    This article investigates whether enjoyment of paid work and household work influences our perception of quality of life.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035715
    Description:

    This study explores why female university students, who outnumber male students, remain underrepresented in several professions, including engineering.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1991004124
    Description:

    Women's RRSP savings soared during the 1980s. Why did so many more women contribute to RRSP during this time? Did changes in tax legislation stimulate the growth?

    Release date: 1991-12-02

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Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111387
    Description:

    The Paid Work chapter of Women in Canada examines the labour market experiences of women and compares it to that of men. In particular, it compares the employment and unemployment trends by age for women and men. It also discusses how part-time work, multiple job holding, unionization, self-employment and the work experiences of mothers have changed over time.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211345
    Description:

    This article uses the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey to examine how many people with disabilities receive help with activities of daily living; the type of daily activities with which they get help; and the care receiver's relationship to the person or persons who provide help with specific tasks. Then it explores how these relationships change as the severity of the care receiver's disability increases.

    Release date: 2010-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310455
    Description:

    This article examines driving and commuting patterns from a gender perspective. Trip chaining, the practice of stopping at intermediate points during a journey, is analyzed using data from the 2005 Canadian Vehicle Survey. Next-stage destinations and the number of stops made while driving are compared for men and women.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046499
    Description:

    This article examines what happens to the time use of young people when they add a job to their daily schedule.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036007
    Description:

    This article examines the time use patterns of Canadians over the past decade, using data from the 1986, 1992 and 1998 General Social Surveys.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010015702
    Description:

    This article investigates whether enjoyment of paid work and household work influences our perception of quality of life.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035715
    Description:

    This study explores why female university students, who outnumber male students, remain underrepresented in several professions, including engineering.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1991004124
    Description:

    Women's RRSP savings soared during the 1980s. Why did so many more women contribute to RRSP during this time? Did changes in tax legislation stimulate the growth?

    Release date: 1991-12-02

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