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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201500114147
    Description:

    Influential observations in logistic regression are those that have a notable effect on certain aspects of the model fit. Large sample size alone does not eliminate this concern; it is still important to examine potentially influential observations, especially in complex survey data. This paper describes a straightforward algorithm for examining potentially influential observations in complex survey data using SAS software. This algorithm was applied in a study using the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey that examined factors associated with family physician utilization for adolescents.

    Release date: 2015-03-25

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201400111901
    Description:

    This document is for analysts/researchers who are considering doing research with data from a survey where both survey weights and bootstrap weights are provided in the data files. This document gives directions, for some selected software packages, about how to get started in using survey weights and bootstrap weights for an analysis of survey data. We give brief directions for obtaining survey-weighted estimates, bootstrap variance estimates (and other desired error quantities) and some typical test statistics for each software package in turn. While these directions are provided just for the chosen examples, there will be information about the range of weighted and bootstrapped analyses that can be carried out by each software package.

    Release date: 2014-08-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111413
    Description:

    Many things influence how Canadians navigate their way through the many financial options and services available. One of the factors affecting the finances of individuals is their level of financial knowledge. This article uses the objective assessment (quiz) of financial knowledge that was asked as part of the Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) in 2009. It explores, for the first time in a national Canadian context, how personal financial knowledge is related to someone's socio-demographic characteristics and other financial behaviours such as having a budget or having investments.

    Release date: 2011-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111123
    Description:

    This article uses the 2004 General Social Survey on criminal victimization to explore how men and women of the core working age population (25 to 54 years) living in Census Metropolitan Areas differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. The results indicate that though men and women do not differ substantially in the amount of crime they perceive around them - they do differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. This difference remains unchanged even when other factors like fear of crime, income, age, and victimization experiences are taken into account.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211021
    Description:

    This article identifies factors that influence the social engagement of children with disabilities aged 5 to 14. The emphasis is put on participation in social activities outside the family home and normal school hours.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210891
    Description:

    More than four in ten Canadians reported a major change in their lives in the last twelve months. Using the 2008 General Social Survey on social networks, this article examines the types of change, their impact and how they are handled at various life stages. Results show that social networks, especially family, played an important role in dealing with change.

    Release date: 2009-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800110509
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this Juristat is intended to provide a profile of female offenders in Canada. Police-reported data are used to present information on the nature and extent of crime among female youth and adults in 2005 and then examine trends in the rate of female youth and adults charged by police with violent and property offences from 1986 to 2005. Data are compared with crime rates among male youth and adults to illustrate differences in levels and patterns of offending. The report also examines the processing of female youth and adults through the courts and provides characteristics of adult females under federal and provincial/territorial corrections. Again, comparisons are drawn with court activity involving males and with adults males under correctional services.

    Release date: 2008-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070029646
    Description:

    Researchers believe that the factors which influence whether or not a person will participate in the political arena can be classified into four main categories: socio-demographic characteristics, sense of mastery, political socialization, and news consumption. This article uses the 2003 General Social Survey to identify the relative importance of these different factors on the probability of engaging in non-voting political activity.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070019629
    Description:

    Using data from 2005 General Social Survey on time use, this article looks at people who describe themselves as workaholics and asks if this self-identification affects their quality of life as measured by the balance between work and family time, time pressure and general life satisfaction.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015088
    Description:

    This article asks whether we talk to our neighbours and how often we do so. It focuses on the role that housing type, family life cycle and place of residence may play in neighbourhood interaction.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013570
    Description:

    In the following remarks I argue that Generational Accounting is a central tool for conducting fiscal policy in the long-term, and that in order to break the fixation of politicians with annual budgetary measures independent government agencies should be directly responsible for calculating the Generational Accounts.

    Release date: 1998-02-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19960128165
    Description:

    The intent of this Juristat is to present police and court data on criminal harassment that are currently available from Statistics Canada's Revised Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey and Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS). As the legislation is relatively new, this report is a first attempt at producing a detailed analysis of criminal harassment data. The statistics in this report provide only a partial picture of criminal harassment in Canada and are not nationally representative. As such, the analysis will focus on the nature of incidents rather than the extent. Please refer to the Methodology section for more details on the data sources.

    Release date: 1996-12-17

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111546
    Description:

    This chapter on families, living arrangements and unpaid work examines the family context and living arrangements of women, including their conjugal lives, and for those in couples, whether they are legal marriages or common-law unions, opposite-sex or same-sex couples, and whether or not there are children present. In addition, female lone-parent families are also analysed, as well as women who live in other arrangements, such as alone or with non-relatives. Other patterns related to births, marriages and divorces are explored, as are family characteristics and living arrangements of immigrant women and visible minority women. Finally, the area of unpaid work is examined, specifically, care of household children, domestic work (including housework and household maintenance) and volunteering.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111413
    Description:

    Many things influence how Canadians navigate their way through the many financial options and services available. One of the factors affecting the finances of individuals is their level of financial knowledge. This article uses the objective assessment (quiz) of financial knowledge that was asked as part of the Canadian Financial Capability Survey (CFCS) in 2009. It explores, for the first time in a national Canadian context, how personal financial knowledge is related to someone's socio-demographic characteristics and other financial behaviours such as having a budget or having investments.

    Release date: 2011-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111123
    Description:

    This article uses the 2004 General Social Survey on criminal victimization to explore how men and women of the core working age population (25 to 54 years) living in Census Metropolitan Areas differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. The results indicate that though men and women do not differ substantially in the amount of crime they perceive around them - they do differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. This difference remains unchanged even when other factors like fear of crime, income, age, and victimization experiences are taken into account.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211021
    Description:

    This article identifies factors that influence the social engagement of children with disabilities aged 5 to 14. The emphasis is put on participation in social activities outside the family home and normal school hours.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210891
    Description:

    More than four in ten Canadians reported a major change in their lives in the last twelve months. Using the 2008 General Social Survey on social networks, this article examines the types of change, their impact and how they are handled at various life stages. Results show that social networks, especially family, played an important role in dealing with change.

    Release date: 2009-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800110509
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this Juristat is intended to provide a profile of female offenders in Canada. Police-reported data are used to present information on the nature and extent of crime among female youth and adults in 2005 and then examine trends in the rate of female youth and adults charged by police with violent and property offences from 1986 to 2005. Data are compared with crime rates among male youth and adults to illustrate differences in levels and patterns of offending. The report also examines the processing of female youth and adults through the courts and provides characteristics of adult females under federal and provincial/territorial corrections. Again, comparisons are drawn with court activity involving males and with adults males under correctional services.

    Release date: 2008-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070029646
    Description:

    Researchers believe that the factors which influence whether or not a person will participate in the political arena can be classified into four main categories: socio-demographic characteristics, sense of mastery, political socialization, and news consumption. This article uses the 2003 General Social Survey to identify the relative importance of these different factors on the probability of engaging in non-voting political activity.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070019629
    Description:

    Using data from 2005 General Social Survey on time use, this article looks at people who describe themselves as workaholics and asks if this self-identification affects their quality of life as measured by the balance between work and family time, time pressure and general life satisfaction.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028455
    Description:

    Numbering 917,000 in 2001, South Asians were the second largest visible minority group in Canada, just behind the Chinese at slightly over one million people. The South Asian community is one of the most diverse visible minority groups, consisting of a range of ethnic, religious and linguistic groups whose ancestries, immigration histories and personal experiences are quite varied. Using data from the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey (EDS) and the 2001 Census of Population, this article examines the diversity of the South Asian population in Canada, traces their history in this country and looks at how their ethnic and cultural backgrounds are reflected in their everyday lives.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015088
    Description:

    This article asks whether we talk to our neighbours and how often we do so. It focuses on the role that housing type, family life cycle and place of residence may play in neighbourhood interaction.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19960128165
    Description:

    The intent of this Juristat is to present police and court data on criminal harassment that are currently available from Statistics Canada's Revised Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey and Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS). As the legislation is relatively new, this report is a first attempt at producing a detailed analysis of criminal harassment data. The statistics in this report provide only a partial picture of criminal harassment in Canada and are not nationally representative. As such, the analysis will focus on the nature of incidents rather than the extent. Please refer to the Methodology section for more details on the data sources.

    Release date: 1996-12-17

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201500114147
    Description:

    Influential observations in logistic regression are those that have a notable effect on certain aspects of the model fit. Large sample size alone does not eliminate this concern; it is still important to examine potentially influential observations, especially in complex survey data. This paper describes a straightforward algorithm for examining potentially influential observations in complex survey data using SAS software. This algorithm was applied in a study using the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey that examined factors associated with family physician utilization for adolescents.

    Release date: 2015-03-25

  • Technical products: 12-002-X201400111901
    Description:

    This document is for analysts/researchers who are considering doing research with data from a survey where both survey weights and bootstrap weights are provided in the data files. This document gives directions, for some selected software packages, about how to get started in using survey weights and bootstrap weights for an analysis of survey data. We give brief directions for obtaining survey-weighted estimates, bootstrap variance estimates (and other desired error quantities) and some typical test statistics for each software package in turn. While these directions are provided just for the chosen examples, there will be information about the range of weighted and bootstrapped analyses that can be carried out by each software package.

    Release date: 2014-08-07

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